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Brownsville herald. [volume] (Brownsville, Tex.) 1910-current, July 16, 1912, Image 1

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COTTON PICKER'S SACKS
COTTON PICKER'S SACKS See V, For Prico.
i>rftS™Jl,0,Tr.?0"e7'* Wor,h M. BROWNSVILLE HARDWARE CO
BROWNSVILLE HARDWARE CO •
. . .. ? ^ .... .
VOL. XIX. NO. 278. BROWNSVILLE- TEXAS, TUESLAY, JULY 16. 1312. pRICE FIVE C i‘NTS
YOU HAVE LOOKED, I
YOU HAVE SEEN ,
P
Now Then Move
Where To?
PHARR
I
The Eureka of the Valley $
WANTS
Men with energy i
Men with brain and money !
Men willing to make tilings go
Men with character and intellect i
Men that are not “Has beens”
Not “Going to be”, but “Is’ns” and “ares”
II
FOR SUCH AS THAT j
The Latchftring is on the outside [I
Buy you a home with what you save in
doctor bills r ’
Ilerms are such, that you will not
know you are buying
| W. E. CAGE,
j Sales Agent.
, : - ■■■■ ! — ■' gg—
While In the Valley j
. .}’ »
DON’T FAIL TO VISIT
MISSION.
I I

Elevation, 14o feet. !
i »
Irrigation, unexcelled.
Drainage, natural.
WE PROVE IT i
j :
To be the most progressive, high- |
ly developed, prosperous, thriv- ’
ing proposition in the Lower Rio
r Grande Valley.
A personal investigation will con
vince you of the greater advan
tages and opportunities offered.
“ W
: MISSION UNO IMPROVEMENT I
>
MISSION, TEXAS 1
JOHN J. CONWAY I
' President & Sole Owner ■
ifWi^^irrrrrn---, ft
RAILROAD MEN
MEET ENGINEERS
Representatives of Fifty Railroads
and Their Engineers Meet to Set
tle Wage* and Woifking Condi
tions.
Washington, July IV Il«M»resen
tativea of fifty railroads east of Chi
cago and north of the Ohio river met
the official heads of their locomotive
engineers union before the arbitra
tion committee headed bv former sec
retary of commerce and labor,
Strauss, in an endeavor to settle a
dispute over wages and working con
ditions.
Warren S Stone, president of tlu
required of them, warranted the de
mand:;.
SOUTH JEMS GARDENERS
HOLD THEIR ANNUAL BEET
YESTERDAY S PROGRAM REPLETE WITH INTEREST, MEETING
CONCLUDES TODAY. HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY THIS
THIS AFTERNOON. CANE GROWERS THIS EVENING
The South Texas Gardeners open
ed their sixth annual meeting yeg
|terda> afternoon at one o’clock with
jabout 12" people present including a
number of ladies, and deep interest
I was shown in the proceedings. The
afternoon was given over to talks
and discussion covering matters of
interest to growers of truck in both
the irrigated and dry farming ;ee
jtions of the Lower Rio Grande Val
ley. Last night the afternoon pro
gram was continued and the dele
gates were entertained with a smo
ker by the Chamber of Commerce.
J H. Arbenz. first vi e president
of the association, presided in the
absence at President E. C. Green,
who is now located at Washington.
D. CL, and could not attend the meet
ing.
culture. The farm home must be made
is attractive as possible that the
oy may be enticed to stay on the
atm .He drew a mir.d picture of a
iw-.e on a farm that liad been made
pleasant, and said that the farmer
lad no right whatever to allow his
ity neighbor to surpass him in the
>eauty of his home. In his opinion,
here is no recreation e'iual to deep
hinking about your business, and
ie advised his hearers to tell their
nisi rises to the wife the boy or the
rirl, and interest them in his affairs.
lie believed that people who have .
lie development of tats country in
heir rhrage should build homes that
>vi 11 cause them pride—cause them
0 invite their neighbors in and
ay to them “This :s my home.” Kn
rironment, tie said, develops charac
er as much as doe sanything in
he world. Ho had tak»*n a trip Sun
lay through the city and seen enough
dimbbery to supply every home in
ho valley.
In closing he switched his topic
opic to orange raising in this sec
ion, and gave much advice to those
^resent in the use of smudge pots
luring freezing weather .He said that
mange growing in this country is
ust as safe as. any other industry.
Tells of Alfalfa.
