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The Elk Mountain pilot. [volume] (Irwin, (Ruby Camp), Gunnison County, Colo.) 1880-19??, September 16, 1880, Image 1

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The Elk Mountain Pilot.
VOL. i .
L. R. THOMPSON. F. W. FULLER.
THOMPSON & FULLER,
Red Estate Ag'tsti Mine Brokers
v HAVE FOR SALE SOME OF THB
BEST BTJSHsTESS lots
—iisr Towisr——
JOOD MINES NEGOTIATED. CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED*
F. W. FULLER, NOTARY PUBLIC.
CORNWALL,
CRA VEN <J
CORNWALL.
9. DEPUTY MINERAL
Surveyors ,
Akl&tX* ASSAYERS
RMITKTOIU TOR THE TOWN OF IRWIN.
Irwin, Gunnison Co., - Colo.
FRANKEBERGER & EATON,
Civil im*l Mining
ENGINEERS
AND U. 3. DEPUTY
Miner a l Surveyors .
■BBT AVE-.'RVBT. NINTH ST., IBWI>*
0
Hsvinc Jii*4 long Mpori»i|<?« in surveying for patents
tbU Ticiuity. All work mmrauterd. tiif
WALTER hTgSaVEsT
OJVIL
I
And V. 8. Deputy
]
MINERAL SURVEYOR, |
1
(Lttt oj the IT.l T . 8. Territorial Survey.)
Cor. Ave. D. and .Ninth St., Irwin.
Janclllm'
JOHN M'CORMICK,
GUILDER
AND CONTRACTOR.
I
•MfirsWr m»i* »Vd plans cliavvu for all Minis of
knildluga. juue24
JOB PRINTING!
PLAIN AND ORNAMENTAL
Don# on Short Notice at Pilot Office.
TjirioinF
BAKERY KESTAURANT
by loits mmm
Ninth St, Below the Postoffice, Irwin
¥LiiiEii;
IRWIN, cOIiO.
DEALERS IN' ALL THE
Daily and Weekly Newspapers, Blank
Books, Stationery, Wall Paper j
And Cigars and Tobacco
Pipes and Smokers’ Sundries in
every variety. We have
THE BEST a f ENT CIGAR
IN THE STATE.
Ninth St.,
J J
Above the Bank .
‘ BANK OF GUNNISOf - 1
|
Sam. A. Gill, E. P. Jacobson.
Cashier. Vice-President j
H. A. W. Tabor, President.
* |
HOURS: 0 A. M. TO -I 3>. M. ■
' i
Da • Qmmwl Banking and Collection Buaiiww. But j
aad M Wrta|» on all fa.maftfca Taßad Stain uni
Eaiataf.
F. H KELLOGG,
j Attorney anti Counsellor at Law,
SOR. NINTH ST. AND AVENEE F, RUBY CAMP
IRWIN P, 0., COLO.
; DUNN & MALONEY,
Attorneys and Counsellors at Law.
ai»d Real Estate a Specialty
Ninth. St., - - Irwin, Co;.o. |
O. P. ABERCROHBIE. G. A. HAWLEY.
' ABERCOMBIE& HAWLEY,
Attorneys cy Counsellors
1 OVER THE PO.VTOFITCK,
; Giiyrisrisoyr, - colo.
S. H. BAKER. GEO. SIMIIONDS.
BAKER & SIMMONDS,
LAWYERS,
-6**Miki.nu Law a Sr£mi.TV."ffi(l
Gr TJlSrilsriSOaSJ", - COLO.
Hakkt L. K.u:it, * Chau. Shack iiMronu,
L A. WYE It S,
Gunnison, Colorado.
j
! Will practice in the wjToral State and Fcdcrol Ceurta.
j AARON HEIMS,
A TTAIO at pa T i
AllQßpihi !i
AND NOTARY PUBLIC.
Gunnison and Ruby, - Colo.!
□Ox*. 33. O. 33L.c-i.ci,
PH YS 1 C IA N and SURGED N.!
i
Irwin, Colo.
Real Estate ancl
MINING AGENCY.
