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Brownsville herald. [volume] (Brownsville, Tex.) 1910-current, April 19, 1912, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063730/1912-04-19/ed-1/seq-1/

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£ NEW STYLE CUT GLASS - _ n a __ — — ^ ^ ^ ^ — t„ Ramekin’s Caceroles. Percolator*,
- RR OWNS VII1 F HFRAl n — - j
Br'ville Hardware Co U1\V TT lllJ V II dl ll d 1 lLli\/\Ldiy« Br’ville Hardware Co
VOL. XIX, NO. 204. %$f BROWNSVILLE* TEXAS, FRIDAY, APRIL 19, 1912. PRICE FIVE CENTS.
P 1 A R R
* ■ ERE WHERE PROGRESS MEANS GO.
ERE IN THE RICHEST VALLEY ON EARTH.
ERE WHERE PRICES SUIT THE BUYERS.
* ERE WHERE WE ALL WANT YOU TO COME.
A PLACE TO LIVE THAT IS UNEXCELLED.
PLACE TO DO BUSINESS UNEQUALLED.
PLACE OF OPPORTUNITIES UNSURPASSED.
PLACE WHERE THINGS MOVE UNPARELLED.
RIO GRANDE RIVER SUPPLIES OU R WATER.
lO GRANDE RIVER HAS MADE OUR SOIL.
10 GRANDE VALLEY THE PLACE TO LIVE.
IO GRANDE CAPITOL THE PLACE TO COME.
Remember the best town in the valley.
EMEMBER WHERE WE ARE LOCATED.
EMEMBER HIDALGO, COUNTY, TEXAS.
EMEMBER FOR 30 DAYS LOTS WILL BE CHEAP.
W. E.. Cage
SALES AGENT
*
FORGET YOUR TROUBLES AND COME.
FORGET YOU HAVE EVER DOUBTED. I J
KNOCK AT THE DOOR AND IT WILL OPEN.
SEEK AND YOU WILL FIND US.
BUY WHAT WE OFFER YOU AND YOU * *
WILL ALWAYS BE GLAD.
BUY A HOME AND YOUR WIFE WILL
J •
THINK MORE OF YOU. - *
COME AND CONSULT WITH US AND YOU A
WILL ENJOY YOUR TRIP. /%
COME AND I/X)K FOR YOURSELF AND
YOU WILL BE CONVINCED.
ASK FOR WHAT YOU WANT AND WE ^F^
WILL SHOW YOU WE HAVE IT. II
ASK FOR THE TERMS YOU WISH AND
WE WILL TRY TO ACCOMODATE YOU. ^
P A R
* * ■ r
While In the Valley :
DON'T FAIL TO VISIT !
MISSION.

- • »
Elevation, 14o feet.
I
Irrigation, unexcelled.
Drainage, natural. ;
WE PROVE IT
1 >
, ►
To be the most progressive, high
ly developed, prosperous, thriv
I ing proposition in the Lower Rio 1
| Grande Valley.
I A personal investigation will con
vince you of the greater advan
tages and opportunities offered.
MISSION UNO IMP00VEMEN1 COMPANY; ;
| MISSION. TEXAS I
I JOHN J. CONWAY I
^ President'^* Sole Ovnt ^
Cattle Market.
Associated Press.
Kansas City. Mo., April IS—tat
tle steady to 10 cents low* , export,
steers $7.70 to $K.55. een->
higher; heavies $7.00 to $s.o‘>. Sheep j
10 to 1 r* cents higher.
Cotton Market.
Associated Press.
New Orlaens, La., April 18—Cot
ton futures closed steady at a net ad
vance of i* to 11 points. Sikhs firm
and 1-16 up.

- _._
WOMEN TAKE A HAND IN
GOOD ROADS MOVEMENT
Chicago, 111., April 18—The first
convention of women ever held in
this country for the sole purpose of
promoting the good roads movement,
was attended by over 1,000 dele
gates, representing women's clubs
and organizations throughout Illi
nois. It is the intention of the
leaders to make the Issue a national
movement and plans are now being
perfected to have delegates from
every state in the Union attend the
convention in ID IS.
HOW TH: SHIP FOUHOERED
AWFUL STORY BRI :LY TOII
Suivivers of Titanic Tell Graphic Story of the Wreck
Ship Not Adequately Supplied With Life Saving
Appliances. Ask United States to Lead in Inter
national Movement to Protect Lives.
i----—
Associated Press.
Cunard Pier, New York, April 18.
