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Brownsville herald. [volume] (Brownsville, Tex.) 1910-current, April 18, 1912, Image 1

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\; ^ VOL. XIX. NO. 203. BROWNSVILLE^ TEXAS, THURSDAY, APRIL 18. 1912. PRICE FIVE CENTS.
PARR
* * ERE WHERE PROGRESS MEANS GO. f
ERE IN THE RICHEST VALLEY ON EARTH.
♦ ERE WHERE PRICES SUIT THE BUYERS. j
* ERE WHERE WE AJLL WANT YOU TO COME.
J'
A PLACE TO LIVE THAT IS UNEXCELLED.
PLACE TO DO BUSINESS UNEQUALLED.
PLACE OE OPPORTUNITIES UNSURPASSED.
PLACE WHERE THINGS MOVE UNPARELLED.
RIO GRANDE RIVER SUPPLIES OUR WATER. |r
10 GRANDE RIVER HAS MADE OUR SOIL. '
IO GRANDE VALLEY THE PLACE TO LIVE.
10 GRANDE CAPITOL THE PLACE TO COME. /
Remember the best town in the valley.
EMEMBER WHERE WE ARE LOCATED. t *
EMEMBER HIDALGO, COUNTY, TEXAS. ,
EMEMBER FOR 30 DAYS LOTS WILL BE CHEAP.
*
W. E. Cage
SALES AGENT
FORGET YOUR TROUBLES AND COME. *
FORGET YOU HAVE EVER DOUBTED. f'] . , I J
KNOCK AT TIIE DOOR AND IT WILL OPEN.
SEEK AND YOU WILL FIND US. jf A.
BUY WHAT WE OFFER YOU AND YOU f j m
WILL ALWAYS BE GLAD. f ^
BUY A HOME AND YOUR WIFE WILL ' f y
THINK MORE OF YOU. t >1 •
L
COME AND CONSULT WITH US AND YOU ~ A
WILL ENJOY YOUR TRIP. f *
COME AND LOOK FOR YOURSELF AND
YOU WILL BE CONVINCED. / j £g ft ^
ASK FOR WHAT YOU WANT AND WE » r /
WILL SHOW YOU WE HAVE IT. f II
ASK FOR THE TERMS YOU WISH AND **
WE WILL TRY TO ACCOMODATE YOU. “ ^
P A R R
I While In the Valley :
DON’T FAIL TO VISIT |
MISSION.
I
I
Elevation, 14o feet.
Irrigation, unexcelled.
Drainage, natural.
WE PROVE IT
To be the most progressive, high
ly developed, prosperous, thriv
> >
ing proposition in the Lower Rio
, Grande Valley. k
| A personal investigation will con
vince you of the greater advan
» tages and opportunities offered. '
i MISSION UNO IMPROVEMENT COMPANY I!
I MISSION, TEXAS ]
JOHN J. CONWAY
1 Preaident V Sole Own 1
* »
W0i0i0*m0*V0**r**'*'w*^**—**'0***m**mmm ■» minm
Cotton Market.
Associated Press.
New Orleans. La., April 17- Cot
ton futures closed steady with a net
advance of 19 to 21 points. Spots
firm, to 1-8 up.
* Cattle Market.
Associated Press.
Kansas City. Mo.. April 17—Cat
tle steady to 10 cents lower: e\t»ort
steers $7.60 to $8.55. Hogs steady
• to 5 cents low er* heavies $7.00 to $8.
Sheep 10 to 15 cents higher.
Cattle Importation.
Customs house broker David Malt
■ by yesterday crossed fif ty-three head
of cattle from the Mexican side of
the river.
Weather Forecast.
Associated Press.
Washington. D. C. April 17—West
Texas, fair Thursday, except showers
in the Panhandle; Friday fair. East
Texas, fair in the south, local rains
in the north Thursday; Friday prob
ably fair.
AMERICANS STRIKE
ON MEXICAN ROADS
FIVE HUNDRED TRAINMEN QUIT
THEIR JOBS.
Railroad Officials Say They Are Able
to Run Cars Without Interruption
Except Where Trains Put Out of,
Commission by Rebels.
