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Brownsville herald. [volume] (Brownsville, Tex.) 1910-current, August 15, 1912, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063730/1912-08-15/ed-1/seq-1/

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WEAR EVER ALUMINUM VASE QD /"YIl/MC\7T 1 I IT UCD M Fb TRSZTcSSS
j^ssss^astssn dKUW INoV iLLL nLIxHLly. "
VOL. XIX NO. 303. BROWNSVILLE. TEXAS. THURSDAY, AUGUST 15- 1912-_ ._ PMCE_HVE
CONFEREES AGREE
ON CANAL BILL
SETTLE STATUS OF AMERICAN
OWNED SHIPS
Trust Oowr.ed Ship® Barred the
Canal Altogether—Conference Re
port Goes to Both Houses Today.
Probably Meet Opposition.
Associated Pres?.
Washington, I). C., Aug. 1 t.—An
agreemen' on the Panama Canal ad
ministration bill was reached by the
hou-e and senate conferees today,
by which free pa-sage was denied
American owned ships engaged in
foreign trade. Foreign ship build
ing materials will be admitted free
of tariff to the United S'atcs, and
the interstate commerce commission
i * given power to ureak up any com
bination of competing rail and wa
ter lines which it finds not ‘‘for the
public good.”
American ships engaged in coast
wise trade will be given free pass
age; trnst-pwned ships are prohibit
ed from u-ing the canal, and foreign
built ships will be admited to Amer
iean registry, when owned by Amer
icans, according to the provisions of
the bill agreed to.
The conference report will be sub
mitted to both the senate and house
tomorrow and it is believed will be
subjected o •some opposition.
Senator Brandage and Represen
tative Stevens of the confernce com
mittee declined to sign the report.
1/ »' *' t • II' -t • I * • - * I. •' ’■
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1/
* CATTLE SELL FOR TEN
t FIFTY AT CHICAGO *
v Associated Pres*. *!*
-r Chicago, 111., Aug. 1 1.— -I
Steers reached the highest price
v ever paid on the Chicago ex- •!
-r change when a 1(*hcJ of Indiana -!
fed Herefords sold at $10.50
JK per hundredweight. Sellers are -!*
•I- of the opinion that prime steers
v will reach eleven dollars. v
•fa *•*
A A V. Vi Vi Vi Vi V. Vi Vi V. v: Vi
% Is 4 . I 4 -4' ‘ •' •' •• * * * * * 1
-o
y vti vi m -\i v. is v.
LATE MARKET REPORTS.
-»a "i" *i* v *r *i* *»* "•* • ’* * * * *
Cotton.
New Orleans. I.a., Aug. 14.—Cot
ton futures closed strong with a net
advance of 24 to 26 points today.
Spots steady and 1-8 off.
t
Cattle.
Kansas City, Mo., Aug. 14.—Cat
tle, best, steady; others weak; ex
port steer*, $8.60 to $10.10. Hogs,
steady to string; heavies, $8.20 to
$8.30. Sheep steady.
ISIEEL BILL PASSED
OVER TAFT'S VETO
_
ONLY TWO VOTES OVER TWO
THIRDS NECESSARY
Bill Was Repasscd Within Two
Hours After its Return by Presi
dent — Insurgents Voted With
Democrat1*.
Associated Pres3.
Washington, I>. Aug. 14.—Re
peating its action of yesterday when
it passed the wool tariff hill over the
| president’3 veto, the house today re
passed the vetoed steel and iron
tariff hill within two hours after it
was returned from the Wfhite House
with the president's veto message.
The vote on the bill was 173 to S3.
This wa-- a margin of only two
votes over the necessary two-thirds
required to pas3 the bill over th«
veto of the president.
The senate at almost the same time
wa-- engaged in passing the demo
cratic cotton tariff bill sent in a
week ago by the house.
Senator La Follette’s substitute,
which represented the /iew of the
*ariff hoard, wa3 voted down, 4 6 to
16, and La Follette and eight other
progressive republicans later joined
the democrats and paascd the hill by
a vote of 36 to 1!).
An amendment was attached ro
! pealing all hut the pulp and paper
I sections of the Canadian reciprocity
law.
The repassed steel bill was sent
immediately by the house to the
j senate. With the wool bill it will
be called up Friday. An attempt
will be made then to repa-s them,
but the democratic leaders have lit
• tie hope that they can obtain the
necos ary two-thirds vote.
The insurgents contributed to the
Isucess of the democratic program in
j the house. The sixteen who voted
with the democrat3 yesterday joined
them again today.
Paraffin and linseed oil, boiled to
gether, will brighten linoleum on
which it is rubbed with a soft cloth.