ItST Choice Properties for Sate in Ruby
Mining District, and direct
from first hands.
REFERS TO BANK OF GUNNISON, GUNNISON, I
COLO. CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED.
RICHARD IR WIN\
Cor. Ninth Street and Avenue D,
Irwin, Gunnison Co., Colo. '
P. 0. tox 39.
GEO. IV PETTIT,
Real Estate, Insurance,
.. Property Bought, Sold and Managed.
TCotar-y Public. j
i
Insurance wriicn at fair rates.
Opposite Bank, - Gunnison City, j
| Renshaiv § Smith,
1 Contractors
j
and Builders.
I j
ESTIMATES FURNISHED.
COKRSSIVXDEECE SOLICITED;
Sliop Ivlvrrcu Ligiuh mud Ninth Simet, ra-ai Saw Mill.
ll*lm
i -1
i JAS. A. PRESTON. \..0. YERRY
' PRESTON & VEkRY, !
J 1
News Depot
muu is
' MILLINE RY
A.XD
‘ Fancy Dry Goods.
j STATIONERY. CONFECtIONEIIY, TOBACCO. JT
GABS ASP NOTIONS OF ALL KINDS.
Main St., Ofp. Bank. i
‘ QTJ2ST3S-TSO2S-, - COLO
IRWIN, (RUBY CAMP,) GUNNISON COUNT*.COLORADO, THURSDAY. SEPT. i 6. i«Bc,
THE DEEPEST GORGE
Looking Down Two Miles Upon a Daihing
Strum of Water.
In March last a party of prospectors
thirteen in number, procured the nee- j
essary papers from Gen. Wilcox al- J
lowing them to visit the Indian vil
lage on Cataract cfeek, inhabited by
the Ava Supais, a tribe of Indians
numbering, all told, 200 souls. The
party went from Williamson Valley to
the Big Williams range, and thence to
Pine spring. Here they found every
indication o£ an old sea bed, the
gravel and rocks being round and
smooth,, similar to those in the ocean
bed. ’From Pine spring the party di-.
rented their course for the Ava Supai
village, which is reached by descend
ing from tire table land down one of
the roughest trails ever traveled by
man, for a distance of fourteen miles,
dropping 3000 feet. At places along
the trail we were told that it is not
over twenty inches wide, and winds!
around the perpendicular walls off
sandstone that loom above for hnn- ■
I . j
jdreds of feet, while on the other side, :
j deep, dark canons exist, hundreds!
upon hundreds of feet deep, where,
by one false step or move, man or
beast would be sent to eternity, With
great care and good luck ten of the
party succeeded in reaching the vil
lage, three of the number returning
rather than run the gauntlet in pass-1
ing down this awful, yet marvelous, I
crevice in the earth.
The Ava Supais practice polygamy,
each male having about three wives.
They have about i,ooo acres of ferm
-i.-li.-H-G:
cf a yellowish color and mostly com
, posed of sand. However, it is said to
pumpkins, mel
lons with the aid of irri
gating water, of which they have an
abundance. They have a peach or-j
chard of 250 trees, which were on the ‘
■first of April loaded with small
j peaches about the size of acorns.
Tic party were well received by j
these red people, who stated that their j
j greatest desire was to be left alone in j
j tiie enjoyment of their land and other
! property. Their houses are built with
j poles in a rude manner, thatched over j
with bear grass and fule. A few j
ponies are all the stock they have.
Cataract creek heads in the Big!
Williams and San Francisco moun- i
tains, the streams connecting some j
distance above the Indian vi'Ug .j
The stream empties into the Big Colo- 1
rado, fifteen miles below the Ava ■
Supai town, and a short distance south
of the junction of the Little and Big
Colorado.
The party attempted to explore
Cataract creek to its confluence wi'd
! the Colorado, but were unable to do !
j s'' from the fact that they encountered
j precipice after precipice from 100 to.
200 feet perpendicular, and it was in [
the fool-hardy attempt of D. V*’.