Judge A. \V. Cunninfhum read
1 paper on “Alfalfa,” which in part
vas as follows:
“That alfalfa can up successfully
trown on all well drained land in i
he lower Rio Grande Valley has
teen so thoroughly demonstrated as
0 remove all doubt. In sofno places
t has failed, but numerous reasons
tave entered into and nntrihnted to
he failure, none of which were of a
hmdamental nature, so far as the
coil and climate generally are con
'erned. The most famous alfalfa
growing regions covering as large a
:erritory as this valley, will discover
many thousands of acres where al
falfa will not do so well, and that
is true here.
“But generally speaking, this val
ley has a soil suitable for growing
alfalfa, and climatic conditions fa
vorable to curing the hay. Nearly
four years experience in grow tig
alfalfa here has brought the convic
liction that every farmer should be
growing and selling alfalfa.’’
Judge Cunningham adde 1 t la at four
rears ago he traveled ove>- the 'al
ley and in two months time he found
>nlv two alfalfa fields. Since that
time a great deal of alfalfa lias been
grown. He exhibited stalks of alfal
fa from his field of 10 acres, on which
tie said alfalfa had been growing .»!>
months. He said the proper time to
plant alfalfa was between December
1 and March t.
Money in Lettuce.
Joe Scott of San Benito handle#
the subject “Lettuce”. He said that
raising this vegetable is a very plain
and simple matter. Enough lettuce,
could be raised on 20 ac res of gr nnd
to make all present millionaires, if
any one could be found to market
it. He cited an example of two John
son county boys who came down into
the valley with no experience. They
began raising lettuce and in one
year, he said, they cleared $64 00.
Mr. Scott said he did not believe
in intense rotation of crops, but that
he was satisfied in making one crop
a year. He laid considerable stress
on the trouble encountered in mar
keting a crop of lettuce this l>eing
the greatest drawback in raising the
vegetable. In his opinion, the Big
Boston lettuce Is best suited for this
country.
Dynamite Not Favored.
The subject of “Dynamite” was
handled carefully bv \V. B. Xewhall
of Raymoudville. Mr Xewhall has gi
ven considerable of his time in ex
perimenting with dynamite for the
farm, but does not believe that it
will prove successful in this coun
try. lie said that where the prit e
of labor was ton high, dynamite
might be used much more cheaply,
but that with cheap labor it was
better to do without it. He said that
powder manufacturers claim that dy
namite is good In sub-soiling in dry
soil, but that it would not do in
wet soil.
Improvement in Corn.
On the subject of “Corn,” J H.
(Continued on Page 6.1
'
The Mayor s Address.
The address of welcome in behalf
of the citizens of Brownsville was
delivered by Mayor A. B. Pole. He
said that it gave him great plois-re
both as an officer at d as a citizen
to welcome the delegates to the r: y
and assured them that every tonnes
j would be extended to make their
visit pleasant.
Mr. Cole said that ho was horn and
r ared on a farm in Cherokee coun
ty, and has a thorough knowledge,
of the game of farming. He said that 1
on ’lie tillers of thp soil absolutely
depended the welfare of the coun
try, and that the towns do not pro
duce. hut serve as a market for what
the farmer produces.
Secretary Water's Replie\
In behalf of the association, Lind
say Waters of Harlingen, secretary of
the Gardeners, responded to the may
or's welcome.
He said that this was the Sixth
convention of the Gardeners, all held
in this city, and they had always
been assured a welcome and received
it. The interest of the city and gar
! doner are cohesive, he said, and no
country could go ahead without a
spirit of coheslveness being adopted
by the town and the country,
j Continuing he cited as an example
of co-operation in the towns and cit
ies, the chambers of commerce and
similiar organizations, and laid stress
upon the fait that eohesiveness be
tween the grower anu consumer must
be obtained.
Closing, Mr. Waters thanked the
mayor and said he was sure the d de
| gates would leave with the same
happy feeling they had brought with
them.
The presiding officer then named !
the committees, and they were in- 1
st rue ted to make their reports by
noon today. The committees arc. on1
j membership, J. W. Brady, A. X. Tan
dy and T. Y. McGovern: on resolu
tions, \\\ C. Gridin, D. B. Stevens
and A. R. Sprague; on auditing. 1>. R. .
I (lay, J. Bowyer and O. W. Banks.
Sam H. Dixon Talks.
{ Sam H. Dixon of Houston, editor of
Farm and Fireside and former sec
retary of the Agriculture, was the
first speaker on the program, and 1
his topic was “Civic improvement as 1
1 Applied to Farm Homes and Road1 1
Mr. Dixon referred to sections where
agriculture had advanced rapidly and 1
! where horticulture has been estab
lished for years He sam he re og
nized hte necessity of beauty in the
I homes ai d beautifying of homes, ano
said the farmers spend much money
| on t hoir uomes, hut forget the Idle
pleasures for the wife and children
by neglecting shade trees, flowers,
and the other things that go to make
farm life pleasant.
