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Brownsville herald. [volume] (Brownsville, Tex.) 1910-current, March 22, 1912, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063730/1912-03-22/ed-1/seq-1/

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X C0MMDN1T* SILVER "1 , ' . m. W HOT POINT IRONS
Guaranteed 50 Years Z ^B R B Best on Earth. j
Br’ville Hardware Co JL J* J—i A VxjL JL-lJL^a Br’villeHardwa e Co
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YOL. XIX. NO. 180. BROWNSVILLE. TEXAS, FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 1912. PRICE FIVE CENTS.
,p :: a r r
!• * ERE WHERE PROGRESS MEANS GO.
ERE IN THE RICHEST VALLEY ON EARTH.
ERE WHERE PRICES SUIT THE BUYERS.
" P ERE WHERE WE ALL WANT YOU TO COME.
A PLACE TO LIVE THAT IS UNEXCELLED.
/\ PLACE TO DO BUSINESS UNEQUALLED.
PLACE OF OPPORTUNITIES UNSURPASSED.
^ 4 PLACE WHERE THINGS MOVE UNPARELLED.
I
I
lO GRANDE RIVER SUPPLIES OUR WATER.
II lO GRANDE RIVER HAS MADE OU R SOIL.
F^L lO GRANDE VALLEY THE PLACE TO LIVE.
“ ^ 10 GRANDE CAPITOL THE PLACE TO COME.
Remember the best town in the valley.
EMEMBER WHERE WE ARE LOCATED.
EMEMBER HIDALGO, COUNTY, TEXAS.
EMEMBER FOR 30 DAYS LOTS WILL BE CHEAP.
W. E, Cage
SALES AGLNT
FORGET YOUR TROUBLES AND COME. {.
FORGET YOU HAVE EVER DOUBTED. •*' I J
KNOCK AT THE IKX)R AND IT WILL OPEN.
SEEK AND YOU WILL FIND US. £ “
BUY WHAT WE OFFER YOU AND YOU •
WILL ALWAYS BE GLAD.
BUY A HOME AND YOUR WIFE W ILL
THINK MORE OF YOU. - *

'
COME AND CONSULT WITH US AND YOU A
WILL ENJOY YOUR TRIP. /\
COME AND LOOK FOR YOURSELF AND
YOU WILL BE CONVINCED. j "
ASK FOR WHAT YOU WANT AND WE '
WILL SHOW YOU WE HAVE IT. .<■ ' 1 |
ASK FOR THE TERMS YOU WISH AND i^k
WE WILL TRY TO ACCOMODATE YOU. JL
P A R R
r While In the Valley i
DON’T FAIL TO VISIT
MISSION.
> >
Elevation, 14o feet.
’ ’ j
Irrigation, unexcelled.
Drainage, natural.
WE PROVE IT
i i
To be the most progressive, high
ly developed, prosperous, thriv
*
ing proposition in the Lower Rio
Grande Valley.
A personal investigation will con
vince you of the greater advan
tages and opportunities offered.
: MISSION LAND IMPROVEMENT COMPANY :
MISSION, TEXAS !
JOHN J. CONWAY
Prcaident V Sole Owm,
I (
,
Minimum Wage Bill.
Associated Press.
London. Rng., March 21—The
House of Commons tonight* passed
to the second reading the minimum
wage bill, which is designed to set
tle the strike of the miners. The
liberals and nationalists voted with
the government.
Texas is beginning to realize that
the public schools can not be prop
erly maintained and developed
without local taxation. As evidence
of this, local taxation for mainten
ance alone, increased $1,.i00,00f)
last year.
*’.'' r *• 4
Cattle Market
Associated Press.
Kansas City, March 21—Cattle
steady to ten cents higher; export
steers, $.7.2.7 to $8.00. Hogs, 2.7 to
3.7 cents higher; heavies $7.4.7 to
$7.60. Sheep strong to 10 cents
higher.
1
Useful Irritation.
First Housewife—l hope you
never nag your husband.
