OCR Interpretation


Brownsville herald. [volume] (Brownsville, Tex.) 1910-current, August 17, 1912, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of North Texas; Denton, TX

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063730/1912-08-17/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

BROWNSVILLE HERALD
BROWNSVILIE'HARDWARE *00 yl\\J YY lYkJ r IA-liLuJU4 A AJ-4AXinLJLiA^r* BROWNSVILLE HARDWARE CO
VOL. XIX NO. 305. BROWNSVILLE. TEXAS SATURDAY, AUGUST 17. 1912. PRICE FIVE CENTS.
MARYLAND EDITORS
DEAR PRESIDENT
TAFT MAKES FIRST REGULAR
CAMPAIGN1 SPEECH
«
Says Electors Are Dishonest if They
Let Their Names Appear on Party
Ballot and Then Vote for Some
Other Party.
Associated Press.
Washington. I). C., Aug. 16.—
President Taft made his first speech
of a political nature, today, since he
was notified of his renomination.
Addressing the members of the
Maryland republican editorial asso
ciation at the White House, he de
clared bluntly that presidential
electors are dishonest men if they
let their names appear on a repub
lican ballot and intend to vote for
the candidate of any other party.
He asserted that those not for the
republican party are against it, and
should get out of the way.
“All we ask is a fair figh1,” said
Taft, “and a man can not be in the
republican party and in the third
party at the same time, and should
be ceompelled to make his selection.”
---o
SENATE CONFIRMS
ARMY APPOINTMENTS
Af ociated Press.
Washing’on, D. C., Aug. 16.—
Among other appointments con
firmed in executive session of the
senate tonight was that of Colonel
B. Z. Steever, of the Fourth IT. S.
cavalry, stationed at Fort Bliss,
Texas, as brigadier general. Since
the death of C.en. Duncan Col.
Steever has been in charge of the
Texas department.
Brigadier General Edwards waJ
confirmed as an officer of the line,
and Col. Frank McIntyre as chief of
the bureau of insular affairs, with
the rank of brigadier general.
* x x .« x x x x x x x x
LATE MARKET REPORTS.
^ x x
Cotton.
Associated Press.
New Orleans, La., Aug. 16.—Cot
ton futures clo-ed easy with a net
decline of I?S to 41 points today.
Spots, easy.
Cattle.
Associated Press.
Kansas City, Mo., Aug. 16. Cat
tle, steady; export steers ranged
from $8.60 to $10.40. Hogs, lower;
heavies quoted at $8.10 to
Sheep were strong.
LAFOllEIlE SCORES
: PROGRESSIVE PARTY
DECLARES ALLEGIANCE TO PRO
GRESSIVE REPUBLICANISM
.. - —
Reviews the Ti ust Record of Roose
velt—Declares He Will Keep o n
Fighting Until the Last Bell Ring*
and Curtain Falls.
Associated Pres*.
Washington. O. C., Aug. 16.—In
a picturesque outburst during the
debate on the president’s wool tariff
veto in the senate today, Senaor
Robert La Follette, of Wisconsin, at
tacked the new progressive party
and swore a new allegiance to pro
gre-sive republicanism.
Quivering with emotion the “orig
inal insurgent” assured his asso
ciates that he intended “to keep up
the fight in the republican party to
make the party really progressive,
and to keep on until the last bell
rings and the curtain falls.’’
After reviewing the trust record
of Theodore Roosevelt briefly, La
Follet e declared the former presi
dent was not the man to find the
way out now.
He declared that when a point
was reached when the republican
party would not respond o the pur
poses for which it was horn, an at
tempt was made at Chicago to di
vide it.
O- --
Confirmation Held Up.
Associated Press.
Wa-hington, D. C., Aug. 16.—The
nomination of Segundino Romero as
United S"ates marshal of New Mex
ico, confirmed by the senate yester
day, was recalled in executive ses
sion tonight. Senator Bacon who
made the motion said charges were
filed that alleged that Romero, while
-heriff, assaulted former Judge E. V.
