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Brownsville herald. [volume] (Brownsville, Tex.) 1910-current, July 15, 1912, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063730/1912-07-15/ed-1/seq-1/

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RROWNWII I F HFRAl H "nsm
BROWNSVILLE HARDWARE CO Ui\.V^ W 1 ^ V ■” At J, J. JL X/jL 1—J JL^« BROWNSVILLE HARDWARE CO
' MONDAY. JULY 15. 1912 ■ • PRICE FIVE CENTS.
YOU HAVE LOOKED, I
I YOU HAVE SEEN !
If
j Now Then Move I
I; Where To? |
Ipharr
The Eureka of the Valley I
WANTS I
Men with energy
Men with brain and money
Men willing to make things go
Men with character and intellect
Men that are not “Has beens”
Not “Going to be”, but “Is’ns” and “ares”
FOR SUCH AS THAT
The Latchftring is on the outside
Buy you a home with what you save in
doctor bills
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Terms are such, that you will not
know you are buying
W. E. CAGE,
< ■ ♦
Sales Agent.
Lb-=u
- ■ - Ml— ■■■■■■ ■■ _
'. *
mififir-^r—
; While In the Valley :
DON’T FAIL TO VISIT
MISSION.
»
I
Elevation, 1 4 o feet.
Irrigation, unexcelled.
Drainage, natural.
1 WE PROVE IT
To be the most progressive, high
ly developed, prosperous, thriv- 1
i
ing proposition in the Lower Rio
>
Grande Valley. >
A personal investigation will con- ’
vince you of the greater advan
tages and opportunities offered. '
I MISSION UNO IMPROVEMENT GOMPANYS :
MISSION, TEXAS !
JOHN J. CONWAY
President V Sole Ow.*>er
■ . ~ ~
WEATHER.
Meterological report for the 21
hours ending at 7 p. m. July 11.
Barometer at 7 a. m... . . .SO.
Barometer at 7 p m. .29.9''
Temperature at 7 a m. .<9.2
Temperature at 7 p. m. .*s N
Maximum temperature .91.2
Minimum temperature .7t5.,7
FORECAST.
Associated Press.
Washington, July 1 » East Tex
as fair Monday; a bo were aud some
.- ■"
what cooler at night or Tuesday i:i
the northern portion: fair in teh
the northern portion: fair in the
ers Monday in the west and Monday
or Monday night in the northern i>or
tion; fair in the southeast portion:
Cooler bv Monday night.
j __
. The wise mother screens tb'* ba
b\ s cradle, ami wears a smilA; the
- V
Some men can resist anything iii
the world but temptation,
t
THE GARDENERS
ASSEMBLE TODAY
ACTUAL WORK WILL BEGIN THIS
; AFTERNOON.
Morning Program Delayed Account
of Trains—Secretary Water* Call*
Attention to Certain Features of
Special Interest on the Program.
As announced previously, the
South Texas Gardeners will open
;their annual meeting today at th~
hospital building in old Fort Brown.
„ Owing to the delay in arrival of
members, it is not expected that the
association will be able to begin ac
tual work before the after noon ses
sion. However, the members will
meet this morning and probably d"
eonsiderabe preliminary work. The
address of welcomp by Mayor Cole is
expected to be delivered at the open
ing of the afternoon session.
This information is obtained from
: Lindsay,Waters, the secretary of the
association, who arrived in the city
Saturday.
Mr. Waters states that the program
for this meeting comprises many ex
cellent features.
Particular attention, he said,
should be paid by delegates to the
address of Hon. Sam H. Dixon, for
me.rly secretary of the state depart
ment of agriculture, on “Civic Im
provement as Arnlied fo Farm Homes
and Roads,” which will be first on
the program after luncheon today. .
He also calls especial attention to
the address of Stanley Watson on
“Ideas for Beginners.” after dinner ;
Monday evening, and to those of C. {
W. Simpson on “FCxpress, Packing
and Shipping,” and C. X. Campbell
on “Relations of Express Company j
and Truck Grower."
For tlie information of strangers
it should he stated that the meet
ings. are to be held in the west wing
of the former hospital building in
Fort Brown. The entrance to the fort
is located at the foot of of Elizabeth
street. All who are .Interested in
the work of the association are wel
come to attend the meetings.
Mr. Waters anticipates a large at-;'
tendance at the meeting. The far
mers of this section are generally 1
'at leisure just now and the railroad
has aDo made an unusually low rate
—the lowest, in fact, that has been
offered for any meeting of the Gar
deners. The tickets are issued for a
loncer period than usual also, being
good from Saturday until Wednes
day.