Second Housewife—Only when
he’ beating 'the rugs. When thor
oughly irritated he makes a much
better job of it.—(Pathfinder
. 11
SUGAR GROWERS
X TO TAX THEMSELVES
TO AID IN SUPPORT OF SUGAR
EXPERIMENT STATION.
Decided at Meeeting of Association.
Urge Appointment of E. C. Green
as Director of Proposed Station.
Next Meeting at Harlingen.
At the meeting of the Rio Grande
Cane Growers’ Association held yes
terday at San 'Benito, it was decided
that members shall be assessed for
the next grinding seasons as fol
lows: The grower to pay 5c per ton
on all cane sent to the mills, and
the manufacturer to pay 25c per
ton on all sugar manufactured, the
fund thereby created to be used in
addition to the government appro
priation for the support of the pro
posed sugar experiment station for
the Rio Grande Valley.
Also the following resolution was
unanimously adopted:
“Whereas, it was considered that
with a government appropriation of
$ 15,000, with further expected as
sistance from the state of Texas;
and, in addition, a tonnage assess
ment on all cane and sugar produced
by members of this association, that
an annual fund would be created
sufficient for the establishment of an
efficient sugar experiment station
for the Lower Rio Grande Valley,
and,
“Whereas, our representative in
congress, Hon. John N. Garner, lias
advised the association that Senator
Culberson will introduce an amend
ment to the Agricultural Appropria
tion Bill in the Sejiate, asking for
an appropriation for the esablish
ment of a sugar experiment station
in the Lower Rio Grande Valley, and
that an appropriation of $5,000 is
- . -
inadequate for the contemplated
wrork,'for the reason that the De
partment of Agriculture has no
sugar cane expert in its employ,
anVI‘ properly equip such a station
vvU’h'h'iihrmahent staff an experienc
ed dYi/L VHrn potent expert would have
to lie Secured from the outside to fill
the position of director, and that a
satisfactory man could not be se
cured for the full amount of the re
duced appropriation, and conse
quently this position must now be
filled by a departmental man other
than a cane expert, and,
“Whereas, Professor E. C. Green
has been in charge of the South Tex
as Garden for the past five years,
and has already had considerable ex
perience with the growing of sugar
cane in this Valley, has always been
in close touch with the pane fields
of our farmers and is familiar with
the troubles of our cane growers,
and furthermore has a thorough
knowledge of our soil conditions and
their proper treatment, and,
“Whereas, as this association has
already voted to assess the cane and
sugar tonnage of its members to as
sist in the support of a sugar exper
iment station, it respectfully urges
that its wishes are entitled to re
ceive consideration upon points that
are vital to its members, therefore,
Be it Rpsolved, that for reasons
of efficiency, on account of his past
experience in the Valley and hts
knowledge of its sugar-cane already
acquired, which gives him an ad
vantage of one to two years study
over a man new to the situation,
Pr fessor E. C. Green is the man
best fitted of ail of the present Ag
ricultural Department siaff, for the
position of director of the proposed
sugar experiment station, and,
Be it Further Resolved, that the
secretary be instructed to ask our
senators and representatives to
transmit to the secretary of agricul
ture, or the proper officer of the de
partment, the desire of our. cane
growers, practically all of whom are
represented in this association, to
have Professor Green assigned to
this work, in order that they may
obtain the services of the man they
deem most valuable to them in the
present emergency.”
On invitation of Fred A. Schnff,
the next meeting of the association
will be held at Harlingen.
After luncheon, the visiting mem
bers of the association were shown
over the new San Benito sugar mill,
and made an automobile trip of in
spection to a number of the local
sugar-cane plantations.
.
! UNIQUE TRAIN TO START
FROM BROWNSVILLE.
Carrying Minature Models of All
Types of Road Construction and
Road Machinery.
_ I
|
The following interesting descrip
tion of the Frisco Good Roads
Special which will start from
Brownsville next week was received
_ |
from the office of Public Roads at
Washington:
On March 25, 1912, a unique train
will depart from Brownsville, Texas,
for a four months trip over the
Frisco system. This will be the
Good Roads Special to be operated
by the Frisco Railway company, the
Office of Public Roads, of the U. S.
department of agriculture, and the
American Association for High way
Improvement. It will be a train of
four cars, specially equipped, and
will carry lecturers and an unusual
exhibit. This exhibt consists of
carefully prepared models of all
types of road construction from
sand-clav and gravel to bituminous
macadam, and of reinforced con
crete bridges and culverts, com
pleted and under const ruction.
