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Brownsville herald. [volume] (Brownsville, Tex.) 1910-current, March 21, 1912, Image 1

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HEAL BATON _ __ CALORIC FIRELESS COOXBU
7^ Best >* Cheapest I I^V I W^g See Our Liae *
Br’ville Hardware Co I IHVxTlI a\J+ Br’villeHatdwa e C«
> v; VOL. XIX, HO. 179. * * BROWNSVILLE. TEXAS, THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 1912. PRICE FIVE CENTS
A R R
« * ERE WHERE PROGRESS MEANS GO.
ERE IN THE RICHEST VALLEY ON EARTH.
ERE WHERE PRICES SUIT THE BUYERS.
" * ERE WHERE WE ALL WANT YOU TO COME.
A PLACE TO LIVE THAT IS UNEXCELLED.
PLACE TO DO BUSINESS UNEQUALLED.
PLACE OF OPPORTUNITIES UNSURPASSED.
4 PLACE WHERE THINGS MOVE UNPARELLED.
V
V
IO GRANDE RIVER SUPPLIES OUR WATER.
IO GRANDE RIVER HAS MADE OU R SOIL.
IO GRANDE VALLEY THE PLACE TO LIVE.
^ ■ n IO GRANDE CAPITOL THE PLACE TO COME.
f
Remember the best town in the valley.
EMEMBER WHERE WE ARE LOCATED.
EMEMBER HIDALGO, COUNTY, TEXAS.
EMEMBER FOR 30 DAYg LOTS WI LL BE CHEAP.
W. E. Cage
SALES AGLNT
FORGET YOUR TROUBLES AND COME.
FORGET YOU HAVE EVER DOUBTED. I J
KNOCK AT THE DOOR AND IT WILL OPEN.
SEEK AND YOU WILL FIND US. £
BUY WHAT WE OFFER YOU AND YOU « •
WILL ALWAYS BE GLAD

BUY A HOME AND YOUR WIFE W ILL
THINK MORE OF YOU. ' * 9
COME AND CONSULT WITH US AND YOU A
WILL ENJOY YOUR TRIP. /\
COME AND IjOOK FOR YOURSELF AND
YOU WILL BE CONVINCED. ; *
ASK FOR WHAT YOU WANT AND WE
WILL SHOW YOU WE HAVE IT.
ASK FOR THE TERMS YOU WISH AND ** 1>^
WE WILL TRY TO ACCOMODATE YOU. A
: While In the Valley ■
DON'T FAIL TO VISIT
MISSION.
» »
Elevation, 14o feet.
I * *
Irrigation, unexcelled.
Drainage, natural.
WE PROVE IT
> »
► >
To be the most progressive, high- t
ly developed, prosperous, thriv
ing proposition in the Lower Rio
Grande Valley.
A personal investigation will con
vince you of the greater advan
tages and opportunities offered.
s : MISSION LAND IMPROVEMENT COMPANY ;
S , MISSION, TEXAS
# . .
i JOHN J. CONWAY
President V Sole Own*. ,
\ __ •
ft
Rebels Send Representative.
Associated Press.
New Orleans, La., Ma<'b 20—Man
uel Lujan, the recently appointed
special envoy of the revolutionists
in Mexico, by Pascual Ororeo, leader
of the rebels, arrived here today.
“President Madero has proven
himself absolutely, incapable of ad
ministering the affairs of the gov
ernment,’* said Lujan. “The suc
cess of the present movement means
resumption of business and the
maintenance of conditions which of*
- •.i .4
. ir - * 'V
fer an opportunity for the progress
of the country along material and
intellectual lines.”
Outlaws Not Found.
Associated Press.
Hillisville, Y’a., March 20—Search
for the outlaws who shot and killed
five persons in the court house here
six days ago, has proven unavailing
up to tonight. The vigilance of the
posses is unrelaxed and the man
hunt will be prosecuted to the
death. Andrew P. Howett. a spec
tator shot in the back during the
fusilade. is expected to die and will
swell the list of victims to six.
j
GOOD ROADS PARTY
HERE NEXT MONDAY
WHEN UNCLE SAM WILL GIVE US
OBJECT LESSON
In Art of Building the Right Kind
of Roads—Valley Good Roads Ad
vocates Will Welcome Good Roads
Apostles Most Heartily.