_ 1
THIRTEEN KILLED i
FIFTEEN WERE HURT
WHEN BURLINGTON TRAINS COL
LIDE NEAR CHICAGO

Train Running at Full Speed Through (
Fog Chashe* Into Train Ahead. ]
Telescoping Two Sleeping Cars.
Fire Started But Was Extinguished '
- (
Associated Press.
Chicago, July 14.—Thirteen i>er- ■
,.sons were killed and fifteen hurt in
|a wreck on the Chicago, Burlington
& Quincy railroad at Western <
Springs, a suburb of (’hicago today. fi
Train No. 8, crashed into the rear
of train No. 2, telescoping two sleep- ,
ling cars. No. 8. was supposed to have
jclear trackc and was running through
a fog at full speed. No. 2 known as
the Overland Express from Denver
was standing still on the track.
Mrs. F. A. Wilcox( who was in (
charge of the tower from which the
block signals wore controlled, said
I she was certain the block was thrown
against both trains. She collapsed af
j ter the wreck and is still in a highly
nervous condition. The railroad offi
cials ref rise to fix the blame until the
accident has been fully investigated.
AU the dead except one were ta
ken from the rear coach of the Den
ver train.
Engine No. 8, ploughed through
this ur. halving it and crushing out
the lives of many helpless passen
gers. many of whom were rtlll in •
their berths. A fire started from th
g s lights, but was put out with line
of hose.
Cloudburt at Denver
Denver. July 1 4.—More than a mil
lion dollars of damamge war done,
and tPo life is knowm to hne been
lost as a resit of » cloudburst here
(.tonight Cherry creek, which extends
niNl'f. the lo-ih* tst. we!if and soJ'h
boundaries of Denver. overflowed and
l approximately four square miles are
V. “
4
Frank Rabb, Woodrow Wilson chairman ior the 15th congressional
district, who was the delegate from the district in the Balt'more con
vention.
FRANK BABB IS
ENTHUSIASTIC GREETING TO
WIISON DELEGATE.
Music* Parade and Impromptu Recep
tion on Arrival of Train—Dinner
Given by Wilson Club at Milder
Hotel in Evening.
Frank Rabb has returned. Browns
ille's delegate, one of the determined
kVoodrow Wilson forty, who went to
Baltimore with a single purpose and
'ante back to Texas with a full knowl
edge that they had accomplished that
>urpose, was given the glad hand
Saturday by his many friends.
At a rough estimate 200 people
■rowded around Mr. Rabb as he step
ted off the train at the Brownsville
lepot and many good right hand«
vere extended in the attempt to
neet that of Mr. Rabb. Only a small
>ortion succeeded in reaching him,
lowever, and the reception commit
ec, composed of members of the
Woodrow Wilson Club and others,
lustled the honored guest off to wait
ing automobiles to escort him to
lis home.
While the hand played national
iirs, the crowd followed the rerep
ion committee and Mr. Rabb up the
Matform to Levee street where two
lutomobiles. one completly covered
vith United States flags, and three
lacks were waiting.
The line of march was up Twelfth
street to Washington, thenre out
Washington to Ninth street, thence
lown Ninth to Elizabeth and out the
atter street to Mr. Rahb’s home.
After Mr. Rabb had greeter his
amilv and a number of waiting la
lios, an impromptu reception was
leld, and refreshments and cigars
vere served. Much conversation was
hen indulged in concerning Balti
nore. New York, lost pocketbo'ks
■ontaining railroad tickets, anti other
opics too numerous to mention.
It was then decided that photo
graphs of the assembled friends
vould make desirable souvenirs of
he occasion and Photographer Holm
vas sent for. Several positions were
aken. Mr. Rabb then made a bee
ine for the center of a motley crowd
>f boys and men hanging on the
fence, and a photograph was taken
vith him as the eenter of the group.
The reception was finally adjourn
'd. after an invitation had been ten
lered Mr Rabb by the committee to
Le the honor guest of the Wilson
Hub at dinner at the Miller hotel
Saturday evening.
The Dinner.
Twenty-three were seated at the
dinner served in honor of Mr. Robb
at the Miller hotel Saturday even
ing.