_
Associated Press.
Mexico City, April 17—The Amer-j
ican engineers and conductors on the
National railways of Mexico walked
out at noon today, almost to a man.
Their action was based on the re
fusal of the railroad management to
accede to their demands, the prin
cipal of which was that the order
requiring train orders to be written
in Spanish be suspended.
There are approximately five hun
dred Americans in the employ of the
Mexican railways. Of these only
ten have signified their intention of
remaining at work.
The railroad management assert I
that except where trains are put out
of commision by the rebels, they con
tinue to run without interruption.
They claim to have sufficient men
available to operate all trains, both
freight and passenger.
OLD FERRY BARGE CABLE
HAS BEEN REMOVED
- I
Last Vestige of Primitive Methods by
Which Probably, Millions of Dol
lars Worth of Goods Transported.
From today Brownsville will be
minus a landmark which for 35 years
has been a familiar sight. Judge E.
C. Forto announced yesterday that
the old barge cable, which for so
many years has been spanning the
Rio Grande at the freight ferry will
be taken down.
Another evidence of progress, as
the freight now goes across by rail.
The international bridge across the
river at this point caused the barge
service to be abandoned. But the
old barges and the stout cable by
# ~
w hich. they, w ore pulled back and
forth served well the purpose of
freight transportation between
Brownsville and Matamoros in their
day. The amount of traffic which
passed by the barge route probably1
would surprise the average person.
For a great many years all of the
freight for the city of Matamoros J
and the outlying settlements and
ranches of this section of Tamau-j
lipas was received by steamer via j
Point Isabel and Brownsville being
ferried across the river by barge.
In her palmy days Matamoros l
merchants carried very extensive!
stocks of imported goods of various
kinds. The richest of silks, laces,
fine jewels and other costly articles
were sold there, and the Matamoro!:
trade was very important.
-!
Paving Company Buys a Hat.
An indignant citizen with a bat
tered new straw hat confronted the
representatives of the National Creo
soted Wood Block Paving company
Tuesday afternoon, with a demand
for compensation for the los* of the
aforesaid head covering. The hat, i
which looked somewhalt as if it
might have been <-ast into the ring
before the recent election by one of
the candidates who didn’t win, prob
ably saved the owner from a bruised
head.
It was demolished by a branch of
a falling tree which was being cut
down by orders of the paving com
pany. The wearer passed under the
tree to speak to a representative of
the company about some damage toi
tlie fence around the former’s prop
erty alleged to have been caused by
the falling tree. Just at this mo-I
ment the branch fell, catching the'
hat and destroying any semblance
which it may have borne to the lat
est spring styles. The wearer in
dignantly demanded damages at
once.
The paving man was about to turn
away, when the hat owner adroitly
placed the smashed headgear on the
former’s head and then backed away
refusing to receive it again. The
paving man finally hung the hat on
the fence, and went and reported the
affair to Superintendent Hudson,
who immediately bought another hat
just like the damaged one and pre
sented it to the claimant.
Battle in Sonora.
Associated Press.
El Paso, Texas, April 17—Bavispe,
in the state of Soronra, Mexico, has
fallen into the hands of the rebels
sent out from Juarez, according to
telegraphic advises received here to
day. Eleven federate and four rebels
BETTER REGULATION
OF OCEAN TRAFFIC
_____
CONGRESS WOULD MINIMIZE
DANGER TO SHIPS.
Bills and Resolutions Pour Into Con
gress Yesterday—Designed to Pre
vent Repetition of Disaster Like
That to Steamer Titanic.
Associated Press.
Washington, D. 0., April 17—
('ongress acted swiftly today on the
Titanic catastrophe. Hills and reso
lutions designed to prevent the re
currance of such disasters poured
into both houses.
In the senate a resolution deciding
a thorough investigation by the com
mence committee into the causes
leading to the wreck with particular
reference to inadequate life boats
was agreed to.
Other resolutions introduced pro
posed that the president be advised
that the senate would be in favor oi
treaties with maritime nations to
regulate the safety of ocean craft,
passengers and crews and for the
equipment of steamers with adequate
life saving apparatus.