-f\-.
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v -!
SENATE FASSED -::
+ PENSION BILL L:
i JU _ 1
' w '
jv- Associated Press. rr
jWashington, D. C., Aug. 14. v
—The senate today yielded to 1
!v the demands of the house for -!•
the aholition of the pension
-J- agencies throughout the United
!- States and passed the $ir>0,
j’-;- non,,000 pension appropriation
j-:- bill with a provision for the v
abolishment of the agencies on v
j -I- January, 31, 1913. -I
* *** s- x x x *!* *i: x x x x x x x x x & x x x x x x x * *
\ While In the Valley \
X ' X
* DON’T FAIL TO VISIT
I MISSION.!
*
X _
* Elevation, 14o reet.
< Irrigation, unexcelled.
* Drainage, natural.
I WE PROVE IT l
. i>
* To be the most progressive, high
j|i
ly developed, prosperous, thriv
ing proposition in the Lower Rio
* Grande Valley.
A personal investigation will con
vince you of the greater advan
#- tages and opportunities offered.
* MISSION LAND IMPROVEMENT COMP AM
% MISSION, TEXXS
l JOHN J. CONWAY
President 4P Sole Owi>er
* i- $ a X X X X X X XX X X X vris X 'X >* X -fc -h X X X X X \ X *
/
^ • > I
PLATFORM DEMANDS
EARLY CLOSING
BITTERLY OPPOSED BY ANTIS IN
CONVENTION
Convention Adjourned After Nomi
nating All Candidates Who Won
in the Primary—Big Ovation in
Honor cf Sheppard and Bailey.
Special to The Herald.
Aan Antonio, Tex., Aug. 1 1.—The
state democratic convention ad
journed -ine die 'onight after hav
ing nominated Governor O. B. Col
quitt and all other candidates who
received a majority or plurality of
the votes cast in the recent primary
election.
Much enthusiasm attended the
nominator, c“ the governor and
there was a big demonstration over
the appearance of Morris Sheppard,
the party nominee for United States
senator.
A bit'er fight developed over the
platform demand for an early saloon
closing law. and a riot ruled the
convention for nearly an hour.
Governor Colquitt stilled it by
telling the delegates he would sign
any hill the legisla'ure might pas®
in the matter of early closing unless
the platform did contain some ex
pression on that subject. The con
vention hastened to ratify the plat
form by a vote of 76fi to 1".
There was a big ovation in honor
of Senator Joseph W. Bailey prior
to the appearance of the platform
committee, and *he uproar lasted a
half hour. Guidons of most of the
senatorial districts were torn down
when Joe H. Eagle of Houston m«N^
tioned the junior -enator as one or
the greatest men ever sent by Texa®
to represent her in congr-s.
The platform recommends sweep
ing changes in the stock and bond
law, such sweeping ones that men
who opposed it told the railroad law
yers o*( the platform committee the
people of the state would smite any
legislature that dared to follow the
path laid down in the plank written
by Jonathan Lane of Houston.
The party creed demands that the
federal government do it* duty by
taking proper rare of the Texas
Mexico border during all troubles in
Mexico.
f'ompulsorv education i® urged on
the legislature and there are many
other radical changes in legislation
favored and suggested. Th° plat
form as a whofe is said to be one of
the most progres=ive ever written
and filled with ideas as to eons'ruc
tive legislation.
Much ill will exists among -ome
of the extreme antis because of the
demand for early clo*ing. They say
the governor should have made no
concessions to the pros.
_
Gross Construction Co. Chartered.
Among the charters issued at
Austin Monday is recorded the fol
lowing:
Gross Construction company
i of Waco, capital stock $ 10,000.
Incorporators: F. A. Gross, Wil
liam F. Gro-s and J. H. Nichol
, son.
This is the company which has
the con’ract for the Cameron county
court house and jail.
I
-o
*- s*
THE NATIONAL BALL GAMES
*r *n v *i* v rp r.t r»* *.* » JP ** * >
As played throughout the country
by the various leagues.
National League.
Pittsburg 3-2, Philadelphia 2-1.
No others scheduled.
American League
Chicago 6, Washington 0.
Detroit 6-1, New York 3-3.
Philadelphia 8-2, Cleveland 3-0.
: Boston S-8, St. Louis 2-0.
American Association
Columbus 9, Minneapolis 8—1
* innings.
Toledo 6, Milwaukee 3.
St. Paul 3. Ix>uisville 2.
Kansas City 3, Indianapolis 2.
t
V _
Southern T>acue
Montgomery 9, Nashville 0.
New Orlean- 4. Atlanta 0.
Memphis 9. Birmingham 4.
