OCR Interpretation


Brownsville herald. [volume] (Brownsville, Tex.) 1910-current, March 25, 1912, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of North Texas; Denton, TX

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063730/1912-03-25/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

17 COMOTHITY SILVES ^ HOT MOT IltfflS
Guaranteed SO Yean 1^| 1^) W ****0n
r’ville Hardware Co 1 lllllVXii-iL/* Br’vilic Hardware Co
VOL. XIX, NO 182. BROWNSVILLE. TEXAS, MONDAY, MARCH 25, 1912.. PRICE FIVE CENTS.
PARR
■ « ERE WHERE PROGRESS MEANS GO.
ERE IN THE RICHEST VALLEY ON EARTH.
ERE WHERE PRICES SUIT THE BUYERS.
* * EKE WHERE WE ALL WANT YOU TO COME.
A PLACE TO LIVE THAT IS UNEXCELLED.
PLACE TO DO BUSINESS UNEQUALLED.
PLACE OF OPPORTUNITIES UNSURPASSED.
PLACE “WHERE THINGS MOVE UNPARELLED.
RIO GRANDE RIVER SUPPLIES ~~ mATER.
IO GRANDE RIVER HAS MADE OU R SOIL.
IO GRANDE VALLEY THE PLACE TO LIVE
IO GRANDE CAPITOL THE PLACE TO COME.
Remember the best town in the valley.
EMEMBER WHERE WE ARE LOCATED.
EMEMBER HIDALGO, COUNTY, TEXAS.
EMEMBER FOR SO DAYS LOTS WILL BE CHEAP.
W. E. Cage
SALES AGfcNT
FORGET YOUR TROUBLES AND COME.
FORGET YOU HAVE EVER DOUBTED. I J
KNOCK AT THE DOOR AND IT WILL OPEN. 1'^
SEEK AND YOU WILL FIND US. , ~
BUY WHAT WE OFFER YOU AND YOU « »
WILL ALWAYS BE GLAD.
BUY A HOME AND YOUR WIFE WILL
THINK MORE OF YOU. - *
COME AND CONSULT WITH US AND YOU A
WILL ENJOY YOUR TRIP. ^
COME AND IGOK FOR YOURSELF AND *
YOU WILL BE CONVINCED. *
ASK FOR WHAT YOU WANT AND WE
WILL SHOW YOU WE HAVE IT.
ASK FOR THE TERMS YOU WISH AND
WE WILL TRY TO ACCOMODATE YOU.
P A R R
I

I
i
I

I
,
I
I
I
I
I
I

I
k
___ i
River Forty Miles Wide.
Associated Press.
St Lou.s, Mo., March 24—Flood
conditions prevaif along the Mis
souri, Misisssippi and Ohio rivers.
The Mississippi river below Cairo,
111., reaches from the hills of Mis
souri to the hills of Kentucky, and is
for.y miles wide in some places. The
lowlands in Illinois, Missouri and
Kentucky are under several feet of
water. The river wil continue to
rise below Cairo for several days on
ecount of the heavy rains.
. ... 7: \S* . * - ) * ‘ -•
Released from Quarantine.
Associated Press.
Washington, D. C\, March 2 4—
Secretary Wilson will issue an order
Monday releasing King and Pecos
counties, Texas, from th?~cattle tick
fever quarantine. Also portions of
Howard and Terrell counties wTll be
included.
Weather Forecast.
Associated Press.
Washington, D. C., March 24 —
East Texas, Monday and Tuesday
fair; warmer Monday., West Texas,
Monday fair; warmer Tuesday with
increasing cloudiness.
. 7 . A... ....
STRICT CENSORSHIP
IN BOTH CAMPS
NEWS OF BATTLE IS HOURLY
EXPECTED.
The Rebel Forces Near Jirainez Num
ber Three Thousand—Federate
Two Thousand—New Minister to
Washington Appointed.
Associated Press.
