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Las Vegas daily optic. [volume] (Las Vegas, N.M.) 1880-1908, January 23, 1900, Image 1

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Printing of all kinds
neatly and quickly turn
ed out at this office.
ii JHi-E
1
v7
0 4
Ls Yejas The City of
Homes. $1,000,000 in new
Buildings in three years.
t!
iLJ
VOL. XXI.
EAST LAS VKGAS. MIW MEXICO, 'lTKSDAY EVENING, JANUARY 2H, 1000.
NO. GO
M P. A 'TT'
vfj'(i 1'
li l i mmmm i tm-mmmm Mi mmmw . . . A. 1 . -J
THE BOERS
IN BATTLE
No Important Advantages to the
British After Two Days of
Fl&htlng.
SOME EXCITING NEWS TODAY
British Attack the Boers' Posl
tlon at Colesberg and Bloody
Work Is Done
BOERS HOLDING THEIR OWN
London, Jan. 232:20 p. m. Ab
sence of news of yesterday's move
ments in ifche north Tugela river re
gion is occasioning some additional
anxiety, but General Duller is engaged
in big operations Which will take con
siderable time to work out. Even
a slight advance in General Warren's
forces, after twodays fighting, does
not appear to have yielded important
advantage to tihe British, as the cap
tured kopjes were evidently only held
as advanced posts in order to delay
the progress of the British troops and
enable the Boers to complete their
entrenchments and mount their guns
in positions on Which they elected to
make a stand. It is remarked that
the Boers thus far have used little
artillery, from which it is judged that
tlheir guns are already mounted on
"tactical positions, from which the Bri
tish will have to dislodge the republi
cans ( -before reaching Ladysmith.
There is no confirmation of the report
that Lord Dundonald had entered
LadysmRh and none is expected. Ex
perts are of opinion that the Boers
would only be too glad to let him in
unopposed. ' Dispatches posted at fhe
war office up to 3 o'clock, this after
noon, though dated Spearman's Camp
today, contain nothing but reports of
casualties. Gen. Buller reports woun
ded, January 20th, included; second
Lancashires: Captains Dod, Whyte,
Ormondand Lieut. Campbell. In the
York and Lancaster regiments:
Lieuts. Smith, Wedd and Staff Cap
tain Dallas. . . .
London, Jan. 23 It was reported on
the stock exchange that two battal
ions of British troops had been cap
tured 'by the Boers.
BeTOnJan. 23 A rumor on
bourse is to the effect that General
Ta. 23 A rumor
Buller had suffered defeat. : '; '
The fact that General Buller this
morning sent lists of casualties of
British troops, seems to disprove these
stories.
Kimberly, Jan. 23 The Boers con
tinue a heavy and active bombard
ment of this place.
New York, Jan. 23 The Bruasel's
correspondent of the "World" obtain
ed the following statement from Dr.
Leyds, of Transvaal, the envoje-ex-traordinary
to Europe, before, he .left
for Paris yesterday on a diplomatic
mission: "In view of the new criti
cal phase into which the war is now
entering, I send the people of America
a few words on the subject of any
eventual proposals in regard to sus
pension of hostilities, the desire for
which appears to be gaining strength
on both sides of the Atlantic. I am.
as confident as ever of the ultimate
triumph of our cause. The temporary
success of the British arms would
merely have the effect of . infusing
fresh vigor into our men and strength
ening their determination to hold out.
at whatever cost. Yet this does not
alter the fact that President Kriiger'S;
attitude is and will remain to be one
of conciliation and that he would be
both ready and desirous of a treaty on
any terms which assured the South
African republic that independ
ence, so much insisted on in the Bri
tish statement, during the earlier
period of the negotiations."
Boer Camp, Upper Tugela River,
Jan. 19 The British now occupy
three positions along the Tugela river.
Their naval guns have been firing
steel-pointed, armor-piercing shells.
Reports are being received that 2,000
British avalry were attempting to
outflank along Drakensberg ridge
and a strong patrol was sent to re-
connoiter.. Mistaking the signals,
scouts ana patrol proceeded to a
kopje, from which a terrific rifle and
Maxim-gun fire suddenly opened. The
Boers lost fourteen killed and twen
ty wounded. The British loss , was
probably insignificant.