Others not scheduled,
f _
Texa* Leatrne.
Fort Worth 1. Austin 0.
Houston 6. San Antonio 2.
Galveston - Reaumon'—rain.
; Da! la?-Waco, no game. Dal It
team delayed by train wreck.
I
i
COM TO VOTE
I
' •" ' '*
ELECTION TO DECIDE ON $250
000 ISSUE ORDERED
i -
i
To Be Held Oet. 1—Commissioners
Also Redi'Hrict Various County
Precincts and Named Officer* for
General and Road Bond Elections.
_______
, An election to vote on a good
roads bond i-sue for $250,000 was
ordered by the county oommission
! ers' court yesterday, to he held Oct.
ls\
i In addition to this very important
work, the court also acomplPhed the
i to k of redistricting the commis
] sioners’ justice* and clec ion pre
; eincts, with which the commission
’ or* wrestled nearly all of yesterday.
| As a remit of the addition of the
*ix new precincts, it was necessary
, to appoin'. new presiding officers and
i associate officers for eaeh precineiut,
i all of which wa* disposed of.
Good Roads Bond Issue.
The good roads election is to be
| held over the entire county, as
-tatod. October 1, when the taxpav
! ers will vo e on a bond issue of
$250,000. The bonds will he for the
purpo-e of constructing, maintaining
and operating macadamized, gravel
I ed or paved roads in the county.
The election was called in accord
ance with a petition presented to
he county commissioner* and
headed by John T. Lomax of San
Benito and signed by ninety-nine
other resident property tax paying
voters of Cameron county.
It will take a two-thirds majority
of ;he entire vote cast at the election
for the bond issue to carry.
Another Drainage District Proposed.
The court set September 0 as the
date for a hearing for the proposed
Cameron county drainage distrie'
number 4. A petition for the forma
tion of such a district was presented
before the court by T. L. Phillips
and twenty-four o’her per-ons of the
district. The proposed di*triet lies
north of the Arroyo and west of Har
lingen. it comprises a comparative
ly small area.
A tax rate of $1.90 on the $100
valuation of assessed valuation was
levied again-t all real and personal
property in drainage district No. 2.
This tax is for the purpose of creat
ing a sinking fund for the payment
of the bonds.
Precinct Officers for General
Election.
The officers of the election pre
cincts as appointed yesterday are
given herewith. They will preside
at the general election to be held on
November 8:
Precinct. 1, Point Isabel, T. Pena,
presiding judge; Manuel Aguilar,
Chas. Champion and William La
roche, assistant judge?.
Precinct 2, San Rafael, J. W. Bray,
presiding judge; T. Molina, Geo. K.
French and Lucas Levrier, associate
*
judge*.
Precinct 5, Nogoles, T. H. Wil
liams. presiding judge; C. W. Starck,
a-sociate judge.
Precinct 4. part of fourth ward.
Jose Anorga. presiding judge, Miguel
Perez, Gavina Vasques and Eliseo
Munoz, asso< iato judge*.
Precinct 5, part of fourh ward.
W. K. Mendenhall, presiding judge;
! Emile Wise, George Connor and
Harry St. Clair, assoeiato judge*.
Precinct 6. third ward, C. M
Garza, presiding judge: Vicente Ta
mayo. Juan Bonis, A. Turk, associate
judge?.
Precinct T. part of second ward
V. L. Crixell. presiding judge. A. W
■ Wood. Isidore Longoria and K H
McDavitt. associate judges.
Precinct 8, first and second wards
| T. B. Russell. pre*iding judge: M
Fernandez. L. Brulay and Georgi
McGonigle, associate judges.
Piecinct 9, part of fir*t ward
Amos Rich, presiding judge: S. P
Browne, Frank Slavitchek and O. M
Davis, associate judge*.
Precinct 19, Blalack's, C. S. Moi
ton, presiding judge; J. P. Cottlns
1 ham. Geo. M Smith and H. H. Ban*
er. associate judges.
Precinct 11, OlmPo. Henry Ga;
presiding judge: P. Balli. J. R. Coni
land and M. C. Myrtle, assrfcial
judg ■'*.
Precinct 12. Encantada. IStequl
Cavazos, presiding judge; J. E. Ke
ler, A. J Hood and Jose Villarea
associate judges.
• Fr^cinct 13, South San Benito, j
P. Hicks, presiding judge; Jo-er
Ballinger. George A. Fearnow ar
A. C. Purvis, associate judges.
Precinct 14. North San Benito, V
B. Hinkley, presiding judge; I. M
l> Fadden B. If. Crazier and W.
^Freeman, associate judges.