—The following statement issued by
a committee of the surviving pas
sengers of the Titanic was given to
the press upon the arrival of the
Carpathia at this port.
. "We the undersigned surviving pas
sengers of the steamship Titanic, in
order to forestall any sensational or
exaggerated statements, deem it out
duty to give to the press a statement
of the facts of the accident which
have come to our knowledge and
which we believe to be true.
"Sunday, April 14. about 11:40 p.
m., on a cold starlight night in a
smooth sea and with no moon, the
ship struck an iceberg whi had
been reported to the bridge by the
lookouts, but not early enough to
avoid a collision.
“Steps were taken at once to as
certai nthe damage to the ship and
to save the passengers and the boat.
“Orders were given to put on life
belts and the boats were lowered. The
ship sank about 2:20 a. m. Monday.
The usual distress signals were sent
by wireless, and rockets were fired
at intervals from the ship.
"Fortunately, a wireless message
was received by the Cunard steam
ship Carpathia about midnight, and
she arrived at the scene of the dis
aster about 4 a. m., Monday.
"The officers and crew of the Car
pathia had been preparing all night
for the rescue and comfort of the
survivors. The last mentioneuvvere
received on board with the most
touching care**and kindness.
“Every attention was given to all
irrespective of the class of passen
gers. The poor peasant woman from
the steerage received the aatne care
as did the ladies of the first cabin.
The officers and crew gladly gave up
their staterooms, clothing and com
forts for our benefit.
"The English board of trade pas
senger’s certificate on board the Ti
tanic allowed for a total of approx
imately 3,500 persons to sail with
the ship. The same certificate called
for life boat accommodation for ap
proximately 930 in the following
boats:
Fourteen large life boats, two
smaller boats, four collapsible boats,
life preservers accessible, an appar
ently insufficient number for all on
board.”
The approximate number of pas-j
sengers carried at the time of the
collision was:
First-class, 330.
Second-class, 320.
Third-class, 750.
Total passenger list, 1,400.
Officers and crew, 940.
A total of 2,340 aboard the ship
at the time of the disaster.
Of the foregoing about the follow
ing w^re rescuesd by the Carpafchia:
First-class, 210.
Second-class, 125.
Third-class, 200.
Officers, 4; seamen, 39: stew
ards. 90: firemen 71.
Total saved. 745.
About 80 per cent were saved of the
maximum carrying capacity of the
life boats carried by the Titanic.
Concluding the statement calls at
tention to the inadequacy of the life
saving appliances on board modern
steamers, and the necessity for
remedial steps. The English board of
trade allowed entirely too many peo
ple to each boat to permit them to
be properly handled in case of an ac
cident, the statement says.
The lack of trained seamen to
man the life boats and not enougfi
officers to carry out the emergency
order? on the bridge, to supervise
and control the life boats, and the
absence of searchlights, and other
faults were noted in the statement.
An international conference to
recommend the enactment of identi
cal laws providing for the safety of
all at sea is urged. The United
States is asked to ake the initiative
in the matter.
»*- ~
f
Associated Pres«.
New York./April 18—How th«
passenger steamship afloat sank off
the bank of New F'oundland Monday,
carving to death 1,601 of 2,304 per
sons aboard, was told to the world
in awful details for the first time
•tonight with the arrival in New York
of the Cunard liner Carpathia bear
ing the exhausted survivors.
Of the great facts that stand out
from the account of the tragedy
the are the most salient:
Salient Facts.
The death list has been increased
rather than decreased.
Six persons died after being
rescued.
The list of prominent persons lost
stands as previously reported.
Practically every woman and
child, except those who refused to
leave their husbands were saved.
While the Band Played.
The survivors in the life boats
(saw the lights on the stricken ves
sel glimmer to the last, heard the
hand playing and saw the doomed
; hundreds on her decks and heard
'their groans and crie9 when the
vessel sank. Accounts vary as to
whether there was disorder aboard.
Not only was the Titanic tearing
through the night to her doom with
every ounce of steam crowded on,
but she was under orders from the
general offices of the line to make
all the speed of which she was cap
able. This statement was made to
night by J. H. Moody, a quartermas
ter of the vessel. The helsman on
duty on the night of the disaster,
!said she was making 21 knots and
I the officers strove to live up to the
orders and smash the record.
“It was close to midnight,’’ said
Moody, “and I was on the bridge with
i the second officer, who was in com
! mand. Suddenly he shouted ‘Port
your helm.’ I did so but it was too
late. We struck the submerged por
tion of the berg.”
Captain Grade's Story
Associated Press.