The dining room at the Miller w as
beantifully dec< rated with flags, fes
toons. flowers and pictures. One of
the features of the decorations was
the flag of the Pennsylvania dele
gation to the convention. This was
a large black, velvet flag, approxi
mately 9x5 feet, having on it two
rearing dragons, underlined with the
words “Virtue. Liberty, Independ
ent e." There were also photograph"!
of Wilson, and numerous photo
graphs of the Fourth Regiment Ar
mory. where tbe convention was h >M
both interior and etaerior. The ban
ners “Win Witft Wilson,” the al
ready famous alliteration, were also
in evidence.
Col. Gay, the toast master, and who
is chairman of the Woodrow Wilson
<‘lab. opening the proceedings, said
in part:
“Something 1. .e six monthr. ago I
met Frank Rabb on the street, and
while in conversation with him, he
suggested the organization of a
Woodrow Wilson Club. I laughed the
matter off. and heard nothing of
it for a long while. I^ater I again met
Mr. Rabb and he asked that 1 do
him a favor accept the chairman
snip of a Woodrow Wilson Club.
“The town* was opposed to Wilson,
but we organized with 2."> or 30 mem
bers and I was elected chairman.
The club had no speakers, and had to
stagger along as best it could with
out them. It was a thoroughly demo
cratic organization, and 1 believe that
Woodrow Wilson, William Jennings
Bryan or any other good democrat
would have apnroved its member
ship There were no professional pol
iticians and no office seekers. The
membership supported Woodrow Wil
son because they believed in him as
a man, as a good, high-minded citi
zen of the United States who did
[not want to be a ‘‘boss’.’’
Col. Gay ‘hen read from an edi
torial which appeared in an Okla
\
homa paper, saying among other
things, that ‘‘Woodrow Wilson has
iwon his way into the hearts of the
'American people because he is nei
ther a political boss himself nor be
holden to a mother’s son among
them. All of his successes, all of
his achievements, have been won in
spite of political bosses and favor
seekers.”
Mr. Rabb was then called upon
and spoke in part as follows:
“I met all me big bosses, includ
ing Murphy, Sullivan, Ryan and Bel
mont. While around I found out a
lot of things concerning them. I once
found Murphy and his bunch in a
very nervous condition. They wanted
to quit and were told that New Jer
sey, Minnesota, Pennsylvania and
Texas would stay until snow fell
if it would do Wilson any good.
“The Missouri delegation was ang
ered because Bryan changed his vote
to Wilson, and the Nebraska dele
gation sided with Missouri. It ap
peared for a while as if there would
he a riot, but things quieted down,
and a Texas delegate shouted to Bry
an an invitation to come and sit
with them if Nebraska did not care
for him. Mr. Bryan smiled his ap
preciation of the invitation.'
He said he was one of a party that
called on Governor Wilson at his
summer home at Seagirt, N. J. Mr.
Rabb presented the democratic nom
inee for president with a silk Texas
flag. Photographs were taken of Mr.
Wilson and the Texas delegation,
and Mr. Rabb said that if Browns
ville gets one it will he framed. He
also exacted a promise from Mr. WH
F-on that if the latter ever comes to
Texas, he will visit this city.
1 Mr Rabb ended with the observa
tion that no one could say that Wil
liam Jennings Bryan is a coward.
M J Slattery, who was made al
ternate delegate from this district
and was seated in the convention,
when Mr Rabb was seated as the
delegate, was then called upon, and
>aid:
“The convention was the grandest
political spectacle I had ever seen or
ever hope to see. and 1 can never for
get Bryan's plea to the people not
(Continued on Page 2.*
SAN BENITO
THE
BIG CANAL T< »WN
The ltvesc and largest new town in lc^as in the
LOWER RIO GRANDE VALLEY
San Benito has grown from nothin? to over four thou and population in
four years and today offers best location for com men i;«l and In
dustrial nterprioes in Southwest Texas. Natural advantage*
and improvements already made injure city cf Importance.
The growth and development have only started.
NEARLY HALF A MILLION
Hollars railrt; d business on St. T^ouis, Brownsville and Mexico Railway
at San Benito, in one year. Sixty-seven 1 er cent iu« rcase ove: bo sine -
of previous yea.*.
Year ending April 30th 1911 1912
Freight received 112.S19.4I 235,880.20
Freight forwarded 42,839.33 98,100.31
Express received 12,539.64 15.426.23
Express forwarded 18,098.5 4 19,025.44
Ticket sales 31,4 69.95 43.960 66
Excess Baggage 292.25 478.70
Switching, storage, and
demurrage No record 3,20 4.1 1
Total Value of Business 248,050.95 414,075.65
Above represents only the amount paid to the St. L. B. & M. for hand
ling business shown and NOT THE VALUE* OF PRODUCTS HANDLED.