I/Ong of New Mexico. The appoint
ment will come up again next week.
_ ___
PIANO DEMONSTRATION
WAS COMPLETE SUCCESS
L. A. Prowse and Thomas F.
Logan, representatives of Thos. Gog
gan & Bros., piano dealers with
headquarters at San Antonio, today
will complete the week’s demon-tra
tion and sale of pianos and musical
instruments handled by that firm,
which they have been conducting.
They occupied a store rooine on
Elizabeth, near 11th street.
Messrs. Prowse and Logan report
a very satisfactory business during
>;heir stay here, during which time
they have placed quite a number of
pianos.
+ i. .! j. •> •••
i While In the Valley \
* , i
* *
DON'T FAIL TO VISIT
EMISSION.
* Elevation, 14 o feet.
* *
* Irrigation, unexcelled.
* Drainage, natural.
. j WE PROVE IT \
St ' *
St V
* To be the most progressive, high
^ ly developed, prosperous, thriv
ing proposition in the Lower Rio
* Grande Valley.
* A personal investigation will con
vince you of the greater advan
* ^
^ tages and opportunities offered. ?
i MISSION LAND IMPROVEMENT COMPANY ■
* MISSION, TEXAS
: JOHN J. CONWAY
^ President tf Sole Owner
*
************** :**********#******:
f >
\
MISSION CANAL
ON COSINESS BASIS
FIRST STEP TAKEN BY ASKING
FOR RECEIVER
Nece*sarv in Order to Finance Ex
tensive Improvements Which Are
Being Installed to Increase Ca
pacity of Plant.
Special to the Herald.
Houston, Tex., Aug. 16.—One of
the firs steps towards placing one
of the largest irrigation proposi
tions in the Lower Rio Grande Val
ley on a better bu-iness basis was
taken here today, when the Bankers’
Trust company, acting in i s capac
ity as tru-tee. made application foh;
the appointment of a receiver for
the properties of the Mission Canal
company of Mission, Texas.
The application was presented by
Messrs. Andrews, Ball and Street
man as attorneys for the trust com
pany, to Judge Norman G. Kittrell,
of the Gist drs rict court, who
granted the application and appoint
ed J. L. Malone of Mission, Texa-.
as received, who will qualify at once.
It i- stated that this proceeding
is entirely friendly in character up
on the part of all parties at inter
est, and is a step toward the reor
ganization and more adequate fi
nancing of the irrigation end of ’.he
Mi-sion property.
John J. Conway, president of the
Mission Canal company, and named
in the petition as one of it- largest
creditors, made the following sta:e
ment:
“The rapid development at Mis
sion, e-peeially the great increase in
the number of farms demanding wa
ter, has made it necessary o extend
ami enlarge the capacity of the
canal properties.
One of Pioneer Canals.
"The Mission Canal company wa
organized at the beginning of the
development in the Lower Rio
Grande Valley at a time when we
could no: forsec many of the prob
lems that have developed, in par
ticular the securities of the company
are not large enough to adequately
finance, what is required in order to
furnish water to he lands now be
ing brought under irrigation.
“Also we have learned a great
deal by experience as to the pro
visions that should bp embodied in
water contracts for the proi eetion
both of the canal company and of
the farmer.
“This company has outstanding a
number of different forms of con
tracts and it is qui e important that
all contracts should be uniform and
all consumers placed on the same
basis.
“This proceeding is advised by
the attorneys as necessary for legal
and technical reasons more than
from any serious financial om
baras-ment.
Installing Extensive Improvements.
"The purpose is to adequately re
organize and finance the irrigation
end of the Mission proposition, and
the appointment of the receiver will
in no manner interfere either wi li
the continued operation of the canal
or with the improvements and addi
tions now being made thereon.
"We are at thi- ime installing
two large forty-eight inch pumps
and doing considerable dirt work to
increase the capacity and this work
will be carried forward without in
terrup1; ion.
