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Brownsville herald. [volume] (Brownsville, Tex.) 1910-current, March 23, 1912, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of North Texas; Denton, TX

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063730/1912-03-23/ed-1/seq-1/

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—— RROWISNVII I F HFRAI Fj ■*—*
Br’villc Hardware Co w w A lk# w JL • Br ville Hardware Co
PHARR
« * ERE WHERE PROGRESS MEANS GO.
ERE IN THE RICHEST VALLEY ON EARTH.
ERE WHERE PRICES SUIT THE BUYERS.
* * ERE WHERE WE ALL WANT YOU TO GOME.
A PLACE TO LIVE THAT IS UNEXCELLED.
PLACE TO DO BUSINESS UNEQUALLED.
PLACE OF OPPORTUNITIES UNSURPASSED.
, ~ PLACE WHERE THINGS MOVE UNPARELLED.
RIO GRANDE RIVER SUPPLIES OUR WATER.
IO GRANDE RIVER HAS MAJIE OU R SOIL.
IO GRANDE VALLEY THE PLACE TO LIVE.
IO GRANDE CAPITOL THE PLACE TO COME.
Remember the best town in the valley.
EMEMBER WHERE WE ARE LOCATED.
EMEMBER HIDALGO, COUNTY, TEXAS.
EM EMBER FOR GO DAYS LOTS W|LL BE CHEAP.
- 5
W. E. Cage
SALES AG! NT
l;‘*l * \,
, illHf ;
FORGET YOUR TROUBLES AND COME.
FORGET YOU HAVE EVER DOUBTED. I B
KNOCK AT THE DOOR AND IT WILL OPEN.
SEEK AND YOU WILL FIND US. “
BUY WHAT WE OFFER YOU AND YOU -
WILL ALWAYS BE GLAD.
BUY A HOME AND YOUR WIFE WILL
THINK MORE OF YOU. * *
COME AND CONSULT WITH US AND YOU A
WILL ENJOY YOUR TRIP. /%
COME AND LOOK FOR YOURSELF AND / \
YOU WILL BE CONVINCED. >
i4.
ASK FOR WHAT YOU WANT AND WE J1P%
WILL SHOW YOU WE HAVE IT. IB
ASK FOR THE TERMS YOU WISH AND
WE WILL TRY TO ACCOMODATE YOU. <■*
■ While In the Valley :
■ :
DON’T FAIL TO VISIT
MISSION.
i
( >
Elevation, 14o feet.
> * I
Irrigation, unexcelled.
Drainage, natural.
WE PROVE IT
e . ;
To be the most progressive, high
ly develooed, prosperous, thriv
ing proposition in the Lower Rio
Grande Valley.
A personal investigation will con
vince you of the greater advan
tages and opportunities offered.
V : MISSION UND IMPROVEMENT COMPANY j!
MISSION, TEXAS
I JOHN J. CONWAY 1
k
President ftf Sole Own*. (
S BURIED
)DAY IN ARLINGTON
r) nd Chaplain of Wrecked
1 rCjl Make Speeches—All
ereraonies Will be
/
ated Press.
\ .hington, D. C., March 22—
| >dies of the heroes recovered
he wrecked battleship Maine
* laid .o rest in the Arlington
ry tomorrow. President Taft
lather Chadwick, who was
.iiu cf the Maine at the time
‘he explosion, will deliver ad
i j >es. Immediately at the eonclu
“ 1

sion of the ceremonies the army
battery stationed at the Washing
ton monument will begin firing
twenty one-minute guns.
Miners Refuse Proposition.
Associated Press.
Cleveland. Ohio, March 22—Fol
lowing the meeting of the sub-com
mittee considering the differences
between the bituminous coal miners
and operators this afternoon, it was
announced that the minrs had re
jected the proposition of the opera
tors to continue the present wage
agreement. Previously th^ operators
held out for a ten per c t decrease.
■ DECLARES
nvaoEssM.
CLOSER RELATIONS WITH LATIN
COUNTRIES ESTABLISHED.