EIGHTY THOUSAND ACRES OF RICH DELTA SOIL
irrigated from the big San Benito Canal surround the town of San Be
nito. Twenty-five thousand acres already in cultivation.
INTERURBAN RAILROAD NOW IN OPERATION
over 40,000 acres of this tract serving every farm with convenient
freight and express service. Extension being made on the balance of
the trac t. Rio Hondo. Santa Maria, Carricltos, Eos Indies and Ha Palom.c
on intcrurban road out of San Benito. Convenient schedule.
IT WILL PAY YOU TO INVESTIGATE SAN BENITO
before engaging in farming, commercial or industrial enterprises else
where in Texas.
SAN BENITO LAND & WATER COMPANY.
SIN BENITO. TEXAS.
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PEOPLE'S ICE AND MANUFACTURING CD.
Starting business in March. 1905, the price of ice was fixed at
30 cents a hundred pounds at the plant, 40 cents per hundred
pounds delivered, and the price has never been changed. This is a
record of which we are proud. Ice is sold lower in Brownsville
than in any other city in Texas of its size. All ice is made from
pure distilled water and is clean and wholesome.
Any amount delivered at any place in the city,
The company appreciates your business and support and will
continue its present policy of accommodation. Buy an ice book
and save 5 per cent—if is safe, as it is not transferable
S. C. TUCKER, MANAGER
\
* * I t f t • * ^Jt-' Jl Jt J> ^ c
•»* *i" V j* T "»* V ’i* “«* “• ‘ *i* '»* *■»“* »* |
* *
*:* OUSTED SENATOR
WILL GO HOME *
i;. -
+ Associated Press.
Washington, July 14.—Wil
*!- 11am I»rlmer is going bark to -J*
*:• Chicago and is going to work, -i
v was the brief announcement v
made today in behalf of the man
w whom the senate yesterday strift- v
S- ped his office as junior sena- +
tor from Illinois. Whether he -J
will enter politics and seek a Je
%- vindication at the hands of the v
v legislature Mr. Ixjrimer has not v
-r decided, his friends say. He was v
-I- out automobiling today. -I
* *
*:• *;•
Garibaldi to Vi*it Madero.
Associated Press. ^
San Antonio, July 14.—General'
Guiseppe Garibaldi, who resigned his
command after a dispute with Gen
eral Sanjines arrived here, and will
proceed to Mexico City tomorrow to1
see Madero. It is inferred that he ex
pects to resume the command of his
gade.
Rebels Worsted.
Associated Press.
Mexico City. July 14 - Mail ad
vices received here tell of an engage
ment between the insurrectos and the
federal* near Argumendo the 4 nth
of\ July, In which the rebels were
worsted having lost many killed and
wounded.
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• m m* m m^ m • mm - • • • • • • ^ « ■»* * •.*■• * -
.1. • r» « « r » *• i 4. t i .• *
>f/ **#
WILSON SEEKS
* NEEDED REST >
■t * a •*
-I- Assciated Press. %
■I- Seagirt, N. J.. July 14.—Gov-*
;* ernor Wilson left tor his summer '
v home today for twenty-four
•I* hours rest. His immediate fam
v Hy and the newspaper report- •
-I- ers were told where he was go- •'
v ing but no other persons were
v Informed. tJovernor Wilson a.-k- v
v ed the newspaper men not to
v disturb him unless It was in
-I- deed an important matter.
•|c K (l
J.' 9- ♦/ 9/ 9' 9' • It/ • t£ J. J/ *' * » • •
V V V \* V *.* ■ • • V V
Truck Growers Meet.
The Brownsville Truck Grower
Association had a regular basin'
session Saturday. Judge A. W. Otn
ningham, of Harlingen, preslden* >'
the Rio Grande & Coast Aas-»ciati »
happened to be in the city and x»i
asked to meet with them.
Federal" Buy Airihips.
Associated Press.
Torreon, Me*., July 14.- Two **>
ships for the use- of the Meilcan *
my have arrived here and are to !>*
tried out tomorrow
Handled Thirteen Hundred fa
The Rio Grande tk Coast Asm* * •
tion of Harlingen this year had d
about non car* of truck. The a— -
iafion is said to be In a very flour
ishing condition financially.

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