Mexico City, March 124—Although
newspaper correspondents are in the
camps of both federals and rebels in
the neighborhood of Jiimnez and
Esealon, both commanders maintain
a strict censorship and no news can
be obtained by telegraph.
It is understo d that Orozco’s
army has three thousand men at
Esealon and that the government has
two thousand soldiers not far south
of Esealon.
News of a decisive battle at any
time will not surprise the capital.
Government officials expres them
selves as certain that the rebel-; will
be defeated when the battle is
f ught.
Within a few days Manuel Calero,
minister of foreign affairs, will turn
over his portfolio to Pedro Lascruin.
and go to Washington as Mexican
ambassador.
Francisco de la Barra is ex peeved
j to arrive here April 5.
CAMPA CLAIMS
REBEL VICTORY.
Claims Federate Lost One Hundred
in Killed—Says He Has Them at
His Mercy.
Associated Press.
Jiminez, Mex., March 24 — As a re
sult of three day’s lighting ending
today, General Cam pa claims a rebel
victory in engagements around Esea
lon. He reports the enemies’ dea 1
at one hundred, and that he has cap
tured two machine guns and thirty
prisoners.
Yesterday an engine loaded with
f rty boxes of dynamite was sent
under full head of steam against
an armored train bearing federal
troops on their way :o Esealon. The
engine telescoped the armoured train
engine and first coach, the dynamite
exploding at the same time. Sixty
federals were killed.
The federals detrained and pre
pared for defense, and after skirm
ishing with (\vnpa retreated las':
night to Carralitos, south of Jimi
nez. The federal forces today oc
cupied Esealon two thousand strong.
Campa says lie has sent "a force
south of Esealon to cut the railroad
and prevent reinforcements coming
to the aid of the federals and has
them at his mercy.
LIMITS STATED
IN CIVIL SERVICE
LATEST RULING FOR EMPLOYES
OF GOVERNMENT.
Federal Officeholders May Act as
Delegates to Convention to Frame
Constitutions—May Not be Dele
gates to Political Conventions.
Associated Press.
Washington, D. March 2 4 —
The president has made a ruling that
defines the degree of activity, per
nicious or otherwise, that may be
practiced by government officials in
the classified service.
They may without offense act as
delegates to conventions called to
frame stale constitutions.
They are firbidden to take part
in the management of political cam
paigns.
They are forbidden to aet as dele
gates to political conventions.
This ruling was made public Kat
urrtay by the civil service commis
sion.
New York Primaries Tusday
Associated Press.
New York, March 24—The pri
mary election to elect delegates to
the republican national convention
will be held throughout the State
Tuesday. The Rx>sevelt forces will
make no attempt to capture delegates
outside of Xewr York city. The Taft
managers claim an overwhelming
majority in the city and state.
A promise should be made with
caution and kept with care. It
should be made with the heart and
kept with the head.—William H.
Baldwin. J
VI_I
SMI BENITO UNO
TO HAVE DRMNAGE
'
PETITION FOR DRAINAGE DIS
TRICT GOES THROUGH.
J
Formation of District Hotly Con
tested in County Commissioners'
Cour for Two Days by the Owners
of Rio Hondo Tract.
At the county commissioners'
court on Saturday, the hearing of
the petitioners for the formation of
Cameron County Drainage,) District
No. ti, at San Benito, was con.inued.
and proceeded at a much 'more rapid
rate than on the preceding day. Sev
eral witnesses were examined, and
the objections of counsel were not
so frequent as at Friday's meeting.
Tlie witnesses to take the stand
yes erday were, with the sole ex
ception of Neill McDonald of Rio
Hondo, all witnesses introduced by
Judge Samuel Spears for the peti
tioners.
The first witness to take the stand
was J. G. Hall, the government
drainage engineer. Mr. Hall testi
fied that he had Veen over the 'ter
ritory from San Benito to the "Rio
Grande and that tpe country needed
drainage in order' to carry off the
[•surface water, and that subsoil in
vestigation showed thaL the ground
was filled with water, that the water
table was rising, and 'that this
caused the rise of alkali, but that
j drainage would relieve this situa
tion. Mr. Hall further testified that J
as a rule irrigation without drain
age was impossible, and that sur-j
fat'e drainage was inadequate. Judge
I Hawkins, coun-el for contestants,
waived cross examination.
