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Kansas City journal. [volume] (Kansas City, Mo.) 1897-1928, August 27, 1899, Image 10

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THE KANSAS CITY JOURNAL, SUNDAY. AUGUST 27, 1899.
KZ2028S3
!
i
T LA
PICNIC SALE!
T 11 1 1 TV 1 1 T T T mi T Tiir i . 1 1 IkNs
S3 it will be a royal bargain picnic. .Labor v&y is a legal nonaay. tms store observed tne nrst one alter tne law was enacted, and has observed every as
SS one sirifce. Next Monday, September 4th, is the national holiday of Labor Day. On that day this store "will not be opeii. On that day every boy, girl, man and -woman in this store, from proprietor to door vS
NS boy, will be turned loose to celebrate the lioliday as they see fit and their wages go on just the same. We're going to have this big Labor Day Sale for Wo reasons: First is to sell all the goods -we can, lN
xs ana, second, to educate our puonc tnat swarms tnrougn tms store every -ween: tnat jauor aay snouia De ODservea tne same as j?ourtn 01 Juiy, nanKsgiving and Christmas. Ave -want to educate our public
SS that on this day the brain worker and the pick and shovel man, the stenographer in the great office buildings, and the seamstress in the cottage, the pro-
NS prietors of great industrial institutions and the armies of their employes should all everyone get out and enjoy this day of freedom from brain and
SS muscular toil. To emphasize our belief in this doctrine of rest and recuperation we shall hold a six days' carnival of cash bargain selling. You'll find
SS the things offered in this sale will be useful for the observance of this great September holiday.
JONES DRY GOODS CO.
10
I 1 A V
1 Ay!Ls.fer 0"?orrow morn"1Sr 11 ft. wffl r"nsfe .Zs:. Ill ft. y?!!-.gr1-"J?J- Saturday night.
sxr: :
fS3SSSS$3$3
31 JP
urniture
Piece Goods for Present and Future
PIECE GOODS NEEDS ARE NEVER THICKER THAN AT THIS TIME OF
summer. One Is sure to discover that It la most desirable to build a few mora
summer gowns to vary the worry of keeping cool and beautiful. Our late sum
mer prices justify you In that late summer dressmaking resolve. Then there are
the autumn garments possibly some things for "school wear that must be hurried
through to say nothing about the matter of bedcoverings which have to be ready
Derore com weatner. All tnese needs are met here now with cut prices mat be'
fittingly mark the advent of our great six-day Labor Day Sale. A few samples
iiousefurnishings Department.
THE WANING OP SUMMER MEANS NO WANING OF
I the people's interest in this three-floor department We're
NJ keeping up too lively a hacking of prices to ever let the pub
JS lie lose interest in our transforming' this part of the house from
s an exposition of summer -wants to a similar display for winter.
w If you -wait for prices to get any lower than this low level the
SS things you want may escape. A rousing list to open this Labor
S Day Sale:
I
IS
ss
Knives and Forks.
KNIVES AND FORKS. HARD-
wood handle, rood steel blade, set of '
6, -worth 55c Labor Day sale price.2ic '
ROGERS' TRIPLE PLATE KNIVES '
and Forks, every piece guaranteed '
hand burnished, set of 6. usually sold '
for $3.50,' Labor Day sale $2.75
Dishes.
COPS AND SAUCERS. ENGLISH
porcelain, neat shape, good value at
lor set of e. Labor uay sale price,
31c
INCH PLATES. BEST GRADE
ironstone china, set of 6, 'worth 43c,
Monday price 3.1a
S-INCH VEGETABLE BOWLS, 20c
value, for I2u
Of Granite Iron.
15c GRANITE IRON WASHPAN.
for. each Ko
3-QUART GRANITE IRON PUD-
dlng pan 10o
NO. 7 GRANITE IRON TEAKET-
tle . ?..33o
1-QUART GRANITE IRON MEAS-
ure pan 10c
3-QUART GRANITE IRON MEAS-
ure Teapot. 3Sc size, for 20c
GRANITE IRON DRINKING CUPS,
10c kind. Labor Day sale Bo
GRANITE IRON BASTING SPOON.
Labor Day sale price So
Glass Jars, etc
l-QUART MASON FRUIT JARS,
early season price 53c dozen. Labor
Day sale price, each 2ic
-PINT TIN TOP JELLY GLASSES.
Labor Day sale, each 1
Of, Wood and Hemp.