The capital stock of the present
j company is only $331,000 and it has
outstanding a bonded indebtedness
of that amount."
Mr. Malone gave‘bond a- receiver
in the sum of $10,000.
This proceeding does no- in any
manner affect the Mission Land and
Improvement company, nor any of
the other large vompanies in which
Mr. Conway is interested.
-o
j. j;
^ -f
* 1
REBELS SACK
: CONSUL’S RANCH *
■ -!• Associated Press. v
£ San Luis Potosi, Mex., Atig. v
■ 10.—Frank A. Dickinson, the v
t American consul here, was ad- -!
vised today by the manager of v
* -!- his ranch near Aboalo. Guana
t L;- juato, that the ranch wa~ -!
i* *{- -acked by rebels yesterday. %
h- Horses, saddles and monev -!
!? 4? we're taken and a number of his -!
k -I- employes were beaten.
^ jr j- *

REBEL TROOPS
VACATE JUAREZ
Associated Press.
v Juarez, Mex., Aug. ill.—The -!
-!- city of Juarez tonigh is with
-!• out soldiers, the last rebels
-I- leaving today. The city is or
v derly. Hastily appointed po- -1
-!- lice are patrolling the -treets. -!
Juarez has been occupied by
rebels since lafct February.
__
Associated Prers.
El Paso, Tex., Aug. Id.— -;
It is expected that federal
troops will anyve in Juarez in
two or three days. A thou-and v:
rebels who started from Palo- -!
-!- ma- for Juarezl yesterday re- -!
turned o Palomas today. Which -!
-!- way the rebels at Palomas -!
-I- will move is problematic, as is
the course to be pursued by
I- Orozco. -!:
» •„
FANATICAL TURKS
MURDER'CURISIMS
(
1 .
Albania Scene of jHorrible Butchery
of Men. Women and Children by
Soldiers and Fahatic*.
Associated Presj.
Cettinje, Aug. 1fi.—Reports are
gaining circulation tonight of tlie
ma-sacre of Christians by Moham
edan* in Albania. The lat er, sup
ported by Turkish troops, it is
stated, attacked the section of the
Christian population of he Berana
district of Albania, and after a fierce
fight women and children were mur
dered by wholesale and girls were
made captive-.
-o
.
r'c \
TO DEMAND EXTRADITION
OF REBEL FUGITIVE :
-I- Associated Press. . *!•
-!- Mexico City. "Mex., Aug. Ifi. *-!
v —Minister of foreign aaairs, -!
-I- Lascurain, today confirmed the
-I- report that the Mexican gov
v ernment intends to a-k the ex- -!
tradtion of David de la Fuente, -!
-I- held a; El Paso, Texas, charged
I- with violating the neutrality
law-. It is understood lie will %
!- be charged with complicity in
-I- robbing the National Bank of \
Chihuahua during the oc- *!
pancy of that city by the -I
-! rebels. The money taken from
the bank was at that time was
-I placpd in the war chest of the
r!- rebels.
« , ^
-y
SENATE FAILED TO
REVERSE VETO *
!- Washington, D. C., Aug. 1f>.
—The senate late this after
!- noon failed to pas- the wool -I
•!- tariff revision hill over the
president’s veto. The vo e was
29 to 4t>. falling far short of -!
v the two-thirds neces-ary. -!*
.k -j
V *!4 V 4
I , I I » 4 4.4* • • •
THE NATIONAL BAIL GAMES
, , , . . f - 4 ,4 - 4 • * • •># ♦ » • * * #'
-.* -
As played throughout the country
by the various leagues.
National Leagne.
Now York 7, Chicago 4.
St. Louis 1, Boston 5.
Cincinnati 4, Brooklyn 3.
Philadelphia 5, Pit sburg 3.
American League.
Detroit 9, New York 8.
St. Ix>ui- 3. Boston 2.
Philadelphia 3, Cleveland 1.