Message Gives no Particulars as to
Things Accomplished — Received
at La Guaira. Venezuela, With
Military Honors—On to Caracas.
Associated Press.
Washington, D. C., March 22—
Secretary of State Knox cabled the
sta.e department today that the ob
ject of his visit, which was to lay
the foundation for closer relations
between this country and Latin
America had been attained. .His
message gave no details as to what
had been accomplished. t
A message from La Guaira, re
ceived at the department today, says
that the secretary was received at
the quay there with military honors.
After some brief formalities, Mr.
Knox and his party proceed to t'ar
acas.
PROF. THOMAS P. BARBOUR.
Prominent Educator Dies After Long
and Useful Career.
Professor Thomas P. Barbour,
who was for years prominent as
superintendent of the public schools
of Brownsville, died at his home in
this city Friday, March 22, at !:30
o’clock. His death terminated a
long and painful illness, resulting
from enlargement of the heart.
Prof. Barbour was a native of La
Grange, Ala., born July 24. 1$;>7.
His college education was received
in Danville, K>\, where he graduated
from the famous old Centre college
in 18.7.7. His classmates included
Senator Breckenridge and a number
of others who afterwards became
prominent in the counsels of iheir
state.
Early in his career. Prof. Barbour
'.ook up his life work of teaching.
Shortly after his graduation, when
he was not over nineteen years of
age, he went to Missouri, where lie!
engaged in teaching in Westminister
College. Later he became president
of the Lindenwood Female College
at St. Charles, Mo. He closed this
school in order to join the Confeder
ate army during the civil war.
Prof. Barbour was maried in 18fir>
at Louisville, Ky., to Miss Jane
Rogers Gamble, who has been the
faithful and loving partner of his
life ever since. Only two years ago
the couple celebrated their golden
wedding. Theirs was a happy
union indeed, and seld m has man
and wife seemed more truly ma ed.
One son, Phillip Barbour, and two
daughters. Misses Mary and Eliza
#
both Barbour, all residing in
Brownsville, survive to comfort
their devo.ed mother in the great
sorrow that has befallen her.
Professor Barbour came to Texas
wvith his family in 1877, .-till follow
ing his profession of teaching He
came to Brownsville in 1897, and
in 1898 was appointed superintend
ent of the public schools, which po
sition he held for twelve years. He
was a man of high education and
possessed a wide fund of learning,
his learning and his character as a
Christian gentleman esporia'ly ffr
ting him as a neducator. Through•
out his entire residence hare, he has
held the confidence and respect of
all who knew him.
His life has been an open book,
every act that of an honorable,
sincere and conscientious man. In
all relations, his life has been
worthy and admirable, and, though
he has l>pen called lienee, his ex
ample will still live in the hearts
of .hose who have known and loved
him.
The funeral took place yesterday
at 7 p. m., with services at the
Presbyterian church. The interment
was conducted by the Masonic lodge
of which he was an honored mem
ber. The pall bearers were:
Honorary—Dr. S. H. Bell, J. 'B.
Sharpe, S. K. Hallam, M. J. Garcia,
J. J. Gocke, Louis Kowalski.
Active—Geo. M. Putegnat. W. G.
Willmann. A. W. Wood, E. A. Mc
Gary, S. Bell, J. T. Bollack.
Will Investigate Coal Dealers.
Associated Press.
Washington, D. C., March 22—
It was learned here today that the
department of justice contemplates
the investigation of the associations
of coal dealers in the Northwest,
which, it is charged, have combined
to maintain a h^h price of coal In
violivtion yUie.fShermah anti-trust
lav.
DRAINAGE FIGTH
VERY INTERESTING CASE BE
FORE COMMISSIONERS.
People of Rio Hondo District Op
pose Drainage Scheme on Ground
that Eleven Hundred Acres Land
Involved Will Not be Benefited.
The county court room is at pres
ent the scene of % very interesting
legal contest in which Messrs. Spears
and Morrison of San Benito, and
Judge W. E. Hawkins of Browns
ville, and Marion B. Jennings of Rb
Hondo, are the contestants, and the
county commissioners are the
judges.