8-INCH SCRUB BRUSHES, 7c KIND,
Labor Day sale 4c
NO. 3 OAK GRAIN WOOD TUBS,
43c size 2:c
HEAVY ZINC WASHBOARD, 20c
kind lOo
.WOOD FRAME CLOTHES WRING-
ers, $L75 value. Labor Day sale
price : 98e
LABOR DAY SALE MUST CLOSE
out Hammocks:
$1.25 Hammocks for 7.1o
$1.00 Hammocks for GOo
SSc Hammocks for SOo
Furniture is rising in price and rising fast no one dis
putes that. Therefore it is with especial gratification that
we announce the receipt of our first great shipment of
Furniture specially ordered by us many months ago or
dered on the earnest solicitation of three different manu
facturers who persistently claimed that they must have
orders to keep their hands employed during the dull months. That was when wood, hard
ware, glass and (the pity of it) even wages were lower. With others all around us pushing
up their retail prices as fast as they can, we are now plunging into a great campaign of
lowest cash selling, because we have ordered and coming at the old prices more than twice
the amounts of furniture we sold in the past twelve months. We bought 33 per cent under
the ruling prices of last spring. If you now buy regular outside of this store you are taking
on additional lots through the recent advances of 60 per cent on lumber, 30 per cent on glass
and 100 per cent on hardware. To open the Labor Day sale we display a few of our
matchless money savers.
Miscellany.
1
TO-MORROW WE INAUGURATE A MAMMOTH SALE OF
S strictly high grade meats. Packers' prices have been con-
sianuy au.va.ncmg tu uucu an extent as to maice tne ngures ai-
1 GALLON EARTHENWARE JARS,
10c values So
2-POUND BUTTER JARS, OF 7c
value, for 3o
TINNED METAL LEMON SQUEEZ-
ers. 10c kind So
ICE PICKS, POLISHED HANDLE,
steel pick. 7c kind, for 3c
1-GALLON FLARING TIN PAILS,
10c values, for So
"White Enamel Iron
mounting1, full size,
worth $3.75,
at
Beds, brass
$2.39
most Drohibitive. "We. have made irn our minds in mvp. vnn fh?
--, A j- - 0-. j .
o best meats tnat money can ouy tor to-morrow, at prices less
NX than the packers will sell in carload lots. Read this list:
I
STRICTLY FANCY NO. 1 HAMS.
guaranteed in every respect, mild,
sweet, pleasant cure, lb Oe
CHOICE SELECTED STRIJ-S OF
Bacon, well cured, well smoked, beau
tifully streaked with lean, lb So
DRY SALT PORIv.' WELL CURED
and sweet, the Tegular 10c kind. lb..Sc
We .have plenty' of these meats and
can supply your wants all day to-mor
row.
SAPOLIO, A CAKE B"c
PILLSBURVS VITOS. SUMMER
Breakfast Food, pkg 10c
WHITE EXTRA C SUGAR, 21
pounds - .'.... .ffl.00
SAprius uvrajsu. id aoc
WINDSOR BLEND COFFEE. 7 lbs
for $1.00, per lb .15a
MOCHA AND JAVA. PLEASANT,
delightful, rich and full bodied, 4Vi lbs
for J1.00, lb .-. 23c
CREAM OF PATENTS FLOUR.
guaranteed high patent. cwt....lf2.00
UKASIliK O UJ.UU JPAllSMX.tJl-ttlt;'!.-
ly high grade, cwt j 82. IS
ROYAL NO. 10, cwt $2.45
KILN DRIED GRANULATED CORN
-Meal, 20 ids 25c
WATER QUEEN SOAP, 11 bars..S5c
FLOSS SOAP. LARGE 5c BARS OF
excellent quality, 10 bars 25c
GOLD DUST WASHING POWDER,
4-lb pkg l.-.c
SCOURENE. THE GREAT SCOUR-
lng Soap, cake 4c
FANCY LOOSE MUSCATEL RAIS-
lns, 4 lbs 25c
LARGE, BRIGHT MEATY, JUICY
Prunes, per lb c
ROLLED WHITE OATS, U lbs.. .25c
LARGE HEAD RICE, 4 lbs 25c
FANCY COLUMBIA RIVER SAL
mon, solid, pink flaky meat, 15c can,
each lSVso
OIL SARDINES, can 3c
FRENCH IMPORTED SARDINES. i
cans ioo
3-LB CAN BAKED PORK AND
Beans, guaranteed in every way,
can 7c
FANCY FULL CREAM CHEESE,
lb 12Uc
10-LB PAIL PURE LEAF LARD.680
White Enamel Iron Beds, full size,
brass mounting', ff Q A Q
worth $4.00, S)Z."0
at
White Enamel Iron Beds, clover
leaf pattern, brass (tt r fQ
knobs, full size. in i B if 11
worth S5.00, at IVJ.U
Solid Oak Dining' Chairs, cane seat,
seven spindles and carved ( f
crosspieces in the back, ijMC
Dressers, antique finish, with three
large drawers, square or round,
German plate mirror, fj "7 ( O
a regular S9.00 Dl.DO
dresser, at ,vv
Solii Oak Chiffonier, five large
ished, carved top, i)t TO
worth 56, at
Solid Oak Rocker, 11 spindles and '
two carvea cross-
pieces in back, cobbler ,
seat, worth S3.00, at. . .
Fancy Couch, upholstered in Cor-
1 auroy, 4 rows oi tutt
ing, trimmed in j
fringe, worth S8.i
Solid Oak Center Table, 24-inch
top, nicely polished, ftt g t r)
worth 81.75, iPll.ZjJ
Folding Sewing Table,
nicely polished, scale
measiire, worth S9c, at..