The bombardment of the Boer posi
tions from Swartzkopf was resumed
yesterday chiefly from a battery
brought across the river. In the 'af
ternoon, the cannonading became ex
ceedingly brisk and under cover there
of, the infantry advanced in three
lines to a second row of kopjes, which
they occupied at nightfall, but later
retired to their old position. During
, the night, scores were fired by the
British and a balloon was sent lip to
spy out the Boer positions. The naval
guns renewed the bombardmentthis
morning from a new position, but
- without result. '
Head Laager, Ladysmith, Cape Col
ony, Jan. 23 The sixty-ninth birthday
of General Jonbert was celebrated
by General Botha making a recon-noissan-ee
in force towards the Drak
enshurg mountains, turning the. Bri
tish advance, after a short engage
ment. Joubert accompanied Presi-
dent Kteyn to the Free State laagers
south of Ladysmita. The president
was in high spirits. He proposes to
make a tour of all the laagers near
Ladysmith and sent up many colored
rockets last night The Boer move
ment on the British advance, above re
ferred to may have had reference
to General Warren's forward
fighting, in which, according to ad
vices rrom British sources received
yesterday, the Boers were on the de
fensive almost the entire day, save
once, when they attempted to outflank
the British left and were elgnally
checkmated.
Pretoria, Jan. 21 A dispatch from
Colesburg, Oape Colony, says: The
British attacked the Boers' positions
there at 10 o'clock this morning.
There was heavy lighting, but with
what result is not known. According
to he latest accounts, the Boers were
holding their positions.
A dispatch from Colenso, January
18th, says a patrol of 200 men, under
Field Cornet- Oppormann, while scout
ing, were surrounded, but succeeded
in fighting its way back. It is report
ed that four men were killed, thirty
wounded and made prisoners,
Head Boer Laager, Ladysmith, Jan.
22 Quarters of Generals White and
Hunter were smashed this morning by
a shot from "Long Tom." It is not
known whether any occupants of the
building were killed.
London, Jan. 23 Field Marshal
Lord Roberts reports from Cape Town
that the war situation is unchanged.
Officials at the war office say no de
cisive news is expected for two 'or
three days,
OTHER POLYGAMISTS.
Federal Officials in Utah Under Con
gressional Fire.
Washington, Jan. 23 Investigation
directed by the house concerning the
charges that certain federal appoint
ees of Utah, were polygamists at the
time of their appointment, was resum
ed today by the house committee on
postoffices. General Bristow, fourth
assistant postmaster general, Buhmit
ted a petition in the case of Orson
Smith, postmaster at Logan, Utah,
dated December 6th, 1897, and direct
ed to the president. It states that
Smith is not a fit person to hold any
position under the government of the
United States, because he is an ec
clesiastic of the Mormon church,
holding high office In that church.
It was received and briefed in the
usual way, hut no uttntion was di
rected to it until -3e recent agitation
occurred. The petition was not called
to the attention of the posbmastei
general or president
Steamer Sunk.
Vineyard Haven, Mass., Jan. 23
The Glasgow steamer, Ardandhu, from
New London, Conn., for Halifax, N. S.,
sunk in collision .with the Metropoli
tan liner, Herman Winter, from Bos
ton, for New York, off Robinson's
Hole. Vineyard, Sound, this morning.
Two of the Ardandhu's crew of thir
ty-one men were lost. They are:
Chief Engineer ' Jos. Henderson, of
Glasgow; second mate, Fred Dowe, of
Boston. Herman Winter reached this
polit this afternoon with the bow
gone.-' She had on board twenty-nine
men, who escaped from the Ardandhu,
Steamer News.
Port Townsend, Wash., Jan. 23
The steamer, Cottage City, , arrived
today from Alaskan ports and reports
the total loss of the steamer Town-
send, near Hain's Mission, Tuesday
night; also, reports havirg found the
Overdue steamer, City of Seattle,
anchored between Point St. Mary and
Point Bridget with her.propeller miss
ing, Sunday morning, in a dangerous
position. She towed the City of
Seattle to Juneau.