■ .-r :: , •
CITIZENS ORGANIZE
TO HELP OFFICERS
NEW YORKERS AROUSED OVER
ROSENTHAL CASE
Becker Denies Having Money in
Bank. Though Bank Records Ten'
a Different Story—Murderer* Will
be Tried Separately in September.
i Associated Pres-.
New York, Aug. 14.—A vigilance
committee of prominent men and
women was appointed at a mass
meeting of citizens of New York,
held at Cooper Union hall to see tha
the public officer' now engaged in
exposing tit*' "treasonable alliance of
t«he police with organized crime,”
do their full duty.
The mas* meeting which typified
the public indigna ion aroused over
the revelations of police corruption
growing out of the murder of Her
man Rosenthal was attended by a
crowd which overflowed the hall. It
was one of the largest "town meet
inns” heici in t'aI; c.ty for years.
Police Lieutenant Charles Becker
todav denied through hi3 counsel
j
that he ever possessed the $18,81."
credited to his name or hat of his
wife in New York banks.
However, District Attorney Whit
man obtained statements of hanks
today showing that Becker had de
posited $62,3(1.
It is stated that Rosenthal's slay
ers will be brought to trial withoiC
delay. The plan is to try them sep
arately. The first trial will occur
in September.
At water bag patented by an Illi
nois man is made of material which
permits just enough of its contents
to exude through its sides to cool
the rest by evaporation.
Precinct 15, Santa Maria, W. \V.
Stokings, presiding judge; E. Lon
goria, Joseph Champion and S. A.
Pipes, associate judges.
Precinct 1G, Las Ye<5cas, Pablo
Falcon, presiding judge: J. A. Ram
irez, A. Galvez and Jose Saldana, a -
sociate judges.
Precinct 17, Rio Hondo. Neal Mc
Donald, presiding judge; F. M. Paul,
jr., a-sociate judge.
Precinct 18, La Feria, Harry Mc
Neil, presiding judge; Miguel Cham
p'on, Ernest Yznaga and Juan Solis,
associate judges.
Precinct t£, Harlingen, Ja«. H.
Dishman. presiding judge: L. G.
Nichols, S. C. Moore and A. H. Wel
ler, a-sociate judges.
Precinct 20, Lyford, which in
cludes Raymondvillo, W. H. Jersig.
presiding judge: E. M. Sorenson, S
L. Gill and B. I). Stevenson, asso
ciate judges.
Precinct Officers for Road Bond
Election.
The voting places and the presid
ing officers of the bond election to
be held Oc tober 1 are as follows:
Precinct 1, Point Isabqj; T. Pena,
manager.
Precinct 2, Little Indiana school
house: J. W. Bray, manager.
Precinct 3, Nogoles; H. H. Wil
liams, manager.
Precinct 4. Clay’s Bakery; Pedrn
Vasquez, manager.
Precinct 5, brick house of John
: McCHntock on Elizabeth street; W
K. Mendenhall, manager.
Precinct 6, City Hall; Juan Boni-,
manager.
Precinct 7, Obreras hall; Georgf
Stowe, manager.
Precinct 8, house of Mrs. H. Bol
lack on Elizabeth s reet; L. H. Hat
I
lam, manager.
Precinct 9, Winstedt apartmenl
.•house; J. C. DeBruin, manager.
. j Precinct 10, Blalaok school house
' J. P. Cottingham, manager.
Precinct 11, Olmito s- hool house
. D. P. Gay, manager.
Precinct 12. Encantada schoo
. house; J. E. Keller, manager.
Precinct 13, house of O. I. Hick
- on Boulevard, San Benito; Josep
- . Roy. manager.
Precinct 14, Porter’s garage, nort
of St. L. B. k M. R.v., San Benito
\ J. H. Porter, manager.
i_ Precinct 15, Santa Maria schoc
p house: J. W. Stocking, manager.
Precinct 16, Las Yescas ra.ocl
d Pablo Falcon, manager.
I- ■ Precinct 17. Rio Hondo scho
1. house; F. M Paul, jr.. manager.
j Precinct 18, Longoria store. L
L Feria; S. J Schnorenberg. manage
h 1 Precinct 19, office of Rio Grant
id I^and Corporation, Harlingen; C. V
Clift, manager.
Precinct 20, office of Lyfoi
r- CouVnt: W. J tjcar, manager.
^ The commissioners adjourned la
evening until Saturday.
l i ^
HOUSE MAY GHANI
ONE BATTLESHIP
DEMOCRATIC CAUCUS RECEDES
FROM ORIGINAL POSITION
Looks Like Compromise Between the
House and Senate on Battleship
Isgue—Believed that Senate Will
Accept the One-Ship Plan.