The petition for the formluion of
San Benito Cameron County Drain
age District No. Three is up for re
hearing. .The entire afternoon of
yesterday was devoted to arguments
for and against the formation of
the district, with Judge Spears
speaking for the affirmative and
Messrs. Hawkins and Jennings ror
the negative.
The opponents of the mea-ure.
who come from the Rio Hondo dis
trict, claim that 1,1 JO acres of land
bordering on the Arroyo Colorado,
belonging to them, will be in no
wise benefited by the proposed 1
drainage district, as their land is
so situated that k drains naturally
into the arroyo. The opponents
further claim that they were not
aware of the propostion to form a
distirct including their territory.
On the other hand, the advocates
of the district claiij) that the
notices of the formation of the dis
trict were ported in accordance with
the law, and that it was not the
fault of the distirct if those living
in the Rio Hondo neighborhood had
not seen the notices
Judge Spears admitted that the
Rio Hondo people did not need the
drainage, but contended that allow
ing them to wi(|idraw would no;
only delay the. «i#rk of getting the
matter before *he court, and having
the bond issu election authorized,
if the court saw fit. but, if Rio
Hondo were allowed to withdraw,
so the petitioners claim, any other
portion of the distirc. may do like
wise.
NO VIOLATION OF
EIGHT-HOUR LABOR LAW.
%
Commissioner of Labor Might Have
Been Saved Unnecessary Trouble.
If Informer Had Investigated.
The people of Brownsville may be
thankful that the paving contract of
the city with the Creosoted Wood
Block Paving company was made
during the month of August instead
of after November 1, 1911, as in
formation was received here yester
day from the Labor Commissioner of
the State of Texas, to the effect .hat
any municipal work which may
have been contracted since Novem
ber 1, would have to ho contsructed
in compliance with a law which
provides for only eight hours work
par day.
A letter received from the state
commissioner of labor by Mayor
Kowalski, .-.ated that the commis
sioner had been informed that some
street paving was being done in
Brownsville in violation of the
eight-hour law, “unless the contrac
tor can show that the contract was
made prior to November 1, 1911.’’
The mayor showed the letter to Mr.
Hudson, superintendent for the pav
ing company yesterday morning, and
was informed by the latter of the
date of the contract. Mr. Hudson
stated that it was very kind of .-ome
interested or disinterested party to
advise the state labor commissioner
of the possibilities of his company
violating the laws of the s.ate of
Texas, but that the party might
have saved himself the trouble by
coming to the company, if he
thought the law wa» being violated.
“The Creosoted Wood Block Pav
ing company is from New Orleans
and not familar with the different
Texas laws" Mr. Hudson said, ‘‘and
might have unknowingly violated
some law of this kind, but it would
inform the state authorities..”
However, even if the men are
working ten hours, there is no vio
lation of the law, as the contract
was made before the eight-hour law
went into effect. Mr. Hudson pointed
out further the fact that if an
eight-hour instead of 4 t*n hour day
were ennforced. it would merely
mean that, in figuring on the con
tract. the city would .have had the
difference in time to oay for.
1_
MCGREGOR METHODS
ANGER ROOSEVELT
| *1
-—— _
CHARGES TAFT LEADERS WITH
OPPRESSIVE MTHODS.
Dixon Says McGregor's Political Ad
vertisements in Texas Newspapers
Are for Purpose of Forcing Repub
licans to Send Taft Delegation.
Associated Press.
Washington. D. C., March 22—
The Roosevelt headquarters tonight
gave out a statement with reference
to political advertisements appear
ing in Texas papers attributed to
H. F. McGregor, the Taft manager
in that state.
“The advertisement takes its
place in history beside the notorious
Norton letter wherein the secretary
to ihe president admitted his use of
federal patronage to force congress
to pass the kind of legislation Taft
desired,” said Senator Dixon, Roose
velt’s campaign manager. Contin
uing Mr. Dixon said, “the procedure
was a gross violation of the spirit
of the bribery statute and certainly
was intimidation.’’