Mooney, of Williams valley, to de-;
scend one of these perpendicular preci- j
pices, 100 feet down, that he was
! dashed to a sudden and rocky tomb, i
| where he now rests as he fell, his corn
: companions being unable to rescue the
| body. Mr. Mooney took a small j
i rope, hardly half an inch in diameter, j
tied the end to a bank, suspended it j
over the brink ; then, taking hold of {
the rope, was soon dangling- between,
tlve bright heavens and the dark gorge
below. Evidently cramp came in his
. arms, or his mind gave way, and he
fell from almost the top to his rocky
and lonely grave below. The party 1
1 remained nearly two days, devising
means and plans to rescue the corpse, j
' but with failure, as no one cared to 1
; risk a descent upon a weak rope. The
; Indians informed the party that no
; man had ever passed through the
i canon; that, in fact, the pass was only
| possible for the birds of the air or to j
spirits of the dead. j
Idaho has a mine named the Eben- j
ezer. It must be pleasant to hear the
crank artisteaithe windlass singing :)
"Here I’ll raise my Ebeneter.” i
A WOMAN'S REWARD.
This seems to be the land of strange 1
and ’stubborn facts, which are sur
rounded by a halo of fancies that
Doing round about, like the nearly
e bused sun’.; corona, shoots out scin
tilU.ums of bright and glorious truth.
Not long since we narrated the exist
j ebee in cur camp of a couple of lady
i were located in Ciin
ton gul f*'ow we are called upon
to'bring to the notice of our readers
a person fully as interesting. About
the first of July a young and aspiring
lady came to this camp. Having been
denied the small boon in her own
state of an opportunity to earn an
honest and virtuous living, she sought
the grand state of Colorado. Having
arrived in Denver some two years ago,!
' she secured employment, and for a i
time everything seemed to favor her; ■
but an evil time came, and she, unable j
longer to obtain means of sustenance ■
in that city, went to Golden, where \
she procured employment in the family !
of Mr. Kimball, was again happy, and
;in a short time accumulated some j
i money, but owing to certain nnforseen !
j causes she was again thrown on the ;
: mercies of the cold world. As the i
| door of her late home closed behind '
I her, she paused a moment, and then :
in her imagination saw her guiding'
angel pointing the'way up the mourn
tain, and to her it was forbidden to!
lookback. In the life of every one |
there are sudden transitions of thought ;
and object which appear almost in
spired. At once she resolved to come
to the mountains, and then the dark
clouds of trouble melted, the 'wind of I
adversity fell, and security succeeded :
tne storm of despair. Her resolve I
•as to no.longer vffer hiit-
lean on others, but walk self
(jonfident and self reliant, and not
waste her time in vain regrets, but
await the fulfillment of boundless hope
and discreet desires —to live wisely in
| t he-present, and make the mysterious
future bring a reward which would be
wealth and happiness. So to Kokomo
she came, and put up at Mr. Bergen’s
j house, procured a pick and shovel, dis-1
jguised herself, and proceeded to scale j
! the mountains and descend into the j
gulches. One bright morning fortune |
favored her. Striking her pick into I
; the side of Jack mountain, her pros- j
I peet of a fortune was reached. She j
| immediately went to work and sunk a ;
| shaft some sixteen feet, which gave ;
! daily and hourely encouragement. So j
1 the time came when siie disposed of a I
I certain interest, realizing a good con-!
-.1'... •• .a rhereirorn, and her wotk is j
|bcl.-g ;■■; ■ ■ pushed, while the re- 1
I mailing i: crest is growing more val- j
nab!e. is buihlinga fine mansion 1
in her rm.Av town 111 Sweden, and!
A . . re which in rents is re
turi g tier ■ competence. She has
i named the property the Hired Girl j
■ lode. It has now a crevice of seven ;
1 feet of mineral, which is a sand car
[.bonate and some galena. The lady ;
is in the neighborhood of twenty years
jof age, and is a native of Sweden, j
| Miss Mary Arvidson, for that is her 1
name, will never forget the 12th of
August, 188°, the day upon which,
her leisure was discovered, or the
moment the angel's finger pointed
Kokornoward.
