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The prison mirror. [volume] (Stillwater, Minn.) 1887-1894, May 19, 1892, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063465/1892-05-19/ed-1/seq-4/

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G HAUTAUQUA.
LAST SUNDAY'S MEETING
The usual fortnightly meeting of the Pierian
Circle was held in the chapel of the institution
last Sunday afternoon, and the program sub
mitted was well sustained throughout. The lead
ing features of the day were the beautiful recita
tion, entitled, "The Wooden Bowl,” by Class A,
which brought down the house, and the article,
"Woman as a Political Factor,” by Class B.
Class D did excellent. His paper on "The Influ
ence of Religion” drew forth the highest praises.
It was his first attempt, and if the last be as good
as the first, his diploma will be covered all over
with seals. "The Negro Question” was ably pre
sented, while “The Tint of Green in the Star-
Spangled Banner,” though short, did much to re
pair the damage done to the Irish reputation, as
the pillars of America's fame, at the last meeting
when it was driven to a secondary position by the
Rev. Critic.
The following is the
program:
Solo.
Across the Bridge Pierian Choir.
Report.
Schiller ...... Class C.
Report.
The Influence of Religion Class D.
Report.
The Success of the American Constitution. Class A.
Solo.
Down On the Farm Pierian Choir.
Report.
Witchcraft Class F.
Special Paper.
Abraham Lincoln Class B.
Recitation.
The Wooden Bowl Class A.
Report.
Woman as a Political Factor Class B
Special Paper.
The Negro Question Class C.
Special Paper.
The Tint of Green in the Star-Spangled
Banner Class C.
Solo and Chorus.
A Thousand Tears : Pierian Choir.
WOMAN AS A POLITICAL FACTOR.
(Report for Class B by R. M.)
"They talk about a woman’s sphere
As though it had a limit;
There's not a place in earth or heaven,
There's not a task to mankind given,
There’s not a blessing or a woe.
There’s not a whisper, yes or no, .
There’s not a life, or death, or birth,
That has a feather's weight of worth,
Without a woman in it.”
That woman has no voice in our political squab*
bles must not be taken as conclusive evidence
'that she exerts no influence upon the politics of
our country. Hampered as she is. by social and
religious prejudices and by legal discriminations,
she still exerts a healthy, purifying and elevating
influence.
It is a difficult matter to correctly estimate the
force of direct influences; therefore, any estimate
placed upon woman’s indirect influence is more
than liable to be far from correct. Nevertheless,
we may safely say that Harriet Beecher Stowe,
with her "Uncle Tom’s Cabin,” was the indirect
influence which made it possible for Abraham
Lincoln to issue his emancipation proclamation,
and that Jane Grey Swisshelm, with her ever
ready and sarcastically sharpened pen, was the
indirect cause of Minnesota’s high political and
moral standard of to-day. But these two women
aro exceptions, and their work—high above the
average—is no criterion by which to judge of
woman’s influence in general. I have simply men
tioned these two names to illustrate and empha
size the fact that woman, when she girds her
armor on, and goes out to battle for what she con
siders just and right, can achieve fully as much
as her boasted superior—man—and the time is
drawing near when she will demand and receive
the right to cast her ballot and have it counted as
equal to that of her lord and master. I use the
word "master” because as our laws stand to-day
woman is nothing more nor less than man’s legal
slave. He taxes her without representation; he
takes her children from her by force of law; and
yet we boast of a government of the people for the
people. If women are not people, what are they?
They certainly are not cattle, and the politician of
to-day who ignores woman as a factor in his polit
ical problem makes a very grave mistake, for,
already her advance guard is in sight. Those
women who to-day are entering our colleges,
graduating with honors and forcing their way into
professional fields, represent the ability, pluck
and determination of the great army of women
who are to follow. It is but a step from profes
sional to political fields and women meeting with
success in professional fields to-day will not hesi
tate to-morrow to jump the political fence, and
once inside the political field there won't be found
men enough in America to corral her or put her
out. Then will be inaugurated such a house clean
ing in our political mansion as will gladden the
J. C. HENING,
(Successor to Hening & Millard)
DEALER IN
PIE DRUGS & MEDICINES
Perfumery, Toilet and Fancy
Articles, Brushes, Etc.