--
It is expected that one or more
members of the famous Yoakum
Good Roads party will accompany
the Good Roads train in which B. F.
Yoakum, chairman of the Frisco
lines, has arranged to make a four
months' demonstration tour over the
Frisco Lines.
B. F. Yoakum's great interest in
Good Roads chrystalized at a meet
ing of the Farmers' Union at Shaw
nee, Oklahoma, at the Oklahoma
state fair where he said:
“There is no work more important
than to build public roads in such
a manner that they will be perman
ent and econ'omiQ&I in jnaintain
ance, otherwise the money expended
will be largely wasted.
“The question of improving our
public roads in the mo3t economical
and substantial manner is one to
w'hich I attach much importance.
Their construction for permanency
and economy in maintainance »s of
such importance that 1 extend an
invitation to the president of the
Farmers’ Union and one from each
of the states of Oklahoma, Texas,
Arakansas and Louisiana, compris
ing the south western states, to make
a trip for the study of public roads
building through the older states
that have given this question much
thought and consideration. Massa
chusetts and Connecticut are spend
ing much money in building goad
roads. New York, New Jersey, Ohio,
Pennsylvania, Indiana and Illinois
are also at work and making go j *
headway. Through a careful study
of the methods of building public
highways, .their foundation, mater
ials and systems of drainage, which
are the three important factors to
he considered, the members of this
party will acquire a knowledge on
the subject that will be helpful in
their respective states in carrying
on the work of public road improve
ments.”
It is one of this party that the
Frisco has Invited to make the tour
over the Frisco system and help in
spreading the gospel o7 Good Roads.
This Good Roads train will be in
charge of gDvernment experts on the
subject of Good Roads. The i/ower
Rio Grande Valley including
Brow'nsville, San Benito and Harlin
gen, Texas, have organized for the
betterment of the roads and will
have delegates meet the train at
Brownsville March 25. The object
of the association is to take the gov
ernment officials over a proposed
route to the Gulf in order'fo find
out at what cost a road or boule
vard from Brownsville to tne Gulf
coast could be made. At Raymond
ville and Lyford the Good Roads as
sociation of those towns will bring
up the question of a boulevard to
the bay. These roads will also lie
an outlet for {he farmers situated
•from 'the railroad to tffiring their
farm products to the nearest rail
road station at the minimum of cost
for hauling.
Enthusiasm all along the route
of the Good Roads train is at the
highest point and large crowds are
assured to attend the lectures and
exhibits. Many of 'the merchants
are using the Good Roads train h*
advertise their goods in view of the
crowds that will meet the trains a:
many of the stations. The commer
cial clubs and busines organization*
are working to get the farmers into
the townB on those days in order
that the Good Roads will Tie sh :wn
to those who know' not wfiat the
great questions means.
The Good Roads party starter,
from St. Louis and preceded by way
of Oklahoma City and Memphis
where the remaining members of t}ie
party wero picked up. The first
stop was at Washington, 7). C. The
party left the train at Washington
and took automobile'‘Tnps through
Maryland and the District of Col
umbia, where the road work was
shown the party. The. entire trip
t^ok more than three weeks and in
that time 1,500 mil.es ot roads were
inspected by automobiles and the
trip by. railroad was over 5,000
miles long. The" tour of inspection
covered New Jersey, New York,
Pennsylvania and many of the East
ern and Northeastern states. After
the return of the party the legisla
tures provided for good roads bonds
and the members of the party were
the Good Roads Apostles for the
states that are now' fighting for
good roads.
J .* -
MAY NOT ENTER
NEBRASKA RACE
CLARK ASKED T0 FAVOR WIL
SON’S CHANCE.
Nebraska Democrats Think Clark
Ought to Stay Out of Nebraska
Race in Wilson’s Interest—So
Says Senator Gore.
Associated Press.