) He spoke of the great necessity
of making the farm home attra< tiv.
to boys and girls so they would stay
on the farm . but said he did not
believe in keeping them from the
cities "entirely, lie said the cities
could not do without the farm
raised hoy, as from that source came
0 the greatt st men in all lines. To
" keei the farm boy from the city
■ would mean to cripple the industrial
* world.
:i Mr Dixon called attention to the
■ fact that two of the greatest rail
road builders in he country were
e country raised boys. One of them thv
*’ president of the Southern Pacific rail
road was raised on a little farm for
ty miles from Houston.
l\ Mr. Dixon said further that the
- alme has arrived when farmers re
alize that it takes brains in avri
COMMITTEE UNANIMOUSLY RAT
IFIES CANDIDATE'S CHOICE.
*
Chairman Empoweied to Select Nine
Members to Take Active Charge of
Campaign. Headquarters Probably j
in New York.
I
Associated Press.
Chit ago. July 1 .- William F. Mc
Ccmbs, or New York, tin- choice of
Governor Wilson, was elected Chair
man today of the demot ratio nation
al committee, and empowered to ap
point a committee of not fewer than
nine members to take active charge
of the democratic campaign.
He was also authorized to select
a national treasurer and such other
officers as he sees lit, including pos
sibly a vice < nairman and after con
sulting with Wilson, select tnc head
quarters.
The headquarters will possibly be
New York.
Joseph E. Davies of Madison, Wis
consin, was elected secretary of the
committee. John i. Martin was re
elected sergeant-at-arms.
Mr. McCombs was elected unan
imously. Plans for raising campaign
lur.ds will be discussed at the after
noon session and tonight.
Retiring Chairman Mack suggest
ed that appeals be published in the
newspapers for a popular subscrip
tion.
The committee left v.night on the
invitation of Thos. Taggart m visit
Gov. Marshall, of Indiana, the vice
presidential no m i n ee.
OLYMPIC CONTESTS
CLOSED YESTERDAY
UNITED STATES LEAD IN HONORS
WON.
Americans Scored 128 Point". Swe
den Followed Next with 104. Great
Britain Stood Third with 66. One
Death ficm Sunstroke.
Associated Press.
Stockholm, July 1.'».— The curtain
fell on the 1 1 2 Olympic today with
the United Stages well in the lead in
the points scored. American athletes
having scored 12V Sweden came
next with »t. (treat Britain third
v it h iU».
Tiie s< or s of other nations are:
Finland 4‘>, (Jermany 5-1. France 23.
South Africa In, Denmark 14. Lalv
43, d'anada 13. Australia 13, JVI
gium 11, Norway 10, Hungary s. Rus
sia 5, <1 ■ e«e :. Austria f. Holland 2.
The • *’i!*ed States also iea’.s ’n
Add track ev mts with 8." points
Finlar.d •< end with 27. Sweden
tiiird with j i. (I rent »Tri::iiu s;«tnds
fourth with ! 4.
The triumps today were divided
for the most part between the United
States and the northern nations
James Thorp, of the Carlisle Ind
ian school, proved himself the great
est all-round athlete of the world in
de< athlon.
The Portuguese runner, F. La/are.
who ran in the marathon, died to
day from the effects of sunstroke.
Lieutenant Lawrence,’a British of
ficer who was thrown to the ditch
during the military competition is
-uttering from concussion of the
brain and other serious injuries.
These events have east a shtdo.v
on the Olympic games.
The vit torious athletes appeared
before the king and his v: a jest y plac
ed laurel wreaths on their brows.
The Americans led the march.
Forbid Use of Copper Salts.
Associated Pres?
Washington. July 1 .".—The Rem
sen board has decided that the use
of copper salts in "greening” foods,
principally canned peas and beans, is
injurious to health, and the order
was signed today by Secretary Wil
son prohibiting the use of copper
salts after January 1.
Taft Notified Augu"t First.
Associated Press.
Washington. July 15.—It was de
cided today that President Taft
would be officially notified of h!«
nomination at the White House Au
gust 1. ,
Never before was it possible to cut
a diamond across the grain It is now
done by light speed electric mach
inery.
SAN BENITO
I THE
BIG CANAL T< >WN
The livest and largest new town in Texas in the
LOWER RiO.GRANOE VALLEY
San Benito has grown from nothing to over four thou-am! p -pulatioa la
four years am! today offer.-, best lo< at ion lor conmtor. ial and in
dustrial nterpri.es in Southwest Texas. Natural ad van Ago*
and improvements already made insure * ity <T in p u taoce
The growth and development have only started.