New York, April 18—Col. Archi
bald Gracie, U. S. A., the last man
: saved on the Titanic went down with
■ the vessel but was picked up. He
j told a remarkable story of personal
• hardship and denied emphatically the
, report that there was any panic
■ aboard.
He praised in the highest terms
the behaviour of both, passengers
■ and crew, and paid a high tribute
• to the heroism of the women passen
i gers.
Mrs. Isador Strauss, he said, went
to her death because she would not
desert her husband. Although he
pleaded with her to take a, place in
tlie life boat, she steadfastly refused
and when the ship settled by the
head the two were engulfed by the
waves.
Graice told how he was driven to
the top mos' deck when the ship set
tled and was the sole survivor after
the wave that swept her just before
|the final plunge was taken.
Swept From the Deck
“I jumped with the wave just as
I often have jumped with the break
ers at the seashore,” he said. “By
great good fortune I managed to
grasp to the brass railing on the
;deck above and hung on by might
iand main. When the ahlp plunged
down 1 was forced to let go and 1
swirled about and around for what
seemed an interminable time. Event
ually I came to the surface to find
the sea a mas sof wreckage.
I “Luckily I was unhurt, and east
' ing about managed to seize a wood
en grating floating nearby. When
I r(covered my breath I discovered
a large canvass and cork life raft
which floated up. A man whose
name I did not learn, was struggling
toward it. 1 cast off and helped him
» to get onto *he raft. We then be
gan to rescuing the people flounder
ing in the sea.
The Life Raft.
i “When dawn broke there were
thirty yof us ou the raft, standing
knee deep in icy water and afraid to
I move lest the cranky craft be over
turned. Several unfortunates, be
t1 numbed and half dead made an ef
1
fort to reach us, but we hail to warn
them away. Had we made an effort
to save them we all might have per
ished.
“Hours elepased before ' we were
picked uu by the Carpi7*ila. They
were the longest and most terrible
1 ever spent. Practically without
any sensation or feeling because of
the icy water, we were almost drop
ping from fatigue. One man became
hysterical under the strain. The
rest of us were near the breaking
point.”
Gracie denied that any man was
fired upon. Only once was a revol
ver fired and this was to intimidate
some steerage passengers who tum
bled into a boat before it was pre
pared for launching. The revolver
was fired into the air.
Gracie praised the conduct of
John Jacob Astor.
Astor's Courage.
“The millionaire devoted all his
energies toward saving his bride,
who was in a delicate condition,”
said Gracie. “Astor helped us in
our efforts to get her in the boat. 1
lifted her into the boat and astor re
ques’ed permission to accompany her
for her own protection. ‘No, sir,’
replied the officer, ‘no man shall go
until the women are off.' Astor then
turned to clearing the other boats
and reassuring the women.
Gracie said that despite the warn
ings of icebergs there was no slow
ing down of speed ordered by the
commander of the Titanic. In the
24 hours ending the 14th, the ship
was run f>46 miles.
M.‘ 'I
Newspaper Man’s Story.
Associated Press.
New York. April 18—How the Ti
tanic sank was told by Charles F.
Hurd, a staff correspondent of the
Evening World, who was a passen
ger on the Carpathia tonight, and
furnished that paper with his ac
count.
He gives the number of lives lost
as 1,700. He praises highly the
courage of the crew, hundreds of
whom gave their lives “with a heroism
which was equalled hut could not be
exceeded, his account says, by that
of John Jacob Astor, Henry B. Har
ris, Jaques Furtrelie and others in
the long list of first cabin passen
gers.
It wa sthe explosion of the boilers,
according to Hurd's account, which
finally finished the Titanic’s career.
The bulkhead system, though prob
ably working, prevailed only to delay
the ship’s sinking. The position of
the ship's wound on the starboard
quarter admitted the icy water,
which caused the boilers to explode
and these explosions broke the ship
in two.
‘ Nearer My God To Thee.”
“The ship's string band gathered
i nthe saloon,” near the end of hjs
narrative he says, “and played us
Nearer My God To Thee.” The ac
count continues:
“The crash against the iceberg,
which was sighted at only a quarter
of a mile distant, came almost sim
ultaneously with the click of the
levers operated at the bridge which
stopped the engines and closed the
water tigh* doors.
“Captain Smith was on the bridge
and a moment later commanded all
on boar dto put on life preserver?,
and ordered the life boats to be low
ered. The first boats had more male
passengers as ’be men were the first
to reach the deck, when the rush o'
frightened men and women and cry
ing children to the decks began.