Two resolutions were Introduced
into the house. One would direct
the maritime nations of the world to
ippoint members on an interna;ional
ommission to define ship laws and
routes, and to minimise the dangers
)f collisions at sea.
The other would extend similar
invitations to nations interested in
Xorth Atlantic steamship travel, to
form a commission to arrange for a
[>atrol of Xorth Atlantic waters to
warn ships.
MEXICO SENDS NEW CONSUL
ro Replace Silvino Garcia. Who is
Ordered to the Front.
Hon. Federico Mendoza y Vizcaino
3f Mexico City, who arrived in
Brownsville Monday night, is the
newly appointed Mexican consul at
Brownsville. Senor Mendoza has
come to take the place of Consul
Silvino Garcia, who has been trans
ferred to another branch of the ser
vice at Morelos. The new consul
assumed charge of the* consulate,
when Mr. Garcia checked over
everything to his successor.
Mr. Garcia is expected to leave
very soon for Morelos, where it is
said he will enter active military
service.
KILLED BY FALL
FROM CONSTRUCTION CAR
S?d Accident on Interurban Near San
Benito—Jose Ponce Lost Life
While Unloading Piling.
Jose I’once, a laborer on the inter
urban line which is being built be
twen San Benito and Santa Maria,
was killed yesterday morning near
San Benito by falling from a car of
pilings and being struck on the lie;
by one of the piles.
Justice of the Peace Gavito was
called and went to San Benito yes
terday evening for the purpose of
holding an inquest. The story of
the unfortunate man's death is told
in the statement of F. S. Robertson,
as follows:
“On the morning of April 17, about
11:20, there was a gang of twenty
men on a coal car unloading piling
Jose Ponce was standing on the end
of the car with one foot on the side
of the car and one foot on the end
of the car. As the pile was rolled
ofT, or just before it left the car, Jose
seemed to lose his balance and fall
head first and backward off the car,
lighting on the ground on the .
of the railroad embankment on his
back with his head down. The pil
ing was following and struck him in
the back as near as I could tell. 1
was standing on the top of the same
car but at the opposite end.
“I jumped down and called some
men to help him up and put him on
a oar and brought him to San Be
nito, having sent Duke Jones in my
auto before me to find a doctor and
bring him to us. Dr. Garnett met
us at the San Benito station and
pronounced the man already dead.
"I then had him taken to Pease's
undertaking establishment and sent
for the coroner.
“The accident occurred about lu
miles from San Benito on the line
of the interurban railway, where
the Santa Maria branch now bein$
built crosses the San Benito Land &
Water company's main canal.”
| ROLL OF SAVED
SEEMS OOMPLEIE
CARPATHIA SLOWLY MAKING
WAY TOWARD HARBOR.
A List of Third Cabin Passengers
Relayed Last Night Through
Scout Cruiser Chester—First and
Second Cabin Lists Practically In.
.Associated Press.
New York. April 17—The roll of
the saved from the Titanic tonight
seems complete.
That 1,312 lives were taken as
toll when the giant liner crashed
into an iceberg off the New Found
land coast Sunday night, is regarded
as certain.
The Carpathia, making her way to
New York with survivors, sent
a list of the third cabin passengers
tonight and a message sent through
the scout cruiser Chester said that
a full list of the first and second
cabin passengers safe aboard had
almost been sent in its entirety.
The Carpathia is about six hun
dred miles from this port and is ex
pected to dock here early tomorrow
night.
The first story of how scores went
to death, and the incidents in con
nection with the Titanic ^(jiking the
iceberg will be known in detail for
. . . ',li
the first time, unless the stQry is sent
out from the Carpathia by Wireless
in the meantime. It is a curious fact
that up to the present no word has
been allowed to come from her in re
lation to the big liner's movements.
Associated Press.
15os»on, Mass., April 17—"The
bodies of the victims of the Titanic
disaster are at the bottom of the
deep, never to leave,” declared Prof.
Hubert Wood, of the chair of ex
perimental physics, of John Hopkins
University today. "It is altogether
improbable that any corpses will
ever return to the surface as in the
case of bodies drowned in shallow
water.”