A CURIOUS SPRING.
j .There is an immense spring over on
the West Dolores, about six miles
from Riio, just . across the head of
Horse gulch and near the base ui Cal
ico peak, that has an ebb and flow that
is quite singular. The basin is about
! twenty-five feet in diameter, and in
the morning is always full of water,
but in the evening is perfectly dry and
i empty. The water is cold and ap
parently of good quality, and the.
basin gradually fills to overflowing,
when it as slowly recedes, effervescing
violently all the time. 1 discovery
| was made by a prospector, who passed
:it in the morning when full ( the basin
; was full, we mean), ar.d on returning
iat night it was empty. He watched
it,with the result mentioned. It is
| exciting considerable curiosity in that
i region. — Rico lYrzt's. ,
THE REASON WHY.
1 “If your mine is as valuable as you
represent it to be why do you wish to
sell it for a mere nominal sum ?” Thi
inquir.y is perhaps more frequent thar
any other among those to whom
mining properties are’offered. It 1-
easily answered from a chapter of our
own personal experience, which is
that of ad the guild ol prospectors.
The prospector is always a poor man.
Men of wealth never personally en
gage in that kind of business, When
a lode or deposit is uncovered — and
they are for the most part found near
the surface, —the expensive work be- j
gins. The law requires that before a !
valid title can be obtained, mineral in j
j place must be defined, terms of law ';
: which every prospector understands, j
j Few shafts pay the expense of sinking
: and timbering from the proceeds of
I the ore taken out, and very tew min
| ers who understand the business will
i drift or slope at a less depth than '
i from fifty to one hundred feet. Hav- j
fng no money and only a grub stake ;
jto begin with, and tfie discoverer
! knowing that unless the ore is of ex- j
I traordinary richness, and the Vein!
• very large, he cannot do the sinking
' without assistance, lie offers his pros- •
: pect ora in:ge ♦uterust in it for sale to !
: the first man who may be willing to '
pay his price. The buver, if unfamiliar 1
. '
with mining, never thinks >? !h'at the '
! shaft must be timbered from top to
bottom as the sinking proceeds, and
that both sinking and timbering are
; expensive. At the depth of seventy
- five to one hundred feet, horse cr
steam power must be used for hoist- 1
ing. All these improvements are
! costly, anti until the. mine is well
! opened, which cannot be aecqmpluffiv
huudreu oci2aig*t
1 profits need be looked for. This
! every miner knows, and proceeds to
sell if he can unon this understanding.
' . * °
iln this manner capital comes into
I possession of all the best mines in the
, country, because it has the very force
| which the prospector has not, and
: without which few mines can be put
upon a paying basis.— lnter-Ocean.
*- -u- -e
HOW TO MAKE A LIVE TOWN
1. Sell your building lots at reason-:
• able prices.
1 2. Induce business men to locate iii l
j your town.
! J . . !
1 3. Patronize the business men cf
i your own town.
4. Speak V. ell of worthy public en
! terprises.
| 6. Ineourage your local newspaper
jby subscribing for, advertising in,
j and paying for it. .
7. If you can afford to do so, do
nate a building lot for some large
business enterprise, and thereby en-,
1 ’nance the. value of your town.
3 1
8. If anything should be under-;
taken tHat may be of benefit to the
[.town, do not speak ill of it to others j
because you happen to be prejudiced
against it.
9. Always sum up your expenses
when you visit places outside your
. own town to buy goods.
1 10. If you have any surplus money
do not spend it in far off speculations,
but give yourself and your own town
the benefit of it by establishing some
profitable factory.
TRUCKEE.
j
i In 1544 a party of men left Council
Bluffs, lowa, to go to Oregon. They
came across the plains, to go to Ore
gon. They came across the plains,
i and when they reached the hunting
grounds of the Shoshones they pro
cured an Indian guide named 1
This Indian accompanied ih • t.i*
Setter's Fort. In traversing this
•region, the Indian told them of a
rapid river that flowed from one great
, river to another. The party did not
reach thF river as soon as they ex
pected) and they began to look upon
“ Truckee’s river” as a river of ,the.
mind, a flowing fiction. “ Truckee’s j
river ” was for a time a frequent jest j
upon their lips, and when at last they
reached the stream he described, they (
had already named it. From ‘-Truc
kee’s river ” to “the Truckee,” Kas
jg j
a transition easv and natural.