Child's High Chair, with swinging,
table, finished antique rTii ia
and red, worth regular Tti rj
$1.50, at vyi.i v
Carpets and
Mattings.
He
CHOICE OF ANY KIND OF
Wash Goods in our house, such as
Lawns, Dimities, Organdies. White
and F-incv P. K.. goods we have sold
from 5c to 25c yard, Monday Be
CHOICE OF ANY PERCALE IN
our house. liKht or dark, dress, skirt
and waist patterns. 32x36 Inches. In- '
cludlnir Windsors. Sea Islands. White
Star and French Percales, our prices '
every day are loc. liVsc ana Ijc yara.
Monday choice for lOo
BIG ASSORTMENT OF WHITE
Goods, more or less soiled and mussed '
from handling, values from V&c to
12Vc yard. Monday 514c
AMERICAN. BLUE. RED AND
Fancy Dress Prints, in large variety
of patterns, in the Labor Day sale,
yard 5o
FROM SEVEN DIFFERENT MAN-
ufacturers and agents we secured
these samples of Blankets to select
our fall stock from. In the lot we
Have all kinds from the shoddy ones
to the finest white, pink and blue, all
wool. California Blankets, worth
$15.00; no two alike and prices smash-
ea on an or tnem.
BLACK AND WHITE MOURNING
Prints, Labor Day sale price 4c
OUTING FLANNELS. BLUE AND
pink stripes, excellent cloth, zs inches
wide. 714c value, Monday, yard 5c
ZEPHYR GINGHAMS. IS AND
inches wide, good assortment of pat
terns, excellent value at 10c and 12H-C
yard. Monday To
VVHITH DOIIET OK SHAKK
FLANNEL, Labor Day special sale
4o
A BIG CLEANUP OF ZEPHYR
Ginghams, elegant patterns, fine
sheer cloth, regular values 19c and
25c yard. Labor Day sale price 10c
TURKEY RED TABLE DAMASK,
oil color, imported, worth 45c yard.
Monday 20o
SHEETS. MADE OF THE BEST
Pepperell Muslin. Slx90 30c
BLEACHED SHEETS, 81x90. MADE
of best Muslin, selling In this city
at 6flc each. Labor Day sale price.SOo
PILLOW CASES. ANY SIZE,
made and hemmed ready for use, THc
and 8 l-3c ones. Monday. 4 for 25o
BIG LOT OF DRESS GOODS, 36.
3S and 40 inches wide. Including some
all wool novelties, hilf wool brocades,
etc., excellent patterns, dark styles,
wanted for children's school dresses.
Labor Day price, yard lOo
1
1
30 CO
if! J
1
Fancy Check China Mat
ting, regular loc value,
at
tf?E$5.98
Extra heavy Ingrain Car- n rj
pet, good line of patterns, ijC
worth 35c, at...'. a-wv
Ingrain Carpet, very heavy,
splendid line ot patterns
regular 4Uc value, at.
A FEELING OF SINCERE PLEASURE PERVADES THESE MEN'S DE
partments over the receipt of the order from headquarters to smash prices for
a six-day Labor Day Sale. This order is to affect practically every line of goods
carried. Clothing for men. youths ana boys: Hats lor au. ana Mens ana Uovs
Furnishings. Although most men prefer to do their trading the latter part of the
week, we reel that these inducements oemg so ceciaea as tney are, are sunt'
clent to keep the department crowded ror six aays.
MEN'S FINE 75c UNDERSHIRTS,
in this sale for 30a
MEN'S UNLINED ALL WOOL
69c
Tapestry Brussels Carpet,
beautiful line of patterns,
worth 75c, at
Chenille Rugs, all fancy,
bright colors, size 14xd.
worth 50c, at
:29c
52c
S23c
K$$e3t-$s$ms
NORTHEAST CORNER SKTH AND MAIN STREETS, KANSAS CITY, MO.
I
Clothing, Hats, Furnishings. Sj
1ELING OF SINCERE PLEASURE PERVADES THESE MEN'S DE- So
SINS
he NS
5
10c. 3 S
...25c
IKER- S
I
MEN'S HATS, STIFF AND SOFT,
popular shapes, tourist, pasha, eta,
$2.00 values; 6-days' sale price..?1.25
LITTLE BOYS' FANCY CAPS,
bluo and fancy colors, 35c values:
Labor Day sale pricej 20c
MEN'S $1.00 CRASH PANTS, LABOR
Day sale price (iOc
MEN'S FINE LIGHT WEIGHT
Pants, marked $3.00; this sale
price ?2.00
MEN'S BLACK UNION CLAYWOR-
sted Pants, sizes up to 42 waist: $1.50
values for JJ1.00
BOYS' ALL WOOL SUITS, RE
duced from $150 in this Sale to..?l.C5
$2.00 ALPACA COATS, THIS SALE.