_UVEH *
COUNTY SCHOOL TRUSTEES
ELECTED ARftlL 12
Voting Very Light—No Election in
Six Districts—Results Announced
by County Commissioners.
The county commissioners’ court
yesterday afternoon canvassed the
returns of the school trustee election
held two weeks ago. The returns
show the following resulw:. •
Trustee at large, A. Olaya.
For Com. Free. 1, Charles Cham
pion.
For Com. Prec. No. 2, J. P. Cot
tingham.
For Com. Prec. No. 3, George IV
Falligant.
For Com. Prec. No. 4, W. H. Jorsig.
The .polling of votes wps very
light. In districts two, three, four
five, seven and eight there was no
election. In district No. 1 each of
the candidates received 26 votes. In
district No. six all excepting Mr.
Cottingham received 16 votes. Mr.
Cottingham polled nine. In dis
trict. No. eleven each candidate re
ceived 55 votes, while in district No.
twelve only sixteen votes were polled
for each candidate. ,r..
In addition to the election of coun
ty trustees, each district was to vote
for district trustees. Those who were
elected to this office were as follows:
District Nol, ltamon Delgado and
Antonio Vallente.
No. 6, W. B. Newhall amd W. II.
Mead.
No. 9, J. C. Bennett, S. O. Tansill
and V. W. Biggs.
No. 11, Julian Vera and Jesus
Vera.
In the precincts where there was
no election held, it will be the duty
of the county school superintendent
to appoint trustee*
With the exception of the ap
pointment of Phil Barbour to the of
fice of justice of the peace, this was
the only important action of the aft
ernoon at the commissioners' court
DRAINAGE ENGINEER S
REPORT IS APPROVED
San Fenito Drainage District Will
Vote on $450,667.28 Bond Issue
on May 9th.
The coun’y commissioners' court
met yesterday morning for the pur
pose of hearing the report of Ward
Carpenter, district engineer for Cam
eron County Drainage District No.
Three (the San Benito district).
The court approved the report and
ordered an election to be held in
the district on May 9 for the pur
pose of seeing whether or not tht
land owners shall vote to l»suf
$450,667.28 In bonds for the pur
pose of draining the district.
COLONEL IN OMAHA
SCORES PRESIDENI
CONDEMNS EVIL INSTRUMENTS
FOR DIRTY WORK.
Roosevelt Makes Bitter Speech in
Omaha—Says Taft Could Not Carry
One State in Ten Were it Left to
Popular Vote.
As-ooiated Press.
Omaha, Neb., April 17—‘‘It is not
a nice thing to use evil instruments
in order to do dirty work,” said Tot
Roosevelt tonight in an attack, in
a speech, upon the supporters of the
Taft administration,
“It is even a less nice thing to
throw evil instruments aside when
they arc broken and loudly make
believe that they are not used in
tentionally.”
Roosevelt charged the Taft man
agers with a helpless acquiesenee in
Taft were relying sol<>ly upon bosses
who stand for what is worst in our
political life.
“There is not one state out of ten
in which Mr. Taft would have any
chance if the vote were left to the
people themselves,” he asserted dur
ing the address.
Roosevelt said Lorimer and Penrose
recognize in Taft the kind of pro
gressive whom they are willing to
clasp to their hearts.
NEW PHONE SYSTEM
READY BY SEPTEMBER.
Will Be Equal in Efficiency to Those
of Any Texas City, and Will Ac
commodate 2.000 Subscribers.
F. W. Yenson, chief engineer for
the Southwestern Telephone com
pany, who has been in the city mak
ing arrangements for the installa
tion of the new telephone plant in
this city, informs the Herald that
the new' system probably will be
ready for operation by September.
The new switchboard, which is
to be located on the second floor of
the Stegman building, is what is
known as a multiple common bat
tery board No. 10. It is being made
by the Western Electric company,
which has contracted to have the
board here the latter part of June
or the first of July. It Is estimated
that it will take about sixty days
to install the board and have it ready
for operation. The new equipment
will accommodate 2,000 subscribers.