Captain Remained at Poit.
“Women first, was the riile rigid
ly enforced. Officers drew their re
volvers, but in most cases there was
no jtse for them. Revolver shots
heard shortly before the Titanir
went down, caused many rumors;
one that Cap|. Smith ha 1 shot him
self; another hat the first officer
Murdock, ended his Mfe. But mem
bers of the crew discredited thew
rumors. Smith was last seen on tb<
bridge, just before the ship sank
leapining only after :he decks wer
washed away.
“What became of ‘the men witl
the life preservers, was the questioi
asked by many. Many of those witl
life preservers were seen to go down
despite the preservers, and deat
bodies floated on the surface, as th»
boats moved away.
Refused to Leave Her Husband
Mrs. Isadore Strauss refused tc
leave her husband's side and both
perished together.”
Harold Cotfan, the Marconi opera
tor o fthe Carpathia, did not go to
bed at his usual time Sunday night,
and as a result caught the first mes
sage of the Titanic’s plight, which
fact is responsible for the saving of
the rescued.
District Court Notes.
Yesterday morning the case of M.
Wagner et al., versus the San Benito
Land and Water company, a suit
for damages, in which Messrs. Jones,
West & West and R. J. McMillan
represented the plaintiffs and Messrs
bpears, Battz and Morrison the de
fendants, was dismissed was dis
missed owing to the parties in the
suit announcing to the court that
settlement had been made.
The grand jury came into the
court yesterday morning and an
nounced that they could not find suf
ficient evidence to indict in the case3
of the State of Texas versus Luis
Manguia, charged with arson, Ar
turo Cuellar Blanca, charged with
arson, and Andres Garcia, charged
with burglary.
In the first two cases, the defend
ants were charged some months ago
before Justice of the Peace Oavito
with attempting'to burn the house
of Cuellar's aunt.
: HOUSE IN FAVOR
OF PARCELS POST
WILL ALLOW FIFTEEN HOURS
FOR DISCUSSION.

Also Favor Law to Require News
papers to Publish Names of Edi
tor. Editorial Writers and Stock
holders—Deciding Vote Soon.
Associated Press.
Washington, D. C., April 18—The
house went on record today as fav
oring the establishment of a parcel*
post system and postal express. A
commission to gather information
relative to its creation 19 in con
templation.
It also went on record in favor of
the Barnhart propostion to make
newspapers publish the names of
I editors, editorial writers and stock
holders.
Votes were taken on these prpost
tions as contained in a rule which
will bring them up during the con
sideration of the appropriation bill,
and resulted overwhelmingly In
favor of immediate consideration.
After a fifteen hours' debate, be
ginning tomorrow, the deciding vote
will be taken on the proposal for
parcels post and postal express.
Freight Receipts.
9
The freight receipts yesterday
were: One car of wood, one of box
material, two of milk, two of sugar,
one of mules, one of cement, one of
lumber, one of sand, one of gravel,
five of wood blocks, one of sugar and
three of crushed stone and one of
barrels.
. /
] BIGGEST REALTY SNAP IN THE VALLEY j
{ 344 Acres of Land on the Big T
Mercedes Canal at X
| $55.00 Per Acre f {
\ Land has full Water Rights, Canals and \
-1' Ditches made to each Tract. 246 acres T
•*f lies within one mile of proposed interur- J
<y ban road, surrounding lands held at A
X $125 to $150 per acre, will not sub
X divide at this price, part of purchase T
1V price may remain. . #
X Address the owner,'
■ W. Lingenbrink, |
X Mercedes, Texas. ^
—----w-•----—....... ■ .■ " " - ".jumm
************************ ***** •
* •
* 1 he weather changes, and the cost j
% of living, like tariff revision is *
* upward, but the price of ICE re- ;
* mains the same. t
. 9C
*
i Peoples Ice Co. \
l BROWNSVILLE, TEXAS *
* *
* m
* ***** ************************
RED RIVER FARM TO EXCHANGE FOR BROWNSVILLE PROPERTY
We have a client who ha s 452 acres of fine landfl four
miles from Avery, Red River county, to exchange for Brown*
ville improved property and farm lands; 250 acres in valley
lamT’that will produce from one to two bales of long staple cotton. Tfco
farm Is fairly well improved, 250 acres in cultivation and five seta of
, improvements flu* tenants. Price $75.00 per acre. Will exchange for
something of eodal, or less value and give good terms on dlfferanag.
HALLAM; COLONIZATION COMPANY, Browuvlllc T
)

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