1 9 i
IRWIN'S NEW MILL.
Mr. Wiiiitt Rose has formed a part
nership with ‘Messrs. S. A. Reed and
G. N. Wiliiamsori) of New York, the
firm name being Rose, Reed & Co.*
for the purpose of conducting a samp
ling mill at Irwin, in Ruby district;
Gunnison county-, and is now taking
out the sampling machinery from the
Silver Queen mill and forwarding it
there. The mill building is ftoW un
der way at Irwin, and the firm expect
to have the works under full headway
within six weeks. Mr. Rose has made
a careful examination of Ruby dis*
j trict, and considers it one of the best
| for its age in the state* the most so of 1
! any of the new districts, most all of
; which he has visited and examined
| during the past few months. — Gcorgc
i town Miner.
\
1 .... ♦. -»
j Some of the mining camps of Colo*
j rado do not seem to understand the
I importance of supporting their local
j papers. Ihe influence of such a pa
! per is not to be measured by the num
; ber of subscribers i; has ip. the camp,
■ or outside of the camp either for that
matter. Ihe good that a prosp nm,
: paper of that kind ran dr-, a: - r
where the miners and adverti era .
t;iliute liberally to its support, H ar
, • map !sl:(.! kugely thrtiu.h j
I with the press at'iar.-- . ‘
j ten article about a valuab; . a
I seized on with avidity by ait rhe
journals throughout the country who
devote attention to mining matte
: and ip this way, a local • i
i perhaps not succeeding i'v : i
; subsetißers r< at hes ft.c or six mil ns
.of readers. To - tammy «.rr . of
! Colorado owe much o: that prosperi
;ty to their camp papers, and they
1 sho\iid.sr ) ( to it that they are kept up
'.hi♦r'lfcv
jprictofs'to furnish first-class newspa
pers. — lnter- Ocean .'
He opened the door cautiously, and,
poking liis head in, in a suggestive
sort of wiy. as if there was more to
follow, inquired :
“Is tins tiieeditorial rinktum?
“ The what, my fiiend?"
“ Is this tiie rinirtum- fanktuHi—
| sinktum—sanctum, orsohi? such place
| where the editors live ?”
1 “ This is the editorial room, yesj
i sir : come in I ”
.1 “No, I guess I won’t come in ; I
wanted to sec what a rinktum was
like, that’s all. Looks like our gar*
ret, but only wus; good-day.”
Quite a novelty in metallurgy is re
ported to be one of the features of a
hew chlorination process, ami cot j
j sists in the separation of the gold by
Alteration through or agitation with
, charcoal (or bone black). The gold
:is thereby reduced from its solution
and precipitated in the metalic state
■on the surface of the charcoal, coat*
ing the fragments with a brilliant film
of gold. This singular phenomenon
seems to be a physical and not a them
ical action. —Scientific Press. .
A Cleave-land paper says: Dan. P.
Kells, while at the mines of the Ohio
■ Central Coal company, discovered a
toad, which, according to statements
■of geologists, must be at least -5,000
years old. He was found alive in June,
i iSß*h in the center of the great coai
i n
; vein, shaft No. 15, sixty feet below
the surface. When discovered it was
| somewhat shriveled looking, being
similar to a good sized hopper.
Mr. Kells has it preserved in alcoiv i
and intends to prt-ser.t it to the his
torical society.
Joseph Nev ins was killl'd at R ..o's
cabin, near Lake City, tiie 6th inst.,
i .;y \- d) McLaughli la £
over ? ...v . •' .j, >*• :
M La ;■ .the :
axe. Tut- latter in d> J
j drew a rexol-,er and shot Nevin.j -u. il
ly. The coroners jury brought in a
verdict justifying tiie homicide.
j . Wm. H. Green wo ri. .-mveral years
chief engineer of tiie D. -e R. G p. y,
but recently engage «i - *. ..
fr.r Palmer & Sullivan, railway to:,
tractors, was murdered near the city
Jof Mexico, the is:h nlti
NO. 14

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