.Washington 4. Chicago 0.
American Association
Minneapolis 4. Columbus 2.
Wilwaukee 3. Indianapolis 1.
Toledo 4. St Paul 1.
Kansas City 4, Louisville 3.
Southern Leagne.
Atlanta 7, Mobile 2.
Montgomery 4, Memphis 0.
Nashville - Birmingham—rain.
New Orleans 4. Chattanooga 2.
Texas Leagne.
Dallas 2-4, Waco ©-C.
Au-tin Fort Worth 1.
Others postp~“‘“1 '"n account c
.rain.
I
ROOSEVELT APPEALS
TD NEW ENGLAND
i —
TO LEAD IN MOVEMENT OF
PROGRESSIVES
Declares Newspapers Are Controlled
by Intere‘,t*—Says the Only Way
To fight Boss Rules is by Means
of Progressive Party.
Associated Pres?.
Providence. R. I., Aug. 1*',.—An
appeal for leader-hip from Now Eng
land in the movement ot the pro
gressive party was made here to
nigh’ by Theodore Roosevelt in hi
first speech since he received the
nomination in Chicago.
He declared the ordinary voter
had nothing to hope for through the
success of either the democratic or
l
republican parties, which lie as- ;
ser ed are equally boss ridden.
“Only by supporting the progres
sive party, tan you strike any ef
fective blow against boss rule and
machine and ring politics,” he -aid. j
He declared the representatives of
privilege in finance and politics con- i
trol most of he newspapers, and it
is a matter of real regret that the
news columns are closed to u-\
The tariff was the principal sub
ject of his speech.
“We -tami for a protective tariff”
he said, “but we wish to see the
benefit? of protective tariff get into
the pay envelopes."
“For the republican tariff pro
posal,” he -aid, “is tariff for privilege
in industry, while the democrats
propose to destroy industry."
He defined the progressive pro- j
posal as a tariff in the interest of
labor industry.
He urged reform of 'the currency
system so a? to make it beyond the
control of Wall street.
IRRIGATION DISTRICT
HELD 10 EE INVALID
Opinion of Attorney General Ad
verse to Project of the Raymond
ville-Lyford Section.
According to a sjwh ial from Aus
tin to the Houston Chronicle of
Wednesday. Aug. IT. the law under
which tlie* Union irrigation di-triet
of Cameron county was organized
has been declared invalid by the at
torney general of the state. The
opinion wa« given by that official o
Judge James B. Wells of Browns
ville. who visited Austin Wednes
day in the interest of the Union ir
* •
rigation district, for which Judge
Wells is the attorney. The Chronicle
special follows:
Austin, Tex., Aug. IT.—The at
torney general's department today,
through Assistant Attorney General
S. F. Caldwell, held he irrigation
[district law of 190.7 to be unconsti
tutional. consequently no irrigation
bonds can be approved under this
-tatute it is found by Assli ant At
torney General Caldwell.
He says the act is in numerous in
dances in conflict with the consti
tution, especially the section relat
ing to the tenure of office for such
district. “The tenure of office for
the director af the irrigation district
is fixed a<* four years,” declare?
Judge Caldewll. “The constitution
of our state fixes the term at t,wc
year- (article 16, section 30. > Thi?
law can not operate wP.hout the di
rectors, and it seem? clear that the
legislatuer would not have passet
any of the statute without the volt
provisions.” This opinion was t<
Judge Jame- B. Wells of Browns
I ville, who had submitted the recon
I for the Union irrigation district o
Cameron county.
-o
Weather.
Meteorological report for the 2
hours ending at 7 p. m. Aug. IS:
Barometer at 7 a tn .... 29.9
Barometer at 7 p. m.29.9
Temperature at 7 a. m ... 79.1
Temperature at 7 p m. ... 83.2
Maximum temperature ... 94 T
Minimum temperature . . - 77.2
Forecast.
Associated Press.
Washington. D. C.f Aug. K
f | Ea t and West Texas—General
fair Saturday and Sunday.