It also contains minature models'
f road machinery and a rock quarry
which are operated by electricity.
Each model in the car is properly
labeled so that the object-lesson hi
itself affords a considerable road
education. The equipment of this
train even surpasses tha, of the four
similar Good R ’ads trains recently
operated over other railway systems
in the United Spates.
This train will cover aboutJ 15,000
miles in the states of Texas, Louis- I
iaua, Missouria, Kansas, Arkansas, j
Oklahoma, Mississippi and Alabama, j
A complete schedule of stops has j
been prepared which provides op
portunity for more than three hun
dred lectures upon good roads topics.
Those lectures will be given upon
those road subjects which are mos:
intimately connected with the lo
cality visited.
H. Wells, superintendent of
road construction, assisted by J. W.1
• I
Janssen, bo.h of the U. S. Office of
Public Roads, will accompany the
train o give good roads lectures.
Their addresses will be Illustrated,
hoover 100 colored lantern slides.
The representative of the American
Association for Highway Improve-j
men! will effect good roads organi- {
zations where there is a desire to;
have them. These men are expert1
highway engineers and are perpared j
and willing .o answer all questions]
which time permits at each stop. j
Meetings at Brownsville.
The Good Roads train is scheduled
io be at Brownsville Monday andj
Tuesday March 25 and 26. Demon
strations and lectures will he given
on Monday at 9 a. m., 2 p. na., and
8 p., and on Tuesday at 9 a. m. The
train will leave Brownsville later
on Tuesday for San Benito.
Should the audience prove greater
than can be accommodated in the
lecture car, provisions will be made
to deliver Die lectures at some hall.
TO SUPRESS
FALSE REPORTS.
American Colony in Mexico City
Offers to Assist Government in
Suppression of Unfounded Rumors
Associated Press.
Mexico City, March 21 The
council administration of the so
ciety of the AmeUicar^ -colony to
day prepared a resolution for pre
sentation to Minister Calero at the
foreign office, offering the assistance
of that organization in prosecuting
the authors of untruthful reports of |
conditions in the capital.
Orders have been issued from the j
department tha; communications toi
newspapeer correspondents in Puebla
that no news dispatches giving thei
number or location of the federal
troops can be transmitted.
Great Turkish Victory.
Associated Press.
London. Ene., March 21—A Con- j
stantinoplc dispatch to the Ex
change Telegram company -ays that;
the Turkish minister has an- '
nounced a great Turkish victory at i
Benghazi in Tripoli. The Italian
casualties are given at 400 killed
and wounded.
Wool Tariff Before House.
Associated Press.
Washington, D. C., March 21 —
The democratic wool tariff revision
bill, levying twenty per cen. ad va
lorem duty on raw wool, was intro
duced by democratic leader Under
wood, and will be reported to the
House tomorrow to avoid a caucus
and thereby dodge trouble with the
advocates of free wool.
GREAT LEGAL EIGHT
ALMOST ENDED
LONGEST TRIAL IN HISTORY OF
COURT.
The Trial of Ten Chicago Packers
Accused of Conspiracy in Re
straint of Trade, Has lasted Since
December 6th.—Verdict Soon.
Associated Press.
Chicago. III., March 21—The trial
of the ien Chicago pakers on a
charge of conspiracy in maintaining
a combination in restraint of trade
in violation of the criminal pro
visions of the Sherman am'ti-trust
law which began December 6. is the
closing chapter of a long legal bat
tle waged by ihe government against
the big packers.
The heads of the packing compan
ies in the proceedings are named as
individual defendants and a verdict
of guilty under the law would make
them liable to either a fine of $5,000
each, or imprisonment for one year
or both penalties.
The ten defendants are:
J. Ogden Armour, president Arm
our and company.
Arthur Meeker, director and gen
eral manager Armour and company.
Thomas J. Connors, director and
general supei intendent Armour and
company.