FINE CIGARS.
Physicians’ Prescriptions Carefully Compounded
208 Chestnut St. Stillwater, Minn.
FRED SCOTT,
223 South Main St., Stillwater, Minn.,
—DEALER IN—
Drugs, Medicines & Chemicals
ELLIOTT HOUSE,
Cor. Third & Chestnut Sts.,
STILLWATER. .... MINN
Remodeled and First-class in Every
Respect.
J. E. ELLIOTT, Manager.
heart of "Josiah Allen’s Wife,” and "Samantha”
(bless her dear old soul) shall "set on the Metho
dist conference,” and as presiding officer have the
pleasure of calling time on some of those long,
winded brethren who think "wimin too weak to
set.” Minnesota won’t disgrace herself by lic
encing saloons in order to raise afree-school fund;
husbands and fathers of families will not be seen
in the wee small hours of the morning staggering
homeward under “heavy loads” of liquid trouble,
or frantically endeavoring to unlock the front
door with the handle of an umbrella, or going to
sleep in the woodshed rather than attend the in
dignation meeting which they know awaits them
in the presence of their outraged wives; the
saloonkeeper will immigrate because to him hell
would be a paradise compared to a country where
woman holds the balance of power and uses it to
protect her home, her happiness and the honor of
her country.
There Was No Tragedy.
In his excitement his voice rose, and the
two men in the next room heard him say,
with startling distinctness:
“You’re a liar—understand? What you
say is a foul, deliberate lie, and 1 tell you
so to your face.”
The man in the next room, with his chair
against the door connecting the two rooms,
got up and hastily moved away, and he and
his companion waited silently for the cli
max.
“You’re a dishonest scoundrel! ” went oh
the voice. “Your enmity is a greater honor
than your friendship. Your associates show
that.”
"There’ll be trouble there in a minute,”
said a listener. "What’s the trouble about?”
"Don’t know,” replied the other. “I
didn’t overhear the first of the conversation.
But I’m glad to get away from that door—
a bullet would come through it mighty
easy.”
“If a man said that to me,” continued
the voice, "I’d shoot him—understand? I’d
kill him, if 1 wasn’t a skulking coward! ”
The two listeners held their breath until
they heard the man in the next room con
tinue in a lower tone:
"That’s what I said to him, and —”
"Ho! ” said one of the listeners. "He’s
just telling what he said to some one else.”
"What he says he said to some one else,”
corrected the other. "I know the class.”—
Chicago Tribune.
A Big Saw for Work on metal Plates.
Carnagie, Phipps & Co., who have the
government contract for a portion of the
armor plates of the new navy, are to add to
the finishing plant of the armor department
at their Homestead mill, near Pittsburg, a
gigantic saw, weighing 110 tons, that will
cut a nickel steel armor plate as an ordinary
saw does a plank. The armor plates range
in weight from 8 to 38 tons, and are some
times 29 feet long and 20 inches thick.
The saw has a blade 7K feet in diameter,
geared from above and revolving horizon
tally. With it an angular slab of cold
nickel steel, weighing perhaps a dozen tons,
is taken off like the slab of a pine log. The
saw is the first of its kind used in this
country and cost 535.000. —Scientific Amer
ican.
One Way of Settling; a Difficulty.
Two prisoners, Francisco Briones Gam
boa and Victor Higuera, were implicated
in a murder at Guara. The Guayaquil
court, being unable to fix the relative guilt
of either? passed the following sentence,
“They shall draw lots, and the one favored
by chance shall not be executed and shall
have his sentence commuted to that of im
prisonment for life, which sentence he shall
serve in the prison of the capital of the re
public, after being present at the execution
of the other murderer.” —Panama Star and
Herald.
City Book Store.
Blank
Books
—AND—
OFFICE SUPPLIES
Of All Kinds.
Fine Correspondence
STATIONERY
A SPECIALTY.
The Largest and Best Stock of WALL
PAPER In the City. All Goods at the
"VEffY Lowest Prices.