91.25
Suits, marked $7.50: in th!s'sale.?4.75
MEN'S SILK FRONT SHHITS. $1.00
kind; Labor Day sale price will be
C3c
BOYS' NEGLIGEE SHIRTS. LINK
Cuffs; 50c kind; Labor Day sale price
35c
BOYS' WAISTS. "MOTHERS'
Friend," new percales, 75c kind, for
SOc
LINEN COLLARS IN ALL LATE
shapes. Labor Cay sale price
for
MEN'S CAMBRIC HANDKER
chiefs, plain or bordered. 3 for..10o
MEN'S 25c SUSPENDERS, LABOR
Day salo price 18c
Paper, Paints, Draperies.
THE LABOR DAY SALE OPENS WITH A LOT OF EYE-PLEASING- HOME
wants in reach of very slender purses. A moment's reflection wilt satisfy, too.
that lt is not useless articles tnat we are talking to you about on such a low cash
basis. These paints, wall. papers, portieres, curtains, shades, etc.. are precisely
the same things that are offered to you uptown with big profits added. Labor
Day Sale savings:
1,500 ROLLS WHITE BLANK WALL ;
Paper, in full combinations, several ,
different patterns to pick from, worth ,
514c and 6c a roll, Labor Day salo ,
price 2i,5c i
GARLAND BRAND ROOF AND
Barn Paint, sold everywhere for $1.00
a gallon; our price in the Labor Day
salo OOc.
GARLAND BRAND LIQUID WOOD
Filler, no better made, worth $1.50 gal
lon; Labor Day sale ?l.t)0
RED STAR ST. LOUIS WHITE
Lead, sells everywhere at 5c lb.: our
price, 100 lbs for .". 93.25
ODD LACE CURTAINS, 315 YARDS
long by 50 Inches wide; worth up to
$2.25 pair; choice of lot in the Labor
Day sale, pair OSo
ROPE PORTIERES SUITABLE FOR
a 4 or 5 foot opening, a regular $1.93
Portiere, to-morrow, for. OSo
FELT WINDOW SHADES, WORTH
15c: our price to-morrow 71o
BRASS EXTENSION CURTAIN
Rods, extend from 24 to 44 Inches;
worth 10c; price to-morrow So
PALLAS IS READY
"WILL SOOST 3IAKE HER ENTRY INTO
KANSAS CITY.
"JACKSON" RISES TO REMARK
WANTS TO KNOW TO WHOM INVITA
TIONS ARE TO BE SENT.
Knrntval Krerre Actively at Work
Muaio Will Aealn Be a. Feature
of the Knrnival A Grand.
Mnalc Ball to Be Held
This Year.
to figure on their decorations for Carnival
week, and many have already decided to
have the work done by the official deco
rators of the K. K K. More interest than
usual seems to be felt among the owners
of larce office buildings. The city park
board will spread itself in the way of flags
and other suitable decorations In the parks
and public squares.
Music will again be a feature of the car
nival, and sixteen bands have already been
engaged for the parade, and a band of
forty pieces will play In Convention hall for
the carnival ball. The chairman of the
music committee has received applications
from over 100 bands all over the West and
Southwest for representation in tho fes
tivities. Much interest is being shown in the
grand masked ball of the Karnival Krewe,
and to those outside of Kansas City ad
mission will ba only upon special invita
tion, and it is likely that a generous space
will be reserved for spectators. Exhibi
tion space in the street fair is still selling
rapidly, and the directory announces that
bids for concessions will be received only
a few days longer.
The Krewe expects to btgin the grading
of the vacant lots on Baltimore avenue
for the street fair, and bids have been
called for in that connection.
The Priests of Pallas posters, a reproduc
tion of which was given In The Journal
three weeks ago, have been received from
the printers and will be distributed to-morrow.
The first Installment consists of 20,000
of the posters and it is probable that more
will be ordered within a few weeks. Priests
of Pallas headquarters begins to assume a
bulness-like air that betokens many mya.
tcrlous actions of "Mr. Jackson." who is
the chief mundane representative of Pallas
Athene.
Since the beginning of the construction
of the twenty floats for the Priests of Pal
las parade, work has gone forward rapidly
and now it is announced that nearly every
thing Is ready for the triumphant entrance
of the goddess Into the city of her adoption.
The twenty-two bands that will enliven
the parade have all been engaged and other
preliminaries arranged until nothing re
mains except to beat the tom-tom and wave
the mystic wand that will bring forth tho
beautiful and wierd procession from the
somber doors of the "den."
"Mr. Jackson" also whispers from under
the hemp whiskers of his mask that all
who have subscribed to the Priests of Pal
las fund should send in the names of thoso
to TVhom they wish Invitations sent. These
Invitations carry out the association's idea
to furnish a handsome souvenir invitation
each year that may be kept as a useful and
pretty memento of the goddess' yearly visit
to Kansas City. This year the committee'
has been particularly fortunate In Its se
lection and It is safe to say that none of
those who are lucky enough to receive the
Invitation souvenir this year will be dis
appointed. ,
Railroads have agreed to make a special
rate for the fall festivities within a radius
of "250 miles to the east and north and 300
miles to the south and west.
"Mr. Jackson" said yesterday: "The ball
this year will, of course, be the crowning
feature of tho week's enjoyment. For the
first time In our experience of twelve years
we have now a suitable place to hold the
ball. We are going to sprend on lt and lt
will be an occasion long to be remembered
by those who attend.