Des Moines, la., March 20—Sena
tor Gore of Oklahoma, today author
ized the statement that Speaker
Champ Clark is to be asked to with
draw from participation in the Ne
braska presidential preference pri
mary in ft'vor of Woodrow- Wilson.
Gore sa.fl the Nebraska Progres
sive League had adopted a resolu
tion calling upon the speaker not to
allow his name to go before the
voters.
“In view of the rival candidacies
of Woodrow Wilson and Judson Har
mon. the continued candidacy of
Clark,” says the resolution, ‘‘may re
sult in the succes of Harmon, and
thus endanger the cause of true
democracy.”
OPENS CAMPAIGN
TO FULL HOUSE.
Colonel Roosevelt Begins Speech
Making in Interest of his Can
didacy—Crowds Turned Away.
Associated Press.
New York. March 20—In the
first speech of his campaign for the
presidential nomination on the re
publican ticket, Theodore Roosevelt
tonight, contrasted his position with
that taken by President Taft. The
real issue, said Roosevelt, was
whether the people should govern
themselves.
Roosevelt’s speech was delivered
here before a crowd which filled
Carnegie hall. So many persons
wished to hear him that an over
flow meeting was held In a small
er hall within the same building.
The street in front of the hall con
tained a number .f people unable to
get admittance.
CAPT. SADA UNDER $100 BOND.
Held on Charge of Violation of
Neutrality laws.
Captain Indalecio Sada, retired of
ficer of the Mexican army, charged
before U. S. Commissioner Cole with
violating the neutrality laws by at
tempting to enlist men in the army
of Mexico on United States soil,
waived examination yesterday morn
ing and was placed undpr $100 bond.
As repor'ed in Wednesday’s Her
ald, Capt. Sada was brought to
■Brownsville Tuesday evening by
Deputy United States "Marshal Do
mingo Garza from Mission. The
Mexican consul, Sllvano M. Garcia,
immediately telegraphed to General
Trevino, commander of the third
military zone of Mexico, at Monte
rey and also to the Mexican war
department and found that Captain
Sada was, as he represented himself,
a retired officer of the Mexican army,
and had been commissioned to en
list recruits for the volunteer regi
ments of Nuevo Leon.
His bond was signed yesterday
evening by Silvano M. Garcia, the
Mexican consul, and he left at once
for Matamoros.
SMALL CHANCE
TO AVERT STRIKE.
Canference Held at Cleveland Be
tween Bitiminous Mine Owners
and Miners Fails.
Associated Press.
Cleveland. Ohio. March 20-—The
wage discussions betwen the opera
tors and the representatives ot
20,000 union miners in the bitumin
ous coal fields of Western Pennsyl
vania, Ohio, Indiana and Iilinios,
aiming at averting the prolonged
suspension of business after April t,
and also to avert a possible strike
today were without results. The
conference will be resumed tomor
row.
The miners have demanded in
creased wages, shorter working
hours and recognition of the union.
Unless an agreement is reached it
is said that all biturarnous mines
will probably he shut down the
first of April until the miners and
operators agree to a new two year's
agreement.
Men are valuable just in propor
tion as they are willing to work in
harmony with other men for the
good of their city.
Impossible things ar? simply those
which so far have never been done.
‘ l,t *
GARNER SECURES
ONLY AMENDMENT
LEGISLATIVE FEAT BY ' TEXAS
CONGRESSMAN.
Amendment to Rivers and Harbors'
Bill, That Will, if Adopted by
Senate, Reopen Whole Matter of
Deep Water at Brazos Santiago.
Washington, D. 0., March 20—
A way of bringing about a reconsid
eration of the question of deep water
at Brazos Samiago was opened by
Representative John N. Garner
when he obtained the adoption of
the only amendment to the rivers
and harbors appropriation bill prior
to its passage in the House.
Mr. Garner prev ailed up in Chair
man Sparkman of the rivers and
harbors committee to propose his
amendment as a committee amend
ment providing for a survey for a
harbor off Drazos Island. The
amendment was adopted without
serious objection and was the only
amendment adopted.
The fifteenth district congressman
is very happy over this action, as
i< is practically a foregone ronclu
: sion no opposition will be voiced to
' his proprsition when the senate con
siders ihe bill.
