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The prison mirror. [volume] (Stillwater, Minn.) 1887-1894, March 05, 1891, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063465/1891-03-05/ed-1/seq-4/

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CHAUTAUQUA.
THE NAME “AMERICA.”
At the eighth international congress of Amer
icanists, which was held in Paris from October 14,
ito October 20, 1890, only a certain number of the
-questions treated were of interest from a geograph
ical point of view. Among these may be mentioned
the discussion on the origin of the name “Amer
ica,” which was opened by M. Jules Marcou, who
asserted, as we learn from the “Proceedings of the
Royal Geographical Society,” London, tnai the
name “America” was derived from a range of
mountains in Central America, which in the lan
guage of the natives, is called “Amerique;” and
that Vespucci never bore the Christian name of
“Amerigo,” because this latter is not a saint’s
name in the Italian calendar; and, further, that
he changed his name “Alberco” to "Amerigo” for
the first time after the name by which the New
World ie now commonly known, began to be used,
in order to cause it to be believed that the con
tinent was so named in his honor. But M. Govi
proved two years ago that the name “Alberico”
is in tne Florentine language identical with “Amer
igo;” and that Vespucci, before the year 1500,
sometimes subscribed himself “Amerigo” appears
from a letter recently discovered among archives
of the Duke of Gonzaga at Mantua. This point
was corroborated by the Spanish Americanist, De
la Espada, from letters and pamphlets preserved
iu the Archiv de las Indias, at Seville, in which
Vespucci sometimes calls himself “Alberico,” and
sometimes “Amerigo.” En passant, the Spanish
savant, mentioned the interesting fact that the
first of the so-called “quatour navigations” was
not made by Vespucci at all. M. Hamy adduced
a further interesting proof of the incorrectness of
M. Marcou's contention, in the shape of a map of
the world prepared in the year 1490 by the car
tographer Valiescu, of Mallorca, on the base of
which is a note to the effect that the map was
bought in at an auction by the merchant Amerigo
Vespucci for 120 gold ducats. Further, the gen
eral secretary of congress, M. Pector, pointed out
that, according to a communication received from
President of Nicarauga. the range of mountains
in question is not called”Amerique” at all, but
“Amerisque.” After this very thorough discus
sion of the question, it is hoped that the accusa
tion against Vespucci and Hylacomylus may not
be heard of again. An important contribution to
the cartography of America was furnished by the
paper read by M. Marcel upon two globes discov
ered by him, which dates back probably from the
year 1513. America is a very good, and it might
be said that it is a very appropriate name for
this conntry. No doubt it would have been more
honoring to Christopher Columbus should this
-country have been named after him.—Science.
HOW THE WORLD APPEARS TO THE LOWER
ANIMALS.
In addition to the organs of hearing, touch, and
smell Sir John Lubbock has found upon the an-
tennae of insects certain organs that seem to be
connected with senses that we know nothing
about.
Experiments made upon certain fresh water
crustaoeans show thst they are sensible to sounds
corresponding to more than 40.0C0 vibrations per
sec md (sounds that we cannot hear), and to
ultra-violet rays that we cannot perceive. Now
all the rays that we can perceive appear to us
with definite colors, and it should be the same
with these animals; so that it is probable that
they see colors that are unknown to us and that
are as different from those that we "are familiar
with as red is different from yellow or green from
-violet. It w >uld result from this that natural
light, which seems white to us, would appear
colored to them, and that the aspect of nature
would be entirely different to them from what it
is to us. It is possible, therefore, that to certain
ammals nature is full of sounds, colors, and sen
sations that we have no idea of.—Scientific Amer
ican. v
ST. PETERSBURG’S DIRECTORY,
There is no directory in the city of St. Peters
burg. The Government, for obvious reasons,
CHnnot allowed such a work to be published.