The outside plant is to be placed in
the very best condition and will be
able to take care of almost any
amount of subscribers. As the in
side equipment will be all new and
every telephone in town will have
to be changed, the eomivany has un
dertaken a very large and expensive
task. When it is completed, Browns
ville will have an equipment fully
as up-to-date as 'those of San An
tonio, Houston or Dallas.
Mr. Yenson expressed himself as
being highly pleased with the town,
coinciding heartily with the ex
pressions of the company’s general
commercial superintendent, 1*. K.
Baker, who wras here three or four
weeks ago. Mr. Baker upon his re
turn to Dallas informed the oflire
that he had found Brownsville a
live and progressive town, much
better, in fact, than he had ex
pected. Mr. Yenson left yesterday
af'ernoon for points up the Valley.
[MEXICO REPLIES
10 WILSON NOTE
EXCEPTS TO COMMUNICATION
SENT TO OROZCO.
President Madero Declines to Assume
Responsibility for Acts of Rebel
Leaden—Says Wilson Note Not
Based on Justifiable Incident.
Associated Press.
Mexico City. April 17—Mexico re
plied to the note of Acting Secretary
of State Huntington Wilson tonight,
declining to assume responsibility for
the rebel general, Paseual Orozco, jr.,
and denying the right of the Wash
ington government to deliver the ad
monition contained therein, taking
exception to a communication direct
ed to Orozco through Consul Letcher,
and deplored the fact that the com
munication was made public in the
same note to which the Mexican
government is required to make an
answer.
The reply says the reason the right
of the Washing ton government gov
ernment to admonish Mexico is de
nied is that it is not based on any
justifiable incident.
It denies the responsibility of the
Madero government for acts commit
ted in territory removed from
obedience to law as contrary to the
principles of international law, while
accepting full responsibility for every
lo^s or damage sustained by for
eigners legally chargeable to ,the
Mexican government.
Orozco is held to be answerable to
the Mexican courts only for his of
fenses and therefore should not have
been the recipient of a diplomatic
communication as he was when
Consul Letcher recently delivered to
him a warning from Washington to
respect the lives of the Americans in
Mexico.
_m i
SERIOUS BREAK t
ON LOWER RIVER
A Break in Levee Above Greenville,
Miss.. Will Flood Several Countie*.
Villages Inundated.
Associated Press.
New Orleans, La., April 17 -On©
Mississippi river levee gave way to
night forty miles north of Green
ville, Miss., and the flogd waters will
sweep over all of one county and a
portion of four others. Seven . vil
lages are on the of the flood
and the water may reach a couple of
others.
A break is also reported in the Ar
kansas river, fifteen miles north of
Arkansas t'ity, but those conversant
with the situation say the result will
Only add to the discomfort caused
by the back water.
The break above Greenville Is re
garded as the most serious of any
in the lpwcr reaches of the river. It
is the first along the Mississippi
shore.
—- ---■— *
Alabama For Underwood.
Associated Press.
Montgomery, Ala., April 17—Th©
democratic convention instructed Its
delegates to vote for Oscar W. ITnder
wood as the nominee of the party
until the nomination is made at the
Ilaltimore convention.
Similar Instructions were given by
the district conventions, and th*
state's allotted 24 votes will ha cast
as a unit for Underwood until the •
end of the ballotting.
a************* ********** ***** *
* •
* The weather changes, and the cost j
$ of living, like tariff revision is *
* upward, but the price of ICE re- J
t mains the same. *
IP oples Ice C . j
'* BROWNSVILLE, TEXAS * ••
* *
* *
* ***** ************************
RED RIVER FARM TO EXCHANGE FOR BROWNSVILLE PROPERTY
We have a client who ha s 452 acres of fine land!! four
miles from Avery, Bed River county, to exr hang* for Browne*
ville improved property and farm lands; 250 acres In valley
landThat will produce from one to two b^les of long staple eaMaa. The
farm is fairly well improved, 250 acres in cultivation and five seta of
improvements for tenants. Price $75.00 per acre. Will exchange far
something of equal, or less value and give good terms on differeaea
HALLAM5 COLONIZATION COMPANY, Brownsville Tel.

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