; , Good Representation. ,
Indianapolis; Ind., Jan. 23 The in
terstate conference of United Mine
Workers and coal operators was call
ed this morning With about 175 prom
inent operators trom Illinois, Pennsyl
vania, Iowa, Indiana and Michigan
present. The miners have over BOO
representatives at the conference. It
is prelicted it will last urutdl the mid
die of next week.
Two Banks Close.
. Thompsonville, Con., Jan. 23 The
private banking house of R. D. and
Robert Spencer, of this place, and
Robert E. Spencer, of Hazardvllle.
Conn., closed today. The two banks
w.ere closely connected.
Prohib. Convention.
Chicago, Jan. 23 The call for a na
tional prohibition convention waf is
sued today. The convention is to
meet at the Coliseum in Chicago, on
Wednesday, June 27th.
Don't forget the plane sale. You
can get a piano at your'own price and
terms. Next to Gehring's, Sixth
street. " 65-2t
. TO rRB A UUtD JN OKI DAT.
Take Laxative Bromo Quinine Tab
eta. All druggists refund the money
if it fails to cure, 25c. The genuine has
L. B. Q. on each tablet. 248-6m
Dr. C. H. Bradley, office and resi
dence on Sixth street, lacing Hill
side, park, (the Henriques property.)
39-20-tf
One of the most attractive dining
rooms in the city is the neat, cosy hall
of the El Dorado hotel. Mrs. Ella Mc
Caddon the proprietor, has engaged
the services of a first class caterer
and has employed courteous, oblig
ing and prompt waiters, looking after
the wants of her guests in person.
Prompt service and good cooking is
her motto. Mrs. Ella McCaddon
Prop,
60-tf
I QUAY AND
ROBERTS
Their Cases Are Beun Today In
the Senate and Lower House
of Congress.
ALL DAY WITH BOTH OF THEM
McKlnley Alarmed and Will Re
ceive a Representative from
South Africa.
NEWS OF THE DAY IN DETAIL
Washington, Jan. 23 The reports
of the committee on elections in the
case of Matthew 9. Quay, who claims
a seat in the United States senate, on
appointment from the governor of
Pennsylvania, were presented In the
senate today. The majority report.
uypumng xne seating or Uuay, was
signed by Senators Caffery, Pettus,
Turley, Harris and Burrows, the laat
named being the only republican
signing it. The minority report bears
the signatures of Senators Hoar.
Chandler, Pritchard and McComas,
all republicans and advocates of giv
ing the seat to Quay.
Washington, Jan: 23 Enormous
crowds were present today to witness
the opening debate In the Roberts'
case. Fully three-fourths of the
spectators were women. The majori
ty resolutions, to exclude Roberts,
and the minority resolutions, to per
mit him to be sworn in and then ex
pelled, were laid before the house
without any agreement as to vote.
Taylor, of Ohio, opened in support of
the majority resolutions
Taylor was emphatic in his asser
tions that exclusion was in harmony
with precedent; expulsion, in viola
tion of it. He amplified the three
grounds for Roberts's exclusion;
First, because of his violation of the
Edmunds act; second, because he was
living, in open, flagrant, notorious
violation oi the statutes of the con
gress he seeks to enter; third, be
cause his election was a violation of
the compact by which Utah was ad
mitted into the union. Littlefleld, of
Maine, on behalf ot the minority
committee, spoke for the minority's
R9i!?BrBr-,efWnomTlBi6irover
keeping Roberts out" of congress.
The only question was as to keeping
him out in an orderly and regular
manner. If the laws and the consti
tution were over-riden, then the way
would be open to over-ride them next
year by excluding a member because
he was an adulterer ,or a representa
tive of a trust.
Washington, Jan. 23 After re
viewing the famous Wilkes case be
fore the British house of commons,
Littlefleld declared that the majority
in the Roberts case were resorting
to the "same infamous instrument of
outrage and oppression." ,
IN CONGRESS.
Senator Ross, of Vermont, Speaks on
the Philippine Question.
Washington, Jan. 23 Senator
Pettigrew offered a resolution calling
on the president to send the senate a
report on Gen. Bate, relating to the
treaty with Sultan Sulu. Among
other things, the resolution asks
whether the Sultan and, his officials
are under the civil service; it went
over. : ' . ..