IiOui“ F. Swift, president Swift
and company.
Edward F. Swift, vice president
Swift and company.
Charles H. Swift, director Swift
and company.
Francis A. Fowler, manager beef
department Swift and company.
Edward Morris, president Morris
and company.
Louis II. Heynian, manager beef
department Morris and company.
Edward Tilden, prosideut Nation
al Packing company.
The government contends:
That prior to 1902 prices were
fixed, shipments regulated and ter
ritory dividocj by the old, pool
which met every Tuesday afternoon.
That after the old beef pool dis
solved in 1902 the packers held sec
ret meetings at each others’ home?..
That the National Packing tym
pany since its organization,, ,,1,9^
has been used. ?|3 tl^.,n!‘,pje^r^g,
house" for the allege}! combinflLjprv
That the packers adopted a test
cost and margin system which was
used in the purchase of cattle and
the sale of fresh meat.
That the allowances made for by
products in figuring the test cost
wore inadequate and the “cost"
used by the packers was fictitious
and higher than the actual cost.
That the representatives of the
different companies in New York,
Boston and other eastern cities ex
changed information in regard to
prices and shipments and tele
graphed the figures to their super
ior- in Chicago.
That the violation of the Sherman
law by the packers has been contin
uous and practically uninterrupted
since 1 S 9 S.
It is estimated that the trial cost
the packers $500,000 and the gov
ernment about $100,000.
The case will go to the jury today.
STATEMENT TO VIDICATE
LOCAL FEDERAL OFFICIALS
In order to vindicate ,tbe local
federal officials charged with “per
»
niciotis" activity in local politics,
Alderman W. S. Blackshear Wednes
day afternoon visited earh of the
city alderman and other city of
ficials, with 'he exception of Aider
man Cobolinin and Mayor Kowalski,
with a statement to the effect tha
there was noting pernicious in th*1
activity of said federal officials.
Mr. (Blackshear said that, every
official without exception signed .he
paper.
As a reason for not. requesting
Messrs, f'obolini and Kowalski to
sign the statement. Mr. Blackshear
said that Mr. Cobolini was a cafidi
date, and that Mr. Kowalski signed
the telegram making the charges
against the federal officials. The
paper will be sent to Washington.
COMPENSATION FOR
RURAL ROUTE CARRIERS
Associated Press.
Washington, D. C., March'21 —
Postmaster General HPchcock today
urged that congress extend to the
rural letter carriers, who may be in
jured in line of duty, the same priv
ileges and compensation as now
provided for injured railway mail
clerks.
,
TWENTY SIX MINERS
SAVED FROM MINE
THIRTY FIVE MISSING—FIFTY
FIVE DEAD.
Gallant Struggle for Life of Fifteen
Men Entombed in Oklahoma Mine.
All But Two Able to Walk When
Rescued.
Associated Press.
Fort Smith, Ark., March 21 —
Fifty-five bodies recovered, twenty
six men rescued alive, and thirty
five missing, was the record early
lonlght in the mining, camp at Mc
Curtain, Oklahoma, where the ga*
explosion early yesterday entombed
116 miners. Fifteen men were
found this morning huddled around
the air pump in a room at the side
of the entry down which the pois
onous gases swept after the explos
ion. They had built a curtain at .lie
entrance of the room to exclude he
foul air, and were kept alive by idl
ing themselves tier upon tier with
their faces to Hip life giving oxygen
pumped down from above ground.
Meanwhile they kept up a con
stant tapping on 'the air pipe and
finally the noise attracted the atten
tion of the rescuers, who located
them and brought them to the top. j
All but two were able to walk* out,
guided by the lights th«*ir rescuers
held.
Search is being prosecuted for
others who are missing.
All Accounted For.
Associated Press.
Port Smith, Ark., March 21- At
midnight all except ten of the men
entombed when the Sans Hois mine
at McCurtain, Oklahoma, was
wrecked by an explosion, have been
accounted for. Twenty-six nave
been rescued alive, others were
brought to the surface dead or their
bodies located in the mine.
Ralph Kenny, son of a local min
ister was among the fifteen men
found alive in the mine today.