R. C. Wharton was the next wit-!
1 ness called t> the stand. Upon be
i ing sworn Mr. Wharton stated that
early in life he had been educated
and practiced as a civil engineer,
j that he had resided in this part of
| the country for about six years and
j was of the opinion that irrigation
i without drainage was impracticable
1 on account of the alkali in the soil.
| Mr. Whart n said that as a rule In
this section of the country natural
j drainage did nof exist. The wit
j ness further said Hiat the land in
the Rio Hondo tract might have very
good surface drainage but that good
: surface drainage was not sufficient.
When asked how it was possible to
I determine whether or not land
| needed sub-drainage, Mr. Wharton
| replied that the proper method was
I to make a soil survey of the partieul
lar piece -of land, and if the ground
j water was found at a satisfactory
I distance from the surface and did
not rise in the test holes after a con
siderable period of irrigation it
would show that the land had suf
ficient drainage, while if on the
other hand the water table did rise
•!hen artificial ub-drainage would
! become necessary. Mr. Whart n
said he thaught that sub-drainage
was necessary throughout the whole
of the dislrict.
Upon cross examination the wit
ness said that lie had never yet been
[able to find land in lie Valley thal
did not need drainage of some kind,
and that the land along the Arroyo
Colorado must contain alkali on ac
count of its geological formation.
a lie next witness was Secretary
Graham of the San Benito Commer
cial Club. Mr. Graham stated that
lie had spent the most of his life in
irrigated districts and that, lie had
never yet seen one that did not need
drainage. Judge Hawkins said that
in order to save time he was ready
»i:Jo admit that drainage was necessary
i and that his only contention was
! that the Rio Hondo district already
had it.
Mr. Carpenter, civil engineer,
under whose supervision the district
was planned, was the next witness
called tc* the stand, and upon being
sworn, testified that as a rule all
the land in the district sloped away
from the water ways, and that ar
tificial drainage 'was noces-ary.
Judge Hawkins again objected on
the gr.unds that the necessity of
drainage had already been admitted.
C. E. Barber, the next witness,
said that he was of the opinion that
drainage in the Rio Hondo strip was
necessary.
Colonel Alba Heywood testifed
■that he had been over the land along
the Arroyo and that he regarded the
drainage as proposed, both feasible
and practicable.
Upon ero.-s examination Col. Hey
wood said that he did not regard the
Rio Hondo strip, or any other 1,000
acres of land as essential to the life
of the district. Col. Heywood further
stated that he did not think that
(Continued op page three.)
/« Ai jW j
1 V x
I BOTH CANDIDATES
CLAIM INDIANA
TAFT’S MANAGER SEEMS SURE
OF HIS GROUND.
McKinley, at Headquarters in Wash
ington, Announces that President
Will Control State Convention by
Clear Majority of 250.
Associated Press.
Washing?! n, 1). C., March 24 —
The Roosevelt and the Taft factions
of the republican party appear to
differ In their estimates of the re
sults of Saturday's primaries in the
state of Indiana.
However, Manager McKinley is
imsitive in his announcement *ihat
the Taft forces are the winners. Ho
declares ihat Taft will control the
state convention Tuesday by a ma
jority of at least 2."»n.
He says Taft will have twenty
two out of thirty Indiana delegates
to the Chicago convention.
Senator Dixon at the Roosevelt
headquarters, tonight claimed eight
out of thirteen distdiets and claims
control of the Indiana s,atc Conven
tion for Roosevelt.
Unofficial returns of the republi
can primaries of Friday and Satur
day held in Indiana indicate that
Taft carried seven districts and
Roosevelt six.
Returns indicate tha, Taft’s forces
have 7X1 and Roosevelt 616 dele
gates ■*o the state convention which
meets in Indianapolis Tuesday. If
the figures are cored Taft will have
eighteen and R osevelt twelve dele
gates at the national republican
convention at Chicago.