MEMBERS OPPOSE
THE CANAL BILL
i
CHARGED THAT CONFEREES
ADDED NEW MATTER
House Adjourned Last Night as Best
Way Out of Embarrassing Situa
tion—Provision for Free Ship
Building Material Added.
As-ociated Pres?.
Washington, P. C., Aug. HI.—
Such unexpected opposition to the
amended Panama Canal bill devel
oped in the hou-e tonight that an
adjournment was taken as the best |
wv out of an embarrassing situation.
Representatives Moore and Olm
stead. who led the a tack, charged '
that the conferee- added matter not
pas-ed upou by either the house or
the senate and had exceeded their '
an horitv.
The senate earlier in the day
adopted the conference report by a
vote of 4S to IS.
In the house especial stress was
laid on the fact that a provision for
he free entry of ship building ma
terial into the canal zone \va- in
jected into the measure.
SENATE SUSTAINS
PRESIDENT’S VETOES

TARIFF REVISION BILLS FAILED
TO PASS
The Vote to Override Veto of Metal
Tariff Bill Fell Short of Actual
Majority—Other Bills Lacked the
Nece'-sary Two-thirds.
Ast-ociated Pres-'.
Washington. D. F., Aug. 1ft.—The
senate today voted to sustain the
president’s vetoes on the wool aud
metal ariff revision bills.
On the metal bill the motion to
override the president did not even
obtain a majority.
The vote for overriding the veto
on the metal bill was X2 for. S8
against.
iff
Senator Robert La Follette made a
motion to repass the wool bill. He
as-ert -1 i\ wo a protective tariff
measure and wa* framed according
to the tariff board's report.
La Follette asserted that the fail
ure of the president to accept the
judgment of congress was an
usurpation of power.
Senator Heyburn answered La
Follette. and denounced the bill as a
democratic measure.
The vote was .lb for pasisng the
bill and :ift against.
SAN BENITO
THE
BIG CANAL TOWN
The livest and largest new town in Texas in tlie
LOWER RIO GRANDE VALLEY
San Benito has grown from nothing to over four thousand population In
four years and today offers best location for commercial and In
dustrial nterpric.es In Southwest Texas. Natural advantages
ami improvements already made iuautc city < f imp >iluuce.
The growth and development have only started.
NEARLY HALF A MILLION
Dollars railrc: d business on St. Louis, Brownsville and Mexico Riliwaj
at San Benuo, in one year. Sixty reven per cent Increase o»v. to. id ties*
of previous year.
"ear ending April 30th 191! 1912
Freight received 142,319.11 235,8X0.20
Freight forwarded 42,839.33 96,100.31
Express received 12,53 9. t'» 4 15,426.23
Express forwarded 18,098.34 19,025.44
Ticket sales 31.460.95 43,960 66
Excess Baggage 292.25 478 70
Switching, storage, and
demurrage No record 3,204.11
Total Value of Business 248,050.96 414.075.65
Above represents only the amount paid to the St. L R. & M. for hand
ling busineat shown and NOT THE VALUE OF PRODUCTS HANDLED
EIGHTY THOUSAND ACRES OF RICH DELTA SOIL ■
irrigated from the big San Benito Canal surround the town of San Be
nito. Twenty-live thousand acres already in cultivation.
INTERURBAN RAILROAD NOW IN OPERATION
over 40,000 acres of this tract serving every farm with convenient
freight and express service. Extension being made on the balante of
the tract. Rio Hondo, Santa Maria, Carricitos, Ixm Indios and La Baloiua
on interurban road out of San Benito. Convenient schedule.
IT WILL PAY YOU TO INVESTIGATE SAN BENITO
before engaging in farming, commenial or industrial enterprise* el*s»
where in Texas.
SAN BENITO LAND 5 WATER COMPANY.
SIN BENITO. TEXAS.
>
4
ly
• ■' y !
i
V- : /

xml | txt