COMMITTEE ENDORSES
STEAM RAILROAD TRACK.
Rejects Suggestion that Street Car
Company be Required to Use
Grooved Street Car Rails.
Yesterday afternoon the members
of the street and bridge committee
of the city council met in the city
hall with Mr. McClellan of the street
railway company, and C. W. Win
stedt of the Frontier Construction
company, to consult, further as to
whether or not the company should
continue laying the 80-pound rail
road rails, or whether the sugges
tion of Mr. Winsted. that a strip of
iron attached to a piece of creosoted
timber be laid just inside the rails,
thus making it practically the same
; as if the grooved rails had been
i used should be adopted.
The matter was discussed freely.
Finally, however, upon the advice
of City Engineer J. W. Davis and
Mr. McClellan it was decided to al
low the company to use the ordinary
steam railroad iron now being used.
In expressing his views, City En
gineer J. W. Davis said that he
feared that Mr. Winstedt's rail
would become loosened after a time
by the continual jar of traffic pass
ing ever it. This seemed the gen
I eral opinion of the committee and
j was the principal reason for the
: non-acceptance of the device sug
gesied by Mr. Winstedt. Another
argument that w-as advanced in
f;«vor of the present system was
that grooved rails w uld twist rub
ber tires from buggy wheels, and
also result in broken wheels. Mr.
McClellan said that ihe grooved rail
is not generally used excepting on
curves.
Alderman Crixell said that they
had the word of Mr. Hudson of the
paving company and Mr. McClellan,
i both of whom wrere engineers, that
the present system was good and
; that he for one was for allowing the
work to continue. Thp-pnflorsement
I of the present system by the com
I l.
mittee was unanimous. /
Higher Prices Coming.
——
Associated Press.
Forth Worth, Texas, March 20—
Ed C. Lasater, president, in his an
; nual address to the Cat le Raisers’
association cf Texa . today predicted
prices for cattle in Fort “Worth in
j three seasons whi< h will pay the
producer a fiar profit. The speaker
i said it cost six cents a pound to
raise a 100-pound steer, the high
est in the history of the Industry.
Prices for the finished product, -aid
the speaker, are also higher than
ever before, yet cattle raisers in
Texas complain that profits are no
what they should be.
Hero Medal for Trousdale.
| Associated Press.
San Antonio. Texas, March 20—
i The friends of Davis Trousdale, the
; Wells Fargo express messenger who
slew two bandits at Dryden, Texas,
j March 13, while they were attempt
ing to rob an express oar attached
to a Southern Pacific train, started
; a movement here today to secure for
him a Carnegie medal. The matter
is yet in embryo.

Every town in Texas needs a live
commercial club to see that neglect,
ed opportunity does not stall
through its streets.
T. .> 4 ’ . \
_—. v , t '
AWFUL EXPLOSION
WRECKS MINE
ELEVEN ALIVE OUT OF ONE
HUNDRED AND SIXTEEN.
Mine Explosion at McCurtain, Okla
homa, worst in History of South
west—Tons of Wreckage Piled in
Path of Rescuers—Few Recovered
Associated Press.
Fort Smith, Ark., March 1*0—Out
of a total of one hundred and sixteen
men who entered mine number two
of the Sans Bois Coal company at
McCurtain, Oklahoma, thirty miles
west of here, at 7 o'clock this morn
ing, only eleven are known to be
alive at ten o’clock tonight.
All hope has been given up for
the others.
A gas explosion at 9 o'clock this
rrtorning wrecked the mine and piled
tons of wreckage In the path t i
half a hundred rescuers, who are
now at work searching the entries
for the entombed men.
The explosion and its results are
, worst in the history of the south
west and five thousand people at
the little mining camp, which
nestles among the Sans Bois moun
tains are so dazed they can hardly
realize the extent of the disaster.
Four bodies have been brought
out of the underground tomb, but
they arc so blackened they can not
be recognized. Sixteen others have
been located and will be taken out
bef re morning.
Meanwhile in agony of fear hun
dreds of women and children crowd
about the mouth of the slope, hop
ing against hope that husbands and
fathers may be brought forth alive.