Krewe In Active.
Merchants of Kansas City are beginning
THIRD REGIMENT MUSTER.
Members of the Popnlnr Organization
Will Assemble in Convention
Hall To-morrow Evening.
The assembly of the Third regiment In
Convention hall to-morrow evening will be
a public function. The twelve companies
of the popular regiment will be inspected
and the officers will appear In blue fatigue
uniform, with cap and sidearms. After
tho inspection the Third Regiment band
will hold its concert. Instead of on Glad
stone boulevard as heretofore announced.
In order to avoid confusion Lieutenant
Colonel Charles E. Wagar has issued the
following orders for the guidance of mem
bers of the regiment and the public:
First The held, staff and line officers,
also members ot the band and various
companies of the Third, regiment, will be
admitted into Convention hall, Monday
night. August 2S, from entrance No. 3, and
tho general public through entrance No.
2. Both entrances are on the Thirteenth
street side.
Second To avoid confusion members
will take their families and friends to en
trance No. 2, and gain admission to the
floor at the entrance for the regiment.
No. 3.
Third The officers of the regiment will
appear in blue fatigue uniform, with cap
and sidearms.
Fourth Through the courtesy of the
park board, after the Inspection the band
will hold Its concert in Convention hall
Instead of on Gladstone boulevard, and the
general public is cordially Invited to enjoy
muster nnd Inspection, and also the band
concert in Convention hall.
Fifth Members of the regiment who
have not been notified by their company
commanders, and others who desire to be
come members of the regiment, are re
quested to be on hand promptly at S o'clock
so that they may be assigned to their dif
ferent companies.
St. Aloyla Choir.
Mrs. Marie L. Boucher, who has been en
gaged as organist by St. Aloysius church,
corner of Eleventh street and Prospect
avenue, will conduct the choir sen-ices at
the high mass and vespers to-day. There
will be a reorganization of the church
choir under Mrs. Boucher, and it is ex
pected that her engagement will draw
much fine talent to it. She will hold re
hearsals for the choir every Wednesday
evening at the church. Applications for
membership in the new chcrfr. from good
voices, are solicited, and may be addressed
to Mrs. Boucher. 600 New Ridge building,
or to Rev.- Mr. John C. Kelly, 1107 Pros
pect avenue.
SUNDAY SCHOOL WORK
WILL BE DISCUSSED AT A BIG MEET.
ING THIS "WEEK.
Convention Will Hold Its Opening
Sessions Tuesday Workers From
All Over the State Will Be
In Attendance.
The thirty-fourth annual convention of
the Missouri Sunday School Association,
composed of all the Sunday school workers
of tho state, will meet at Kansas City, Au
gust 29, 30 and 31, in Calvary Baptist church
at Ninth and Harrison streets. Kansas City
has had two of these conventions in the
thirty-four years the association has ex
isted, the last one being held here 111 1ST6.
If the attendance is large enough, part ot
the sessions Will be held at Central Pres
byterian church and every part of Sunday
school work will be discussed and illus
trated. The convention will begin its work Tues
day morning at 10 o'clock with a meeting of
the executive committee and at 11 o'clock
there will be a conference of county ana
township officers and field workers, con
ducted by L. L. Allen, state secretary. At
2 p. m. the convention will be formally
opened by Edwin L. Browne, president
Kansas City Sunday School Union. A re
sponse will be made by Frank P. Hays,
president state association.
This will be followed by report of the
home department, by Rev. Mr. M. Inlow, ot
Harrlsonvllle; report of State Secretary, L.
L. Allen, of Pierce City; an nddress, "How
to Secure and Maintain an Excellent Sun
day School Attendance," by Bradford H.
Cox, of Kansas City; report of state su
perintendent. Rev. Mr. A. P. George.
At the closo1 of the first day's proceed
ings there will be an lnfounal reception to
the primary and junior teachers tendered
by the Kansas City Primary Union, in the
parlors of the Cavalry Baptist church.
Beginning at 7:30 in the evening there will
be praise service led by Kansas City Sun
day school chorus, an address by President
Frank P. Hays, report of executive com
mitter and an address. "State and Interna,
tional Work." by Professor H. H. Hamill,
international field secretary.
Programme for Rest of Week.
The following will be the programme for
the rest of the week:
Wednesday forenoon Primary session.
Mrs. L. L. Allen, state primary superin
tendent, presiding. 9:00, devotional service
Mrs. G. B. Wheeler, president, Kansas
City Primary Union. 9:15, "The Teacher's
Study ot the Child" Miss Nellie Hurst.
Kansas City. 9:10, address "Teacher
Training" Mrs. W. J. Semelroth. St
Louis, president International primary de
partment. 10:15. music. 10:3), Primary
work in the Country Mrs. L. L. Allen,
Pierce City. Annual report of state pri
mary superintendent. 11:10. address
"Spiritual Results in Junior Work" Mrs.
M. G. Kennedy, Philadelphia, Pa. 11:55,
closing prayer hymn.