Senator Caffery presented three
resolutions calling upon the president
for the correspondence he had with
Great Britain concerning the Clayton-
Bulwer treaty; correspondence with
the Colombian government as to the
Panama canal; and the correspond
ence with the new Panama canal com
pany, of France; adopted. A resolu
tion was offered by Senator Allen yes
terday, calling on the secretary of the
treasury for information concerning
the transfer of the old New York cus
tom house to the National City bank
of that city; adopted.
Senator Turner, of Washington, con
eluded his speech on the Philippine
question, begun yesterday. Senator
Ross, of Vermont, then addressed the
senate on his resolution relating to
the Philippines, declaring that the
provisions of the constitution do not.
unaided by act of congress, extend
over Puerto Rico and the Philippines.
The Administration Alarmed.
' New York, Jan. 23 A special to
the "Herald," from Washington, says:
Montague White will be received as
the consular and diplomatic repre
sentative of the South African repub
lic. In receiving White, the state de
partment completely reverses its
policy. The sudden determination to
acknowledge White can only be ac
miirvted for on the theory that the
administration has become alarmed
by the vigorous declaration of pub
lic sentiment throughout the country
Needed His Money.
Washineton. Jan. 23 Some letters
written by Dr. Eetor, of Missoula,
dentist, to Senator Clark, of Mon
tana -were today nresented to the
senate committee on elections, in con
noction with , the investigation of the
Mmrp-oa rf bribery made fi gainst
Clark. Most of the letters related al
irelv to Eetor's efforts to
. 1
..I
t'tr k t -,
I 3
,.-t if. T
r t
i
it 1 r.
E itra Sen ci.
-rl... tVif . J. Jj
!'.! f .'! aa tr ;
r-T t',...--the
I. .;
Lt ! : J
Mothtr 8upriOf Di.
I V; N. Y, Jaa. Jj-Kr
MiXh.-r S-i;.ti..r A:st.w t ..- 1 L
St Jo.-plj f,,nv.r, m-! firu'f ft
Sh lb Mwl.ir if !!!
Sijr of SU Mrr f r th Vul'-i
PtaV tun Ciiu.14 Lant Si-jKm',!.
die r'!hrsu-l the fifU.-th nti-;r
of her corouatlnn.
Hit Lipt Seated.
Paris. Jan. !3Chrl.- ft. M r-
who arrived here yi-ntn!ay. mvi hr
Is nut he barf-r of any ti ,. - or
conimiinli a;iori tnr.n tit Tratsi
authorktii.s. H ciwrtiiui,!y !,, Uh.".!
to nmke ny mtiien!!. Ht? mJ 1
Instrueilons fmra th .t.tt d.-rar:-.
iiit-i.i r aiMiiu!e fcna ii-ri nm ao
dlscretioB.
In th Philippine.
Manila, Jan. J3 Th Amcriran
have occiii.I.M Santa Cnit. Lugun dp
Bay, Iiguna province. It i re
ported that many Insurfienl werr
concentrated there, but the
found deserted. The military rcu
lationg requiring the treeT to be
cleared of native at 8:30 p. m.. have
been changed to 10 o'chx-k.
TWENTY YEARS AGO.
January 23d, 18S3.
Andres Dold would tipen the Frank
Chapman store.
Col. W. II. Seewald had bought C.
W. Mack's property.
R. G. McDonald would not eell hi
mine in the New Placers at nj price
Harry Hegwer had pme over to
Santa Ke to etabllh a branch houi.
Conductor Tom Quigley, afterwards
killed cm the Santa Fe. waa threat
ened with a spell of alekneHS.
Colonel R. W. Webb and Major Mi
guel Salazar, publishers of the "Her
aid," had dissolved partnership.
Meeting With Succe.
Already $350 have been subscribed
for the Elks' banquet at Hotel Casta
neda, Friday night.
About 200 tickets have been Bold
for the mid-winter carnival by the
west-side fire laddies.
William Malboeuf is interesting
himself and receiving timely and
in Las Vegas. The proposition
should go through with a rush.
There's money in it and no better
looation can be obtained.