Associated Pres3.
Washington, D. C., Aug. 14.—
After a fight extending over many
weeks the house democrat3 toda>
agreed in caucus to recede from
their “no battleship" program at
this se3sion and permit the battle
ship champions to vote for one such
vessel.
Unlike the preceding caucus there
was an absence of bitterness and by
a vote of 95 to 11 the resolution of
recession was put through.
It is expected the senate will
agree to the one TTattle-hip plan,
ending the deadlock over the naval
bill.
While the solid support of the
majority will not be given to the
battleship program the leaders are
confident they will have more than
the strength necessary to pass the
bill, when aligned with republican
friends of the navy.
The resolution states that no
member is bound to vote for the bat
tleship should he not desire to do so.
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v •?
SALOONS MUST CLOSE
AT NINE THIRTY >
• _ > *
-• «*
Associated Pre.:v *>
-I* San Antonio. Tex.. Aug. 14. -I
—A plank in the dcmocra.ic *5!
plaform provides for closing of v
v saloons at 9:30 o'clock every +
week night. -I
Walter Collins of Hill county
K- was elected state chairman.
L:
• , • • • • • • * • • • i • • • • •
*.* V *.* *.* V V *.* *.* .* V V
WHITMAN S MEN
SECURE SCHEPPS
Hot Springs. Ark., Aug. 1 t Rep
resentatives of District Attorney
Whitman of New York arrived to
day, and tonight Sam Schepps. held
as a material witness in connection
with the Rosenthal murder In New
York, was given into their en-'ody
They will probably start for New
York with Schepps tomorrow.
-o
ARMY BILL PASSED
SENATE YESTERDAY
Washington. IV C„ Aug. 14.—The
senate at a late session tonight
passed the army appropriation hill
carrying ninety-four million dollars.
This hill replaces that which was
originally passed and which was
vetoed by the president.
The new bill did not carry the
provision of the original which
wquld have legislated out of official
life Major (lenearl Leonard II. Wood,
chief of staff of the army.
SAN BENITO
THE
BIG CANAL TOWN
The livest and largest new town in Texas in the
LOWER RIO GRANDE VALLEY
San Benito has grown from nothing to over four thousand population In
four years and today offers best location for commercial and In
dustrial nterprices in Southwest Texas. Natural advantages
and improvements already made timuru city t*f importance.
The growth and development hr.re only started.
NEARLY HALF A MILLION
Dollars railrc; d business on St. Louis, Brownsville and Mexico He.lwaj*
at San Benito, in one year. Sixty-seven per com I_.reas-e ov*s. !• ti. ■
of previous year.
Vear ending April 30th 191! 1912
Freight received 112,819.41 235,889.2b
Freight forwarded 42,839.33 96,lb»*.31 ,4
Express received 12,539.64 15,426 23
Express forwarded 18,898.34 19,02*.44
Ticket sales , 31,460.95 43,960 66
Excess Baggage 292.25 478.70
Switching, storage, and
demurrage No record 3,204.1 1
Total Value of Business 24 8,050.95 414,075.65
Above represents only the amount paid to the St. L. B. & M for hand
ling business shown and HOT THE VALUE OF PRODUCTS HANDLED.
EIGHTY THOUSAND ACRES OF RICH DELTA SOIL
irrigated from the big San Benito Canal surround the town of Sau Be
nito. Twenty-five thousand acres already in cultivation.
INTERURBAN RAILROAD NOW IN OPERATION
over 40,000 acres of this tract serving every farm with con*cnlent
freight and express service. Extension being made on the balame of
the tract. Rio Hondo, Santa Maria, Carricitos, Los Indios and I.* Palo m a
on lnterurban road out of San Benito. Convenient schedule.
IT WILL PAY YOU TO INVESTIGATE SAN BENITO
before engaging in farming, commercial or industrial enterprises else
where in Texas.
SAN BENITO LAND 5 WATER COMPANY.
,Mj BENITO, 1EXAS.
:1 PEOPLE’S IGE m MANUFACTURING CO.
Starting business in March, 1905, the price of ice was fixed at
30 cents a hundred pounds at the plant, 40 cents per hundred
pounds delivered, and the price has never been changed. This is a
i. record of which we are proud. Ice is sold lower in Brownsville
than in any other city in Texas of its size. All ice is made from
j pure distilled water and is clean and wholesome.
a J Any amount delivered at any place in the city,
The company appreciates your business and support and will
• j continue its present policy of accommodation. Buy an ice book
and save 5 per cent—i* is safe, a* it is not transferable
l S. C. TUCKER, MANAGER

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