Wednesday afternoon 1:00 to 2:00, con
ference primary and junior teachers, in
Sunday school room. Calvary Baptist
church. 1:30. devotional, Bible meditation.
2:00, report of state treasurer, Mr. Hobart
Brinsmade. 2:15. "The Future of Our
State Work" Rev. Dr. O. M. Stewart.
Kansas City. 3:30, "How I Will Teach
Next Sunday's Lesson" (illustrated) Pro
fessor H. M. Hamill. 4:00, conference of
superintendents, led by Mr. R. G. Hogan,
St. Louis. 4:00, the children's hour, con
ducted by Mrs. Kennedy, at Central Pres
byterian church.
Wednesday evening 7:30, Praise service,
led by Kansas City Sunday school chorus.
$:O0, report of committee on nominations.
8:15, address "The Bible, the True Basis
of Education," Rev. Dr. J. T. McFarland,
Topeka. 8:45, address "How the Sunday
School Can Advance the Temperance
Cause," Mrs. Clara C. Hoffman, president
Missouri W. C. T. U.
Thursday forenoon 9:00, Devotional Bi
ble meditation. 9:15. three eight minute
papers "How Wo Interest tho Boys of Our
School," C. J. Smith, Carl Junction; "Good
Points I Have Found In the Teachers in
Our School," Judge Noah M. Glvan. Har
risonville: "How We Increased Our At
tendance Last Year." A. H. Culver, Butler.
10:00, discussion. 10:20, "Our Normal Work."
reported, illustrated and discussed, by W.
J. Semelroth, state normal superintendent.
11:20, address "The Biblo and Civilization,"
Rev. Mr. Grant A. Robblns, Macon.
Thursday afternoon 1:00 to 2:00, confer
ence of primary and junior teachers (in the
Sunday school room of Calvary Baptist
church). 1:30, devotional Bible meditation.
1:15, unfinished business and reports. 2:00,
conference "How We Secured Home Study
of the Lesson," "How We Maintain a
Teachers' Meeting;" "How We Made a
Success of Our Adult Class" Led by R. H.
Waggener, Kansas City. 2:45, address "Tho
Evolution of a Boy, or the Boy Problem,"
Rev. Mr. F. O. Fannon. St. Louis. 3:00, dis
cussion. 3:30. "What I Have Seen and
Heard in this Convention," Mispah.
Snntlny School Conference.
During tho progress of the convention
there will be each day a conference of the
primary and junior teachers in the Sunday
school room of the Calvary Baptist church
from 1 to 2 p. m.. when the following pro
grammes will be carried out:
Tuesday noon Topic, "Primary Class
Work." Mrs. L. L. Allen, presiding. "Teach
ing Little Children to Sing." Mrs. C. E. Al
len. With the mothers "Cradle Roll, Home
Department. Mothers' Meetings, Children's
Socials." Mrs. W. J. Evans. Discussion,
"Essentials for Good Class Work," Mrs.
J. C. Turk. Questions and answers ques
tion drawer, Mrs. M. G. Kennedy.
Wednesday noon Topic, "Union Work,"
Mrs. W. J. Semelroth, presiding. Roll call
of primary unions. Responses by union
representatives. Discussion, "Ways of
Working in Primary Unions," "Pro
grammes," "Social Music." "Mothers'
Meetings," "Financial," "Topic Work."
"The Junior, Teacher in Our Unions," Mrs.
M. G. Kennedy. The children's hour will
be conducted by Mrs. Kennedy at 4:30 in
the Central Presbyterian church.
Thursday noon Topic. "Junior Work."
Mrs. M. Park, presiding. Opening prayer
for junior classes. Discussion Topic.
"What to Do With Our Primary Grad
uates," led by Mrs M. G. Kennedy. Sup
plemental lesson Commandments taught,
by Mrs. Jennie Conway. Report of nomi
nating committee and election of officers.
Committees In Churge.
The following are the committees in
charge of the meeting:
Executive committee Charles F. Schley,
chairman; George N. Elliott, R. F. Mc-
Uiotnian, jonn uoggett, a. v. maer.
Finance' committee S. J. Bunker, chair
man: Charles Marshall, D. C. Stephenson.
E. McD. Colvln, S. E. Rumble, J. R.
Miller.
Reception committee David B. Kirk,
chairman: F. P. Neal. vice chairman; A.
E. Douglass, C. B. Norton. Mrs. G. B.
Wheeler. George S. Graham, Mrs. F. J.
Case, R. T. Morrison. Mrs. Edwin L.
Browne. P. E. Parrott, Miss Katherlne
Baer, C. B. Dart, Mrs. Frank Hagerman,
J. A. Child, Mrs. John W. Coontz, A. O.
T. Pennington, Mrs. B. D. Smoot. George
A. Remley, Miss Katherlne Parrlsh, A. G.
Wickens, Miss Katherlne Gillespie, Xex
McDanlel, Mrs. C. M. Allen. T. W. Hous
ton. Miss Delia Drake, F. S. Foster, Mrs.
Willard P. Holmes. J. W. Jenkins, F. L.
Dole, Mrs. A. D. Mann, J. E. Threlkeld,
Mrs. E. McD. Colvln. F. W. Segur.-Mrs.