EL A. PHINNEY,
Stillwater, Minn.
MINNESOTA
MERCANTILE CO.,
Corner Chestnut & Water Sts.,
STILLWATER, .... RI\X.
The Only Exclusive
Wholesale & Jobbing Hon
In the City.
LUMBERMEN’S
SUPPLIES A SPECIALTY.
WE are in a condition to com
pete successfully with any
bouse in the NORTHWEST. Our
shipping facilities being equal if not
superior to those of any other house
in the country, our customers can
depend on having all orders en
trusted to us filled with
PROMPTNESS & DISPATCH.
••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
• rpHE RIPANS TABULES regulate the stomach, •
• A liver and bowels, purify the blood, are pleas- •
• ant to take, safe and always effectual. A reliable •
• remedy for Biliousness, Blotches on the Face, •
• Bright’s Disease, Catarrh, Colic, Constipation, •
• Chronic Diarrhoea, Chronic Liver Trouble, Dia- •
• betes, Disordered Stomach, Dizziness, Dysentery, 5
• Dyspepsia, Eczema, Flatulence, Female Com- Z
sfaints,5 faints, Foul Breath, Headache, Heartburn, Hives, Z
aundice, Kidney Complaints, Liver Troubles, •
• Loss of Appetite, Mental Depression,- Nausea, •
• Nettle Rash,! Painful Diges- •
• tion, Pimples, Hush of Blood •
• to the Head, Sallow Co- •
• plexion, Salt hbeum, Scald •
f Head, Scrof- ula,Sick Head- 5
2 ache,SkinDis- I eases,Sour Z
Z Stomach. Tired Feeling,Torpid •
• Liver, Ulcers, Water Brash •
• and every other symptom •
• nr disease that! Ir <-g lilts from •
• impure blood or a failure in the proper perform- •
• ance of their functions by the stomach, liver and 7
2 intestines. Persons given to over-eating are ben- 7
2 efited by taking one tabule after each meal. A q
Z continued use of the Ripans Tabules is the surest
Z cure for obstinate constipation. They contain •
• nothing that can be injurious to the most deli- •
• cate. 1 gross $2, 1-2 gross $1.25, 1-4 gross 75c., •
• 1-24 gross 15 cents. Sent by mail postage paid. •
• Address THE RIPANS CHEMICAL COMPANY, •
• P. O. Box 672, New York. •
PENSIONS
THE DISABILITY BILL IS A LAW.
Soldiers Disabled Since the War are Entitled
Dependent widows and parents now dependent
whose sons died from effects of army service are in
cluded. If you wish your claim speedily and suc
* address JAMES TANNER
Late Com. ef Pensions, Washington D.C.
THE BEST PLACE FOR
FINE CAKES
—AND—
CANDIES.
THE CHICAGO
Bakery and Restaurant
MEALS AT ALL HOURS.
241 S. Main Bt., Stillwater, Minn., next to Opera
House.
CHAS. HEITMAN, Prop.
NEW YORK
Dry Goods Emporium,
113 to 121 So. Main St.
114 to 122 So. Water St.
STILLWATER,
The Leading Store'ln The City.
DRY GOODS & MILLINERY
Carpets and Wall Paner,
In Endless Variety, And At
Lowest Prices,
Our Stock of Ladies’ and Children’s Gar-
ments for the Winter Season
of 1891-2 will be the largest
ever shown in this
City.
We Solicit A Call of Inspec-
tion.
RESPECTFULLY,
Louis Albenberg & CO.
Stillwater. Minn
NEW YORK
CLOTHING EMPORIUM,
113 to 121 South Main St.
114 to 122 South Water St.
Stillwater,
Larsest Stock of
MEN’S, BOYS’
AND
CHILDREN’S CLOTHING
In tlie City.
HATS, CAPS
AND
Furnishing Goods
OF ALL DESCRIPTION,
AND
IN ENDLESS VARIETY
Our Prices are the Lowest in the City
All Goods Warranted as repre
sented.
Give us a call, and examine our Immense
Stock.
Respectfully,
Louie Albenberg dc Co.
- - MINN
Minn.

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