COMMISSION STATES
NEW PRINGIPLS
JUSTICE DONE REGARDLESS OF
STATE LINES.
Where State Commission Forces Rail
road to Make Low Rates it Must
Accord Same Rierht to Interstate
Trafliic Under like Conditions.
Associated Press.
Washing n, I). March 24
The lutersta.e Commerce Commis
sion in an opinion made public to
day, established the far reaching
principles that railroads must so ad
just rates that justice will be done
between all communities, regardless
of state lines.
If a railr ad makes a low rate
upon traffic wholly within the state,
even if forced to do so by the stale
railroad commission, it must accord
I ihe same rate to interstate traffic
moving under substantially the sam •
condition-.
The principle was laid down by a
v te of four o three. The minority
held that the powers of congre.-s
was ursurped by the majority opin
ion. The ease wherein the decision
was rendered was the Railroad Con -
mission of Louisian against the Cot
ton Belt and other railroads operat
ing between Texas and Louisiana
points. Tlie Ixiui-iana Conm)i»ion
complained that rates from Dallas to
Texas points near the Louisiana line
were much lower than the in?.^tstate
rates from Shreveport, La., to the
same points, although the points in
question were near to Shrevepor .
ALLEN BAND CLOSELY
PRESSED BY PURSUERS.
Claude Allen Not Located—Others
Surrounded in Blue Ridge Moun
tains—Must Soon Be Taken.
Associated Press.
Galax, Va., March 24—C^aud
Swanson Allen, son of Floyd Allen,
one of those indicted for the Hills-|
ville court house murders, has clean
ly eluded all pursuit, hut his uncle,
Sidna Allen and cousins, Wesley Ed
wards and Friel Allen are closely
pressed on the south side of the
Blue Ridge mountains and they will
probably be captured in two or three
days. The gang entered the court,
house at Hillsville Slarch 14 and
killed the judge, sheriff, prosecutor,
one juror and wounded several spec
tators.
With 48 per cent of the children
of scholastic age in rural districts
absent from scheol every day, and
districts in which live 650,000 chil
dren without high school privileges,
Texas still has much to db to give
nil her children equal adxajtJ&erjf-*.
— 'Baer at Box 52::,
Brownsville, J-19-tf
i h '
AMERICAN TEACHERS
HURT IN CHINN
THREE MEN ATTACKED AT WU
SHAN BY PIRATES.
Chinese Bandits Kill One Teacher
and Wound Others — Murdered
Man Was from Wisconsin—News
Comes from Legation at Peking.
Associated Press.
Peking, China, March 24—The
American legation received a tele
gram today saying tiia< three Amer
ican teachers had been attacked at
Wu Shan.
One was killed and the others
were wounded.
The man wh) was kill'd was
named Hicks, and his home was
formerly in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The
names of the wounded men are Hoff
man and Sheldon.
The report was sent hy the Amer
ican consul at Chung King. The
consul said the attack was made hy
pirates and did n >t grow out of rat e
hatred.
The wounded men started for
Ichang, carrying the body of rlick'
with them.
Further information lias been re
Muested by the legation.
Associated Press.
Oshkosh, VV’is., March 21 Bert
Hicks, who was killed in China to
day by pirates, was the son of K. H.
flicks, former attorney general of
Wisconsin. He was 2.‘> years old.
Young Hicks went to China eighteen
months ago to establish a school of
m i nja*———^
BUYERS WILL PH
COST OF STRIKE
COTTON AND WOOLEN GOODS
COST MORE.
Great Lawrence Strike Officially
Ended — Results In Advance of
Wages of Textile Workers—Will
Mean Increased Price to Consumer.
Associated 1’rcss.
Boston, Maas., March 21—The
great Imwrencc, Mass., strike, which
brought in its wake Increased wages*
for two hundred and seventy-five t
thousand textile workers In the New '
England states, was officially de
clared off at all mills In l*awrenee
today, having accomplished its pur
poses in the opinion of the leaders.