Air is being pumped into the mine
in the faint hope that seme of the
men may have reached a place of
safety and rescuers arc working
frantically to get to them or dig
out their dead bodies.
Neither the rescuers nor the man
agement of the mine entertain any
hope that any of the miners are
alive. Nine of those saved were
working in an isolated part of the
mine and escaped by climbing a lad
der. The tenth man was blown into
a side entry and the last was in the
slope. Both are seriously Injured.
DAKOTA VOTERS
IGNORE TAFT
SENATOR DIXON CALLS THE RE
SULT HUMILIATING.
Roosevelt's Manager Say* Only One
Voter in Forty Desired President*
Renomination — Most Crushing
Defeat in Our History.
Associated Press.
Washington. D. C., March 2#—
Senator Dixon, manager of the
Roosevelt campaign, today said:
"li\- the primary election yes er
day in North Dakota but on* re
publican voter in f»rty expressed
a wish that President Taft be made
the republican nominee for presi
dent. No such humiliating crushing
defeat of a presidential candidate
asking tfor renomlnatton has ever
, been witnessed in American pollth »
I "Feur y^srs ap^ In North “a
kota Tv ft received 57,680 vo**v
Yesterday less than 2.000 voted f r
him.'*
THE LADIES BEG THAT
TREES MAY BE SPARED
The ladies of Brownsville are
j greatly concerned at the prospe* ta
i »f losing the beautiful shade tree:
that have been doomed on account
of the street paving, and a move hat
been undertaken by them to save
| the trees, if possible. At the Self
j Culture culb meeting yesterday at -
ernoon. the members decided to ad
dress a petition to the city council,
begging that the shade trees, which
have been nutured so carefully all
these years be spared whenever p
sible. The petition is being clr
culaied for skpiaturcs and has al
ready secured a number of signers.
The ladies have been planuing to
assist in beautifying the clfy. and
are exceedingly sorry to see the
trees which have added so greatlr
to the attractions of our little citv
ruthlessly sacrificed, jusi because
they hapiMMi to stand a few iurhe#
outside the bounds of the sidewalks.
Conference Called Off.
Associated Press.
Washington, D. C., March
The Conference between President
Taft and John Mitchell In relation
to the threatened coal strike is In.
definitely postponed, according to an
announcement made late today. It
is said the administration regards
the present as an inopportune time
to take a hand in the affair.
****** ******* *********** ***** *
*
* *
* The weather changes, and the cost ♦
* of living, like tariff revision is +
* upward, but the price of ICE re- *
j* mains the same. t
| Peoples Ice G >. !
* BROWNSVILLE, TEXAS *
* *
* * ***** ************************
LAND BARGAIN No. ONE
We ARE READY to SELL Y’OU the BEST of the IRRIGATED LAND
at PRIDES that will make you 10 0 per cent PROFIT within SIX
MONTHS. STRONG STATEMENT but here is SNAP NO. I.
About 30 A' RES of the very best land, l^lf mile of loading twitch
near railroad. Timber will nearly pay f>r clearing; drainage perfect, on
canal. $700 incumbrance past due.
PR!< ED at $60 per acre. ONE HAIjS* DASH, balance one and t•»
years 3t 7 per cent. This land i3 worth $125 per acre, and compared
with up the branch land. $200 per acre.
MUST sell this week; you muat buy this week if you get it a' that
| price. Only ONE CHANCE.
We have other similar BARGAINS.
Rio Grande Realty and Investment
Company.
BROWNSVILLE, TEXAi
VALLEY LAND FOR SALE OR EXCHANGE FOR OTHER PROPERTY
UNo. 219. BROWNSVILLE . 160 acre farm all In cultivation
and irrigation. Within 3- 4 mile of Ry. and switch. The roll is
a dark loam and well adapted to truck, cotton, corn, atigar cane
etc. Owing to location, is well adapted to being cut Into Itttl»
! $90 per acre. 1-3 c*3h, bal. 1, 2 yrt. truck farms 5 to 10 acres. Price
i f
I
i uAl.LAM COLONIZATION COMPANY, Brownsville, Tex.
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