Young Kenny died, however, short
ly after being brought out of the
mine. W. D. Roper, civil engineer,
was among those whose bodies were
found tonight.'
4 --."
J ’** Cotton Market
Associated Press.
New Orleans, La., March 21 -Cot
ton futures closed steady with a net
decline of to 8 points. Spots
steady and unchanged.
MINERS' DEMANDS
VOTED DOWN
REFUSED WAGE INCREASE AND
SHORTER HOURS.
Situation as to Bituminous Fields
Considered Serious — There is
Hope in Sub-Committee Which
Meets Today.

Associated Press.
Cleveland, Ohio. March 21—All
demands of the two hundred thouw
and bituminous coal miners in tb*»
fields of Western Pennsylvania.
Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois for a ten
per cent increase in pay and shorter
working hours were voted down by
the operators late today.
As a final effort to prevent a pro
longed shut down of the mines after
April 1, when the present wage
agreement terminates and possibly
prevent a strike, the whole dispute
was referred to a sub-committee
which will convene tomorrow.
’Both operators and miners de
< ivire the coal situation throughout
the country Is grave. Besides the
two hundred thousand miners in the
four fields directly concerned, a
hundred and fifty thousand bitum
inous coal miners in other states
are dependent upon these delibera
tions for a bahts of making their
wage scale.
in addition the committee will
consider the wage demands of a
hundred and seventy thousand an
thracite miners. *
It is pointed out by President
White that wages of more than five
hundred thousand miners after April
1, were in dispute.
REBELS ADVANCE
TOWARD TORREON
Rebels Float Loan of 1.200,000
Pesos—Bonds Taken by Minero
Bank in Chihuahua.
Chihuahua, Mex., March 21 Ac
cording to changed plans, Ceneral
Antonio R°jas will not ho sent
: against Ojinaga hut will join (ien
'
eral Salazar's column now nroeoedf
ing slowly toward the federal forces
at Torreon. Te rebels took the
towns of Rosario and Santa Barbara
today. ' ~
The Minero Bank of* Chihuahua^
! of which .luan Creel/ brother ofm
Enrique Creel, is president, will*
take moat of the* MPO.niiA peso® .
bonds issued by tho new revolution-•
ary administration in the state of
Chihuahua. It may lie determined
to issue 100,000 pesos in Internal
revenue stamps.
************** *4*4* * + + 44- 4444* *
* ♦
/i*
* The weather changes, and the cost ♦
J of living, like tariff revision is *
% upward, but the price of ICE re- i
* mains the same.
*
I Peoples Ice C ». !
* 1
* BROWNSVILLE, TEXAS *
* ♦
*
* * * * * * **•********#**. + *****.*!*♦■►♦
LAND BARGAIN No. ONE
We ARE READY to SEEL YOU the BEST of the IRRIGATED LAND
at PRICES that will make yol. 100 per cent PROFIT within SIX
MONTHS. STRONG STATEMENT but here is SNAP NO. I
About 30 ACRES of the very best land, half mile of loading switch
near railroad.' Timber will nearly pay for clearing; drainage perfect, on
canal. $700 incumbrance past due.
PRICED at $60 per aero. ONE HALF CASH, balance one and |w<>
years at 7 per cent. This land Is worth 1125 per acre, and coapai • ?
with up the branch land. $200 per acre.
MUST sell this week; you must buy this week if you get It at that
price. Only ONE CHANCE.
We have* other similar BARGAINS
Rio Grande Realty and Investment
Company.
BROWNSVILLE, ' TEXAS
VALLEY LAND FOR SALE OR EXCHANGE FOR OTHER PROPERTY
□ No. 219. BROWNSVILLE. 160 acre farm all in cultivation
and irrigation. Within 3-4 mile of Ry. and s-witch. The noil Is
a dark loam and well adapted to truck, cotton, corn, sugar cane
etc. Owing to location, is well adapted to being cut Into Ilttli
$90 per acre. 1-3 cash, bal. 1, 2 yrs.truck farms i' 5 to 10 acres. Price
HAI.LAM COLONIZATION COMPANY. Brownsville. Tex.
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