F. E. Hughson, A. B. Colton, Mrs. L. G.
A. Copley, Dr. J. W. McKee, Mrs. O. H.
Bilger, I. N. Wagner, Miss Ada Irons, C.
H. Nowlln, Mrs. E. J. Penfleld, John W.
Moats. Mrs. C. E. Moats, A. F. Wright,
Mrs. J. AV. Love. Mrs. W. N. PIttman,
Miss Lida Smoot, Miss Sallie Seawcll, Miss
Florence Eubank.
Entertainment committee C. A. Hugh
son, chairman: J. H. North, vice chairman;
H. M. Beardslev, S. A. Boyer. Mrs. John
Doggett, Willard P. Holmes, L. A. Good
man, Mrs. A. A. Buxton, F M. Furgason,
S. A. Pierce. Mrs. George W. Fuller. F.
M. Weaver, Miss Mary Rood. Adelbert P.
Nichols, C. A. Young, Mrs. W. H. Graham,
C. E. Brown, T. E. Bryant. Mrs. J. M. Cro
mer. Will S. Woods, Mrs S. A. Northrop,
W. H. Reed. L. S. Cady, Mrs. Hannah Mil
ler, A. U. Jacobr, Mrs. E. S. Porterfleld,
F. M. Lowe, Miss Bess M. Page, J D.
Gloutrh. Clyde E. Hunt.
Registration committee Fred N. Tufts,
chairman; J. F. Russell, B. F. Black. II.
R. Ennis, J. Carver Jones,. Hugh Puckett,
J. C. Williams. G. R. Jordan. W. F. Stone.
Printing committee G. M. Jordan, chair
man: H. B. Jones. Charles M. Lewis.
Pages Dudley Black, chairman: Wallacs
Downing. Howard Tufts. Everett Copley.
Pryor Combs, Edward North, Robert Ma
son. Ushers D. P. Hunter, chairman; G. P.
Norton. O. H. Bllger. C. H. Haln, Ernest
Threlkeld, S. R. Waller, A. H. Clark, Ern
est Forbes. Joseph Harriman, Allen Austin,
Fred DImmitt.
"GREAT ROCK ISLAND ROUTE."
930.85 New Yorlc nnd Return 930.85
$28.83 Philadelphia nnd
Return 928.8S.
The Great Rock Island Route will sell
round trip tickets to the above named cities
September 1. 2 and 3, good to return until
September 30, with liberal stopover priv
ileges. Before completing your arrangements to
make the trip It will be to your Interest to
call at the Rock Island ticket offices, 900
Main st., and 1030 Union avenue.
A. H. MOFFET.-G. S. W. P. A..
Kansas City, Mo.
Mr. Utile's Mounted Engle.
W. A. Rule, cashier of the National Bank
of Commerce, has been presented with a
beautiful mounted eagle by John Y.
Wough, cashier of the Security bank, of
Eskridge, Kas. The specimen is one of
the finest ever brought to Kansas City,
and It will be placed In the private collec
tion ot Mr. Rule. In a letter that accom
panied the eagle Mr. Wough says that the
bird was killed eight miles west of Esk
ridge. It had attacked a little girl, leav
ing the marks ot Its talons In the child's
cheek. Tho doctor who was called to at
tend tha child's wound killed the eagle.
Blcctrlc Fun Causes n Nnlsance.
A. W. Miller, the proprietor of a restaur
ant at S13 Main street, was fined $10 in the
police court yesterday morning for main
taining a nuisance. Miller's restaurant !
In the rear of Studebaker's salesrooms on
Walnut street., and the managers and em
ployes of that firm were the principal wit
nesses against him. They claimed that
Miller kept an electric fan running In the
kitchen of his restaurant and that his fan
drove the smoke and dirt into the build
ings across the way. Miller was given a
stay on his promise to abate the nuisance.
Commercial Adjustment nnd Credit
Co., 041 N. Y. Life Bldjr.
We can collect your doubtful or bad ac
counts, corresponding attorneys In every
state and county, city collections a spe
cialty. Drop us a card and get listing
blanks and list your collections with us.
,
No' change of cars to Philadelphia via
Chicago & Alton railroad, September 1st,
2d and 3d. Rate, $2S.S5 for the round trip,
trip.
AN UNJUST MEASURE
SO W. B. THAYER DECLARES DE
PARTMENT STORE LAW.
Contributes an Interesting Article to
the Dry Goods Economist, In
Which. He Discusses tha
Matter Thoroughly.
In an interesting article contributed to
the last Issue of the Dry Goods Econo
mist, W. B. Thayer, of the Emery-Blrd-Thayer
Dry Goods Company, discusses the
recent department store law as follows:
"Tho Missouri legislature, before ad
journment In May, passed a bill commonly
known as tho department store bill, which
became a law 120 days after May 16. By
this act an attempt Is mado to classify
all lines of goods usually kept in depart
ment stores, and these classes formed into
groups, of which there are twenty-eight,
and Axes a tax of not less than $300 nor
mora than $500 on each group. Some of the
provisions of the bill are: It shall only
apply to cities, having a population of
50,000 or over; it shall not apply to estab
lishments where not more than fifteen per
sons are employed.