NEARLY HALF A MILLION
Dollars railrr; d business on a. Lon's, Brownsville anil Mexico Railway .
at San Bnitil >. It» one *y ar. Si:t| seven fes < in increase ove. b:;uM
of previous yea.*.
Year ending April hah 19! 1 1912
Freight received ■ 161,81 Ml »,l
Freight forwarded 42,839.33 96,1 no.31
Express received 12,539.61 15,426.53
Express forwarded IS.09X.34 19.025.4 4
Ticket sales 31,4 60.95 43,960.66
Excess Baggage 292.25 478.70
Switching, storage, and
A
demurrage No record 3,204.1 1
Total Value of Business 2IS,©50.93 414,073.65
Above represents "only the amount paid to the St. L. B. M for hand
ling business shown and NOT the VALUE OF PRODUCTS HANDLED.
EIGHTY THOUSAND ACRES OF RICH DELTA SOIL
irrigated from the big San Benito Canal surround the town of Sau Be
nito. Twenty-five thousand acres already in cultivation.
INTERURBAK RAILROAD NOW IN OPERATION
over 40,000 acres of this tract serving every , farm with convenient
freight and express service. Extension being made on the balance of
the tract. Rio Hondo, Santa Maria, (’arrieitos, Ix>s Indies anil La t’aioiua
on interurban road out of San Benito. Convenient schedule.
- IT WILL PAY YOU TO INVESTIGATE SAN BENITO
before engaging in farming, commercial or industrial enterprises else
where in Texas.
SUN BENITO UNO S ITER COMPANY. '
' SAN BENITO. TEUS. fH
---
PEOPLE’S ICE AND MANUFACTURING CO. :
Starting business in March, 1905. the price of ice was fixed at
30 cents a hundred pounds at the plant. 40 cents per hundred
pounds delivered, and the price has never been changed. This is a
record of which we are proud. Ice is sold lower in Brownsville
than in any other city in Texas cf its size. All ice is made from
puie distilled water and is clean and wholesome.
Any amount delivered at any place in the city,
The company appreciates your business and support and will
continue its present policy of accommodation. Buy an ice book
and save 5 per cent—i* is cate, as it is not transferable
S. C. TUCKER, MANAGER
SENATE DISCUSSES
QUESTION OE TOLLS
FOR AMERICAN SHIPS THROUGH
PANAMA CANAL.
Great Britain's Protect Against Free
Fassage of American Ships Through
Canal Finds Many Defenders. Root
Calls It Unjust Discrimination.
Washington, July 15.—The fighl
over the Panama canal bill opened
in the senate today i.nd Ureat Bri
tain's protest that United State* ha*
no right under the Hay-Paunceforte
treaty to pass its own coast-wise ves
-els free through the canal, while
it collect* toll* from th >.-e of tireat
Britain, found emphatic .support
Senators Burton and Root were
the spokesman. Those opposed to the
passing of American *:ips free, point
led out that tireat Britain had sur
rendered Important right* at Panema
for the pledge of “Equal treatment ’
'to all ship*.
| Uo't described the free provision
in the bill as “unjustifiable discrim
ination" against other nations.*
The matter, he said, would final
ly go to the Hague if the oill paas
>d. Th*- British statement of the pro
test is expeced within I* hour*.
! About the hardest problem some
women have to solve is how many
pleats to put in their skirts.
|
m
POLITICS CLOSES BIG STORE.
Partners Differ Over Taft and *‘T.
R." And Shut Up Shop.
Tacoma, Wash., July 1Sharp
differences ever politics between pro
prietors of one of thp department
stores in Walla Walla resulted today
in their closing it, annouftrinR that
it may never be opened again.
The proprietors hare had frantic
quarrels as a result of their advocat
ing different Presidential candidates
und decided it was best to clou* the
store and come to some agreement.
O. P. Jaycox and his two sona-lu
law, Guy Bridges and Kdward Payne,
run the store. Jaycox Is a radical
I Roosevelt supporter and Bridges la
for Taft. Jaycox would not take over
the interests of the junior partne-n
RATS ANNOY HARMON.
Pest* Persi-t in Knawing the Gov
} ernor's Signature Off Papers.
I Columbus. Ohio, July 14.— Rat#
1 are infesting Governor Harmon's ex
ecutive offices for the first time in
many year.- The ratr track ail over
notary public commIsolons, pardoo
papers and requisition blanks and
'per 1st in gnawing at the Governor'*
signature wherever It appears. J
The Governor's clerks have se* M
traps to catch the pests, but they are fl
too inte lligent and are still running |
wild Governor Garmon has gone to
hb auminer home in Michigan *»»
hup* to get away from them. fiM

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