Rooseveh’s managers charge the
Taft forces with using the patronage
club in Texas to coerce the republi
cans of that state in.o selecting a
Taft delegation to the Chicago con
vention. and are using advertise
ments in Texas papers to that end.
MISSION WILL HAVE
NEW RAILROAD
ONION CROP BRINGS $325 PER
ACRE.
Average of Three Cars of Cabbage
Per Day—Total of 125 Cars This
Year—Yield Ten to Fourteen
Tons Per Acre.
Special to The Herald.
Mission. Texas, March 22—The
following letter, dated Hous
ton. Texas, March 21, was received
today by William Ferguson, of the
Star Land company, at Mission
frtm Sam A. Robertson regarding
the railroad in processs of construc
tion:
“Answering your inquiry as to
the progress we are making on the
railroad from Mission to Monte
Cristo, beg to advise you that we
have purchased about one thousand
tons of rails which are being loaded
at Galena, Arkansas, on the St.
Louis, Iron Mountain & Southern
track, which should reach Mission
within two weeks at which time l
expect to begin laying track.
“At the present .ime, 1 have one
grading outfit on this work and will
put on another within ten days.
However, the grading is very light
and does not require many teams.
“I expect to have this road iir
operation by July 1st.”
A special train of five cars ar
rived in Mission today with 140 pet
pie from the North.
G. H. Clay recently sold his en
tire onion crop to W. E. Nicholson
at $325 per acre net to him, on
board the cars. Mr. Nicholson has
in twenty a< res of onions this year
so you can figure out the profit for
yourself.
Two or three cars of cabbage are
being shipped from Mission each day
and a total of 125 cars will be
shipped this year. The cabbage is
yielding from 10 \o 14 tons per acre
and the market price is |440 per
ton. More figures.
SIDNA ALLEN. OUTLAW.
NOW IN VIRGINIA JAIL.
So Far Posses Have Failed to Cap
ture the Rest of the Band—Pris
oner Denies His Guilt.
Associated Press.
Hillsville. Va., March 22—Sidna
Allen, a tall rugged mountaineer,
twen.y-two years old, sits calmly in
the little brick jail here tonight the
i sole catch of the posse which has
been hunting for the outlaws wh.f
shot and killed the Judge, sheriff,
| prosecutor and twj bystanders in
• the court house a few days ago, and I
! wounded two spectators.
Allen stoutly denies his guilt.
Meanwhile the posses are scouring
the mountains for his brother, two
c'usins and uncle.
Allen was captured in a deserted
hut in the mountains. He was un
armed and offered no resistance.
” w.- mm - —mm—h
| *£****•***** »‘ £
i:
Federal Victory. *
, — "V
*•* Mexico City. March 22—
General Trucy Aubert with 500 '-J
v federals is officially reported
Jr to have defeated eighteen hun- *!*
dred rebles under General Sal
azar after five hours fighting,
-:-.20 miles north of Jinenez.
Many men on both sides are -i*
reported killed.
Associated Pres$
Chihuahua. 3f x., March 22—Un
less signs fall a big battle will be
fought soon at Escalon, mid-way be
tween Chihuahua and Torreon. The
advance guard of the federal and
rebel armies exchanged shots at
Escalon yesterday. Three thousand
rebels are massing at that point
with a strong federal force not far
away.
CASE AGAINST SUGAR ,
REFINERS RESTS.1
Associated Press.
New York, March 22—The gov
ernment rested its case against the
directors of the American Sugar Re
fining company for alleged viola
tion of the Sherman anti-trust law.
The defense will begin offering tes
timony Monday. The government is
attempting to prove that the Sugar
trust entangled Adolph Segal in
debt so it could get possession of his
sugar refinery in Philadelphia. Con
spiracy is charged.
Forty Corporations Sued.
Associated Press.
Philadelphia, Pa.. March 22—
Forty-one corporations were sued
here today for $ilQ,ftOO by the”gov
ernment attorney, for the alleged)
failure to report their net incomes
to the Internal revenue collectors.'