The other manufacturing Industrie
of New England have advanced
wages during the Iasi few weeks.
The advances in the price of rol
lon and v mien goods in nrospeel
will probably place much of the bur
den of .hr increased wages upon
I lie ultimate consumer. This will
aggregate between ten and twelve
million dollars within the next year.
The mill agents in announcing the
advance in prices frankly staled that
the upward trend Is the result of
the wage increases. The increase in
cotton goods per yard are not an
nounced as yet, and the exact ad
vance of woolens is not fully do- v
eided by the mill owners.
o’clck this afternoon an automobile
drive will be arranged to Poll*
Isabel in order that the experts may
give the local good roads enthusiasts t
an idea as to the proper kind of road
to build betwen here and Point
Isabel and the approxima.c coat of
establishing the road.
A telegram wan received by Mr.
Wells yesterday Informing him that
.1. W. Thurman of Gainesville. Texas,
and J. F. Herbert of Jennings. lai.
representatives of the Yoakum Good
Roads party will join the train. The
gentlemen are expected to arrive to
day. A ful acount of the Y takuin
Good Roads movement will be found
in another place in the Herald.
The exhibit car. open at nine
o'clock this morning will remain
open during the entire day. The
stereopticon lecture# will he held at
the car at 2 in the afternoon
Mr. Charles Wilbur de l.yon Nich
olls says th;*t there are only per
sons in American fashionable society
If that's reall/ so, things are li
nearly as bad as we had feared. -
Philadelphia North American.
EXHIBIT TRAIN
NOW ON TRACK
CdT Open at Nine This Morning.
Stereopticon Lecture at Car this
Afternoon at 2.
At 9 o’clock this m 'ruing the C.oo<1
Roads campaign of the Frisco rail
road, which is to sweep over the en
tire United States, will l»e inaugu
rated in Brownsville. The long,
white cars of the train have arrived
and the men in charge of the excur
sion are awaiting the gathering of
the citizens of Brownsville and the
Valley to explain to them tlie art of
building and maintaining good roads
and the proper kind of road to put
in. Not only will H. f\ Wells of the
department of agriculture and TT. S.
Fairbanks of the American associa
tion of highways, talk good roads,
atul the organization of good roads
association from the cars, but at 1
****** ******** ********** ***** *
* ♦
l The weather changes, and the cost *
% of living, like tariff revision is ;
* upward, but the price of ICE re- ♦
+ mains the same.
I Peoples Ice Co. !
* BROWNSVILLE, TEXaS I
* *
*
* ***** ************************
LAND BARGAIN No. ONE
We ARE READY to SELL YOU the BEST or the IRRIGATED LAND
at PRICES that will make you 100 per cent PROFIT within SIX
MONTHS. STRONG STATEMENT but here is SNAP NO. 1.
About 30 ACRES of the very beat land, half mile of loading switch
near railroad. Timber will nearly pay for clearing; drainage perfect, on
canal. $700 incumbrance past due.
I*HI< ED at $60 per a«re. ONE HALF CASH, balance one and two
years at 7 percent. This land is worth $12."* per acre, and compared
with up the branch land, $‘200 per acre.
MUST sell this week: you must buy this week if you get it at that
price. Only ONE CHANCE.
We have other similar BARGAINS
Rio Grande Realty and Investment
Company.
BROWNSVILLE, TEXAS
*
VALLEY LAND FOR SALE OR EXCHANGE FOR OTRER PROPERTY
No. 219. BROWNSVILLE. 160 acre farm all in cultivation
|and irrigation. Within 3-4 mile of Ry. and switch The soil It
a dark loam and well adapted to truck, cotton, corn, sugar can#
— etc Owing to location, is well adapted to being cit Into llttli
*
$90 per acre. 1-3 cash, bal. 1, 2 yrs.truck farms «♦ 5 to 10 acr*a. Price
.. uAl.LAM COLONIZATION COMPANY, Rrnwngvill^Jex.
T* V ____ . vnsvicc

xml | txt