DUNCAN OPERA HOUSE
B. C. riTTKXGElt, Mgr.
Tuesday, January 23.
CCALCHI,,.
FESTIVAL COMPANY
Including
MME. SOFIA
..SCALCHL
The World's Greatest
.. CONTRALTO
SIG. M. DE PASQUALI,
The eminent tenor.
SIG. A. FRANCESCHETTI,
The distinguished baritone.
CHEVALIER G. LO VERDI,
Pianist to the Queen of Italy.
Musical Director.
Rims. Bernice De Pesquali,
America's Greatest Soprano
' In a Popular Program of
FESTIVAL QEAIS.
PRICES, 75c, $1.00, $1.50.
Duncan house
B. C PITTENGER, Mgr.
Wednesday, Jan'y 24.
LEWIS
MORRISON'S
GRAND METROPOLITAN
PRODUCTION OF
"FAUST"
AA.1aafcaleAAAA AJa JiAAlAAAA JiAafcafcafcJi
VTTTTtTT TTTTttttttt TTTTTT
LAST TIME.
New Scenery and Electri
cal Effects.
o$t est
Patronlce the
Model
Restaurant.
MR3.M.GOIN. Proprtetres
Good Cooklnst. The bst of
waltere employ&d. Evarythlnff
the market, affords on the table.
Board by the day or wrt.
Railroad Atohus, next to Ik
Lewis.
EAtfT LA 3 VEGAS, N. M.
Patronize Nome Industry.
.HERNANDEZ & YOUNG,
xrrr s:r jLfianuraeturing?
imis, iun- f-t . e
u;kcau,, UonieotioiieFS
l-'h-. a:. I f.
Mall Orders
Te'f; !.'ir,e N. 202, Colorado.
First National Bank.
.
1 LAS VEGAS. NEW MEXICO.
JOSHUA S. RAYNOLDS, President.
JOIIti V,. rOLLARS, Vice-President. A. B, SMITH, Cashier
L. F. ADAMS, Assistant Cashier.
Accounts received subject to check.
Interest paid on time deposits.
If Jen want an expreot wHgoa ring
"ii J. J. Crawford. Clay & (Jlvens,
'; t. .i .s. 244-tr
Pit as n I -1 1 and harness repairing,
Ciirriai; trimming, etc., call on J. C.
JuttM. next to S. Patty's, Bridge street
locally famous meals at tne
PUia luttl are equal to the best to
! fo in I anywhere. Superior food,
pr p ired by professional cooks, served
by courteous waiters from snowy
tat leaves nothing to be desired.
K"vf bvhI 1 a pleasant surprise and
t t h-.iiitt delight 136-tf.
I
J
- DO NOT J
r; 3 IMAGINE $
V ' - That eye troubles
, ' .." t In-IHT without
t l'li. Um-jt iret worse. !
S' 'otn ariil liavc vour
i-yi-n lisu-d f&ke;
I in r 3 011 iuhmI gliuisos o. not
ami . ,
t en,
Ion 11111I fining KliEK.
I rIAMKS A. NABB,
ZnM Cplician, 4
5 flxxh SI, n. xl donrto Ktlward Henry, fill
-O --7 Cf S3- CNCS4 OSil
That I have removed my
Restaurant to the Hough
ton Juiilding, and am now
better prepared than efer
to give the. best meals
nil service' in the city.
tlrs. M.J. HUNTER, Prop.
-Houghton Building,
Center Street.
$ GRAND CLEARANCE
This week of all
O bargains in Overcoats, Underwear, Duck
y Coats, Lined Oloves and Wool l2 Hose, i
il Call and be
l( FOX & HARRIS, 5
Sixth
Tlie New "Just Out" 5c
"Straight Ten" 10 cent
KOTE: II win? Uranehed out into the retail business, we are now
prepared t oiler our poods direct to the consumer and the advant
ages of this you will readily realize by stopping in at the
Standard , Cigar Factory.
125 Sixth Street.
B BEST BARGAINS 3
on everything in
I MEN'S WEAR 1
1 winter, mmm i
AT A '2
B ACBJIFICB . 2
in order to make room for '
I Our Spring Stock. 1
I Levis Shoe
4 .