Fifty other suits will be filed in J
April. All the corporations are
doing business here and in this
vicinity.
Necessaries Admitted to Mexico.
Associated Press.
Washington, D. C., March 22—
The United States will not Interfere
with the legitimate exportations of
food, clothing, dry goods and hard
ware to Mexico. President Taft
and cabinet decided today that such
necessities do not come under the
meaning of the president’s procla
mation forbidding the exportation
of munitions of war during the Mex
ican revolution.
FRISCO GOOO ROADS
SPECIAL TRl HERE
ARRIVED IN BROWNSVILLE LATE
LATE LAST NIGvT
Free Lectures Will Commence Mon
day. But Interviews Will be Given
at Any Time to Those Interested
in Building of Roads.
The Frisco G:od Roads special
J.rain arrived in IBrviwnsville lale
last night, it consists of the Pull
man sleeper. ‘ Laura" and thee#
coaches, one of the latfer fitted with
the electrical apparatus for work
ing the models which demonstrate
the building of good roads.
The train is standing on the side
track oposite the passenger station
and bears painted signs designating
its purport.
Among the staff on the train are.
Supt. of Road Construction II. V.
Wells of the IT. S. Depart men’ of
A grit ulttire. and Electrical Engi
neer F. G. Baker of the Frlstsi
Lines. T. C. Hnaee, the fijprii
Good Roads evangel, also came on
the special.
The Good Roads campaign proper
will open with the free lectures on
Monday as advertised, but the of
ficials will be glad to be Interviewed
by anyone who is specially Interest
ed, at any time.
Juror Sick.
Associated Press.
Chicago. 111., Miirch C2—Owing
to the illness of a juror, the trial of
the indicted Chicago packers, who
are charged with violating the anti
trust law. adjourned today until
Monday.
Cattle Market.
Associated Press.
Kansas City. March 22—Cattle,
steady to weak; export steers $7 jo
$8.40. Hogs, steady to gtn
heavies, $7.50 to $7.60. Sheep,
steady. i_
Cotton Market.
Associated Press.
New Orleans, La., March 22—
Cotton futures closed with a steady
advance of 1 to 2 points. Spot*,
steady and unchanged.
The city council of Lufkin has
granted a franchise for a new auto
matic telephone system for that
town and work will begin soon on
its installation.
# # * * # ****************** ***** *
*
* The weather changes, and the cost *
* of living, like tariff revision is ■
* upward, but the price of ICE re- *
* mains the same. "
*
[ Peoples Ice C >. ?
* BROWNSVILLE, TEXAS ’
* *
* * ***** ************************
LAND BARGAIN No. ONE.
We ARE READY to SELL YOU the BEST of the IRRIGATED LAND
at PRICES that will make you 10 0 per cent PROFIT within SIX
MONTHS. STRONG STATEMENT but here is SNAP NO. 1.
About 30 ACRES of the very best land, half mile of loading switch
near railroad. Timber will nearly pay for clearing; drainage perfect, on
canal. $700 incumbrance past due.
PRIi LI) at $60 per acre. ONE HALF CASH, balance one and two
years at 7 per cent. This land is worth $12.", per acre, and compared
with up the branch land, $200 per acre.
MUST sell this week; you must buy this week if you get it at that
price. Only ONE CHANCE.
We have other similar BARGAINS
Rio Grande Realty and Investment
Company.
BROWNSVILLE, TEXAS
VALLEY LAND FOR SALE OR EXCHANGE FOR OTHER PROPERTY
No. 219. BROWNSVILLE. 160 acre farm all In cultivation
and irrigation. Within 3-4 mile of Ry. and switch. The soil is
a dark loam and well adapted to truck, cotton, corn, auger cane
etc. Owing to location, is well adapted to being cut Into llttl*
$90 per acre. 1-3 cash, bal. 1, 2 yrs.truck farms .* 5 to 10 acfes. Price
HALLAM COLONIZATION COMPANY, Browawl-^Cu. , '

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