"The injustice and Iniquity of such a law
is plainly visible, fraught with dangers on
all sides, many of which can only dimly
be foreseen. And while directed in this
Instance at the department stores, such
legislation Is a threatening menace to ev
ery industry in the land. If the smaller
merchants are protected against the big
stores, the mechanic might, with equal
justice, claim protection against tha large
industrial concerns; the stage driver
against the railroad: the blacksmith
against the great forges; the shoemaker
against the large shoe factories, and so on.
And where would be the end? Any taxa
tion, the object of which Is to prescribe
the limit of business enterprise, is sub
versive to public interests, and, above all,
a violation of those inalienable rights guar
anteed by our constitution.
"The signers of the Declaration of Inde
pendence declared that. 'All men are cre
ated equal; that they are endowed by
their Creator with certain inalienable
rights: and among these are life, liberty
and the pursuit of happiness.' The same
principles are reiterated in the constitu
tion of the United States. 'Nor shall any
state deprive any person of life, liberty or
property without due process of law."
"Then, again, the constitution of Mis
souri emphasizes such principles and de
clares that 'AH persons have a natural right
to life, liberty and enjoyment of tho gains
of their own Industry: that to give secur
ity to these things is the principal office of
government, and that when government
does not confer this security, lt falls of Its
chief design.'
"The word 'liberty' here used do3 not
simply mean freedom from incarceration
or slavery, but is used in its broadest
sense, intending to confer those rights of
liberty of action so essential to our happi
ness. It means that an American citizen
may engage in any occupation or business
he chooses, conduct lt as he pleases, so
long as he does not encroach upon the
rights and privileges of others. The big
stores have proven successful, and will go
on steadily increasing in business. The
people generally like them, they like to go
where they can buy many articles cheap
ly, and the best evidence that they are a
benefit Is that people patronize them. If
they did not they could not exist.
"The small stores, where properly man
aged with sufficient capital, do weft; fully
as well In proportion as some large ones.
There Is room for both. But a few, who
spend most of their time In denouncing tha
big stores, are perhaps the least competent
to manage small ones. All canrot be big
department stores, necessarily most store3
must be small ones, and most men must
me satisfied with making a living. There 13
'room on top.' The history of nearly all. If
not all. of the big department stores show
that they began In a very small way. So
let those who are dissatisfied with their
lot aspire to higher achievements and get
in tho procession, for the big department
stores, the true method of merchandising,
have come to stay. W. B. THAYER."
HE 0RGANIZEDSUIT CLUBS.
John Donellr nnd a Customer Dis
agree, With the Result That
Former Is Arrested.
John Donnelly was arrested yesterday
by Officers Snead and Callahan on a state
warrant issued by Justice Walh?, charging?
him with obtaining money under false pre
tenses. Until a week ago Donnelly was
employed by the American Tailoring Com
pany, at Seventh and Main streets, in. or
ganizing suit clubs.
L. Levison. a saloonkeeper at Third and
Walnut streets, swore out the warrant for
Donnelly's arrest. He claims to have paid
Donnelly $7 some time In June on a suit
of clothes and was told by Donnelly that
he was entitled to a suit. When Levison
learned that he was not longer connected
with the American Tailoring Company ho
caused a warrant to be Issued for his
arrest.
L. Fowler, an employe of the Pabst
Brewing Company, also charges that Don
nelly defrauded him of $2 In the same
manner. Only a few days ago Donnelly
organized a suit club among the employes
of tha Pabst Brewing Company and called
yesterday to receive the first payment of
$30 from the members of the club. It was
then that he was placed under arrest. Ha
was committed to the county jail to await
a hearing In Justcla WalUi' court to-morrow.
AMY LAYLEJVHJST MOVE.
Her Conduct Annoys Her Neighbors
and Ther Say She Is a, Feaco
Disturber.
Amy Layls was fined $15 In the polica
court yesttrday morning and ordered by
Judge Burnham to changa her place of
residence If she desires to escape a term
In the workhouse. Mrs. Layle lives at
Twenty-fifth and Choteau streets and tha
people who livo In that neighborhood have
objected to her presence for a long time.
'It strikes me as being rather strange
that a person cannot live where she wants
to," said the defendant to Judge Burnham.
in entering a plea ot not guilty to a
charge of disturbing the peace. "I think
I have the right to take up my aboda
wherever I please."
"Kansas City is a good place to live In."
replied Judga Burnham. as he jotted down
a tine of $ls, "but one must be careful of
his conduct. You must change your resi
dence on account of your conduct. If you
don't I'll ba compelled to change lt for
you."
Low Excursions East.
On September 1, 2 and 3 the Burlington
Route will sell round trip tickets to PHII.
ADELPHIA, $2S.S5, and NEW YORK CITY
S30.S3. For information call at S23 Main
street.
Just step In at the Junction Ticket offlcs
and get particulars of excursion to Phila
delphia, via Chicago & Alton railroad. It
will pay you, -

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