'l!U)Ulil!:H)lll!lllUllllUlUUIIUlUn(
Promptly FiUed.
Northeast Cor; Plaza, Las Vegas
IOOO
Picture Mouldings
JUST RECEIVED.
Quarter Oaks, Photo Frames,
Mats and Mountings.
GEO. T. HILL,
Home 'Phone 140.
latb and National,
BE THANKFUL
VOtJ JultKD NOT
Get It in the Neck
If you -send your linen to the Las
Vegas Steam Laundry.
f"Vo iron the edges of all col
lars and cuffs on a
SPECIAL MACHINE.
Las Vegas Steam Laundry.
Celo. Phone 81.
I.a Vagaa Phone IT
SALE ,
winter goods, Special
Convinced!
Street.
'y' V''
cigar
cigar
.The two leading
brands of our own
manufacture.
, 125 Sixth Street.
ti Cloihing Go. s
f ? a ? i ft o n n n p 1 f r New shoes.
UmUi'iU liUUiil Best, and Best
Advertised Brand in the Country.
Here are Prices to move stock of Fine
Shoes on hand.
The People's Store.
$2.00
50C
For 75c Felt
Slippers.
For Women's vici kid
new Philadelphia toe,
were $2.50
$2.
35
Women's street shoes that
we sold dozens of at 2.75.
Mannish looking shoe.
$1.60
Men's Tan Shoes,
Worth $2.50
Lace Shoes.
Si
Leather
calf-skin, lace
shoe,' heavy
ana
soles.
k
BROWNE
COMPANY,
; (Grocer's
WOOL, HIDES & PELTS
I DEALERS iNJ
ill Kinds of Native Produce
Plows, Harrows, Cultivators,
IcCorniick'sMQWfi:
dray's ihresning:
Hay Rakes. - -
Grain and Wool Bags,
Navajo
HAY, GRAIN
DRIED FRUITS AND VEGETABLES
East Las Vc?;as, N. M. and El Pas 0, Texas.
4
San figuel National BaJ
i
i
i
i
i
i
OF LAS
Capital Paid in
Surplus -
. OFFICERS:
J, M. CUNNINGHAM, President.
FRANK SPRINGER, Vice -President.
D. T. HOSKINS, Cashier.
F. B. JANUARY, Assistant Cashier
i
i
i
i
UyiNTEKEST r AID ON
THE LAS VEGAS
SAVINGS BANK.
Paid up capital, $30,000.
fSF-8ave your earnings by depositing thm In the La Vie a Savihoi
Bank, where tliey will bring you an income. "Every dollar isved la two dollar!
made." No deposits received of less than $1. Interest paid on all deposit of
18 and over. -
Las Vegiis 'Phone 153. Colorado 'I'hone 15.J
JOHN BOOTH,
INIackman
East Las Vsuas Hack Line.
Will call for all Trans. o
o Calls promptly attended to
1
$2.15
Fr Women's finest
vici dresa shoes, hand
turned solts, vest tops,
were $3.25
$2.25
Clover Brand Women's
Shoes, flexible soles, fine and
stylish shoe, worth $2.75
50
2.85
lined
For Hamilton-Brown
and Clover brands Men's
winter shoes that sold
for $3 and $3.50
extended
MANZANARES
una: iTiacnmes.
- Bain Wagons
Baling Ties, Fence Wire, Etc.
Blankets.
AND FEED
VEQAS.J
- -
$100,000
50,000
TIMK UKrOblTB.
Henet Goks, Pres.
H. W. Kelly, Vice Pres.
D. T. Hosxins, Treas.
-
,The ENTERPRISE
CIQAR FACTORY.
We manufacture all of our cigars
out of the best Imported stock, and
employ tbe most skllli-d labor
You can tell what our goods a r
If you call for the
ROUGH RIDER, or
MONTEZUMA CIGARS
For sale at all first-clnss places.
Mall orders promptly attended to
JC all onor address
rftrrrn r
vj. . uujitii, rrup.
BE SURE AID CALL
and see my line of fall milliner; before
purchasing elsewhere. New goodB ar
riving daily. A full line of stamp ma
terials and embroidery silks just re
ceived. it tl i.iUiliiMi

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