In the first place, the publisher, a private busi
neiH man. w..uld have to put himself in communi
cation with the entire population of the city
gathering their names and addresses. If he or
his agents should have any “noncomforming”
(ra-kolim) views they might have a chance to
ad vucate them. The Government cannot allow
that. Besides, it is a matter of concern to the
police to know who calls on whom. Suspicious
»,or« ••• are mt cert bv and known to the nolie.e,
wh" also desire to know the persons who have any
dealings with them. Instead of a city directory,
which m glit be kept open at every drug store or
cffic- of any importance, there is in St. Petersburg
one central address bureau. The clerks of that
establishment are Tchinovniks, city officials.
bound to work hand in hand with the polioe. If
you desire to find out the address of any inhabit
ant you must go to the bureau for it, hand the
name of the man yon inquire for in your own
handwriting to any of the clerks, and you will get
his address on a slip of paper. If the person you
seek is an object of suspicion to the police you may
depend on it that your business with him will be
diligently inquired into. Since January women
clerks have been placed in the address bureau,
and the men whose places they take are trans
ferred to other city offices.—N. Y. Bun.
WON B¥ AMERICANS.
Tlie Leading Prizes Come to the United.
States.
In The Queen's last word contest. Dr. Edmund
T. Stevens, of Buffalo, N. Y., won the first prize of
a free trip to Europe and S2OO in cash, and Annie
B. Turner, of Deposit, N. Y., secured the special
prize of a handsome, Shetland pony.
The publishers of this well-known Magazine
have decided to offer one more Competition, and
to the persons sending them the largest list of En
glish words (of not less than four letters) con
structed from letters contained in the three words,
“Dominion of Canada” they offer many useful
prizes, including $750 in cash, Shetland ponies
China Dinner Sets, Gold Watches, French Music
Boxes, Portiere Curtains, Silk Dresses, Mantle
Clocks, etc., all to be awarded strictly in order of
merit. An elegant Silver Tea Service (valued
S3O) will be given each day to the persons from
whom the largest list is received that day from
the State in whioh they reside. The object of
this Special Daily Prize for each State is to in
crease the interest in The Queen's Competitions
in every locality in the United States. Those de
siring to contest for one of these valuable prizes
may start on their list at once, but send six U. S.
2c. stamps, and receive last number of The Queen
with full particulars before forwarding your list.
Address The Canadian Queen, Toronto, Canada.
Silence Am de Goldenesit.
“It doan’ pay to do much talkin’ w’en you’ mad
enuff to choke,
’Kase de word dat stings de deepes’ am de'one
dat’s neber spoke;
Let the other feller wrangle till de storm am
blowed away.
Den he ’ll do a pile ob thinkin’ ’bout de things
you did n’t say.” —Puck.
Too Much for Ned.
Gov. Nicholls, of Louisiana, as most people
know, has lost an arm and a leg, but so deftly
have the artificial members been fitted to the
stumps that but few people are in the secret of
his loss. His colored body servant was left be
hind on the occasion of his last visit in Vicksburg,
and they put at his disposal during his stay there
a likely young lad, who was told to try and take
the old body servant’s place. That night, when
Gov. Nicholls was ready to retire, he stretched
out one of his legs to Ned, the servant, and said:
“Ned, unscrew that leg.” Ned’s eyes began to
open with horror, but he obeyed, and took the leg
off. Gov. Nicholls then said, calmly stretching
out an arm. “Ned, unscrew that arm.” The boy
rolled up his eyes until nothing but the whites
could be seen, but he obeyed and unscrewed the
arm. The Governor, who now realized his con
dition of mind, determined to have a little fun
with him, so, reaching out his neck, he said:
“Ned, unscrew that head.” But the boy never
waited to see whether his head would come off or
not, and no one ever succeeded in getting him to
go near Gov. Nicholls again. He said he was the
worst “hoodoo” that he ever saw.—Cincinnati En
quirer.
A Twirling Stone.
There has been discovered about half a mile
west of the Bargytown ledges, a twirling stone of
about five tons weight. It has always been re
garded as a bowlder, and from the way it is poised
on the rock beneath it, no one could see why it
should not rock. Hundreds have tried to rock it
in vain, and the surprise of the man who first
felt it move under pressure may better be imag
ined than described. It moves hard, of course,
but it moves, the fiDder informs us, round as if it
was placed upon a pivot. It has been carefully
examined, and while it looks like a bowlder, sev.
eral allege that it must be a ceremonial stone set
there by some prehistoric race. This rock is cre
ating great interest among the bowlder hunters of
eastern Connect icut. —Norwich Bulletin.
It requires years to make one saint, but
sinners can be turned out at the rate of a
dozen a minute.—Texas Siftings.
Good will, like a good name, is got by
many actions, and lost by one.—Jeffrey.
Whatever kind of persons you seem to
cherish and support, these you will be
thought to resemble.—Demosthenes.
The death of a bookkeeper should occa
sion no surprise, as it is natural for him to
go to his accounts.—Texas Siftings.
We are to keep ourselves from opportu
to sis. ar.d. Gad will keep ns-fram
sinning.
“Only the brave eits the fare.” remarked
the tramp as he tackled a large piece of
mince pie which the farmer’s wife brought
to him. —Texas Siftings.
J. G. IENING,
(Successor to Hening & Millard)
DEALER IN
PM MGS & MEDICINE!!
Perfumery, Toilet and. Fancy
Articles, Brushes, Etc.
FINE CIGARS.
Physicians’ Prescriptions Carefully Componnded
208 Chestnut St. Stillwater, Minn.
FRED SCOTT,
223 South Main St., Stillwater, Minn.,
—DEALER IN—
Drugs,Medicines & Chemicals
ELLIOTT HOUSE,
Cor. Third A Chestnut Sts.,
STILLWATER, .... MINN
Remodeled and First-class in Every
Respect.
J. E. ELLIOTT, Manager.
City Book Store.
Blank
Books
—AND—
OFFICE SUPPLIES
Of All Kinds.
Fine Cerrespendence
STATIONERY
A SPECIALTY.
The Largest and Best Stock of WALL
PAPER in the City. All Goods at the
Very Lowest Prices.
R. A. PHINNRY,
Stillwater, Minn.
MINNESOTA
MERCANTILE CO.,
Corner Chestnut & Water Sts.,
STILLWATER, - - - - MIM.
The Only Exclusive
Wholesale & Mil House
In the City.
LUMBERMEN’S
SUPPLIES A SPECIALTY.
WE are in a condition to com
pete successfully with any
house in the NORTHWEST. Our
shipping facilities being equal if not
superior to those of any other house
in the country, onr customers can
depend on having all orders en
trusted to as filled with
PROMPTNESS & DISPATCH.
THE BEST PUCE FOR
FINE CAKES
—AND—
CANDIES.
THE CHICAGO
Bakery and Restaurant
MEALS AT ALL HOURS.
241 8. Main St., Stillwater, Minn., next to Open
House.
CHAS. HEITMAN, Prop.
NEW YORK
Dry Goods Emporium,
309 & 311 main St.
(GRAND OPERA HOUSE BLOCK)
STILLWATER, MINK.
The Leading Store In The City.
DRY GOODS & MILLINERY
Carpets and Wall Paner,
In Endless Variety, And At
Lowest Prices,
Our Stock of Ladies’ and Children’s Gar
ments for the Winter Season
of 1891 will be the largest
ever shown in this
City.
We Solicit A Call of Inspec
tion.
RESPECTFULLY,
Louis Albcnberg & CO.
Stillwater. Minn.
NEW YORK
CLOTHING EMPORIUM,
310 Main Street.
(OPPOSITE GRAND OPERA HOUSE,)
Stillwater, Minn.
Largest Stock of
MEN’S, BOYS’
AND
CHILDREN’S CLOTHING
In the City.
HATS, CAPS
AND
Furnishing Goods
OF ALL DESCRIPTION,
AND
IN ENDLESS VARIETY
Our Prices are the Lowest in the City
. All Goods Warranted as repre
sented.
Give us a call, and examine our Immense
Stock.
Respectfully,
Louis Albenbcrg Sc Co.
*
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