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Brownsville herald. [volume] (Brownsville, Tex.) 1910-current, September 06, 1912, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063730/1912-09-06/ed-1/seq-1/

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n i n i^Lr ?lLL0^ t * __ CALORIC FIRELESS COOKERS
01 *’ I FT US SHOW^niT^8 S Mo*t S®®^111^ and Convenient
BROWNSVILLE HARDWARE CO BROWNSVILLE HARDWARE CO
VOL. XIX NO. 321. . BROWNSVILLE. TEXAS FRIDAY- SEPTEMBER 6. 1912 PRICE FIVE CENTS.
GUARANTEE FUAD
FOR SUGAR STATION
SUGAR GROWERS APPOINT A
FINANCE COMMITTEE
Must Raise $2500 as Guarantee Be*
fore State Will Do Its Part To
ward* Locating the Experimental
Sugar Station Here.
The appointment of a finance com
mittee consisting of <\ E. Barber,
<\ n. Cowgill anti \V. C. Shaw, was
the main business undertaken at
the meeting of the Rio Grande Cane
Growers ’ Association yesterday
morning. A resolution was adopted
making the Louisiana Planter and
Sugar Manufacturer the official
organ of the association.
The finance committee will ar
range a plan for raising the sum of
12500 as a guarantee required by
the state of Texas from the Valley
planters before it will go into the
matter of locating a cane experimen
tal station here. The matter of an
appropriation by the state will come :
up before the next legislature, and
this guarantee is to be made so as to
enable the state to locate the sta
tion without the necessity of wait
ing until the meeting of the legisla
ture. The federal government has
already appropriated $10,000 for
thi« station.
A stalk of sugar cane was shown ,
at the meeting, raised at Santa Maria i
by Pedro Longoria. The stalk is
eight feet six inches long, has twen
ty red joints, and weighs seven and
a half ponds. It will lie sent to the
Louisinana Planter at New Orleans.
Louisiana can not mature cane like
this until January 1.
-o
A locomotive built in Philadelphia
in 1X47 still is doing good work on
a railroad in Cuba.
SrQCK LAW WANTED
Committee Appointed to Investigate !
Matter—Farmers <n Canal Sec
tion* Are Deeply Concerned.
Following the meeting of the
farmers and business men on the
Brownsville irrigation question yes
terday afternon, those who attended
the meeting took up the matter of a
stork law for this county. Follow
ing the motion. R. C. Wharton, I. G.
Keeler and John Copeland were ap
pointed to investigate the best meth
od of preceding in the securing of
such a law.
i. G. Keeler said this was a ques
tion of deep concern to every farmer
ill the canal sections. He said that
in some places it was practically im
possible to keep stock off newly
planted lands.
Judge W. E. Hawkins stated that
the representative of this district
could draw up a bill, to be presented
before the next legislature, calling
for Cameron county to be placed
under the operation of the stock
law's. After this districts may be
laid off and voted as desired.
When the committee is ready to
report, a meeting will be called to
con-ider the matters in question.
\V\hat need had Eve of new dresser
with nobody to envy them?—Char
leston New and Courier.
-o
TIGERS FOR SALE •
A pair (male and female) beautj
fill Mexican tigers., golden and blael
-potted. They are six months old
and thoroughly accustomed to man
Address T. L. Care Herald.
^ 7T n. t • » • i i\ ..
\ While In the Valley ;
DON’T FAIL TO VISIT
* *
*
*
*
*
* #•
* Elevation, 14o feet. »
$ *
« Irrigation, unexcelled. *
&
* Drainage, natural. *
I WE PROVE IT |
* *
* To he the most progressive, high- +
ly developed, prosperous, thriv
ing proposition in the Lower Rio
* Grande Valley.
t A personal investigation will con- +
if
vince you of the greater advan- +
* tages and opportunities offered.
: MISSION LAND IMPROVEMENT COMPANY :
» MISSION. TEXAS *
* JOHN J. CONWAY »
President V Sole Owner -f
* *
#*************;**£{;***************
LARGER CROP
AND LESS MONEY
LARGEST COTTON ACREAGE
KNOWN IN SOUTH
Secretary of New Orleans Cotton Ex
change Declare'' Decrease in Pr'ces
this Year is Due to Poor Quality
of Product.
Associated Press.
New Orleans, La., Sept. 5.—The
cotton crop of the South for the year
ending August 31, 1912, exceeded
that of the previous year by 4,078,
331 bales, yet its money value wa
it 07,07 4,82.1 less, according to sta
tistics compiled by H. CL Hester, sec
retary of the New Orleans Cotton
Exchange.
This is due as much to the low
grade of the crops as to the decrease
in price resulting from overproduc
tion.
It is the lowest grade crop in ten
years, ihe average being strictly low
middling, to middling, compared
with a slight shade under strict mid
lling la-1 year.
Mr. Hester says the acreage is the
'argest ever cultivated in co ton in
Uie Southern states.
One factor which contributed to
he monster crop wa- that the boll
weevil was greatly reduced in num
bers over the entire range. The in
ect was exterminated in an area
‘overing about 23,000 square miles
n Northwest Texas and Western
Oklahoma.
For middling the average price
o r pound was 10.16 cen's, compar
'd with 14.60 cents last year. The
‘otal value of the crop was $S10,
280,764. Adding the value of the
cotton seed, the actual wealth pro
ducing capacity of the Southern
states cotton farms was $937,
710,073. Last year the total value,
ncluding the seed, was $1,030,128,
‘>27 for 1 2,1 20,09.3 hales. For ‘he
year just closed the total production
was 16,138,426 hales. The con
sumption la^t year was the heaviest
hi record, says the report of Hester.
The world consumed, he says,
14,.r> 1 .">,000 hales, an increase over
‘he previous year of 2,4 61,000.
Texas con-timed 4 6,406 bales, an
ncrease of 8,190 over ihe previous
year. The total Southern mill con
sumption was 2,744,067 bales, an
increase of 380,000.
_A
1U JK .fc
THE WEATHER.
•i u. i;- *
Meteorological report for the 24
hours ending at 7 p. m. Sept. 5;
Barometer at 7 a. m.29.9*1 |
Barometer at 7 p. m.29.92
Temperature at 7 a. m. . . . 74.4
Temperature at 7 p. m. ... 82.S
Maximum temperatuer ... 91.5
Minimum temperature ... 72.9

Forecast.
Associated Press.
Washington, D. C., Sept. 5.—
East and West Texas—Generally
lair Friday and Saturday: not quite
*o warm Saturday.
-o
+ <
THE NATIONAL BALL GAMES
-i- h- *:• * * * *
Aa played throughout the country
by the various leagues.
Associated Press.
National League.
New York 8-4. Philadelphia 1-2.
Pittsburg 5, St. IxmiIs 4.
Brooklyn 4, Boston 2.
Cincinnati 4. Chicago 1.
American League.
Philadelphia 19-5, New York 9-2,
second game called in sixth inning
arcouiit of darkness.
Bos Jon 4, Washington 2.
Cl Jtago 4. Cleveland 1.
St juxmis at Detroit, rain.
Southern League.
Nashville 8, Atlanta 6.
pMuuingham 7, Montgomery 1.
(Mattanooga 7, Memphis 5.
■obile-New Orleans, off day.
f American Awociaticn
| Kansas City 7, Minneapolis 2.
M Louisville 5, Indianapolis 3.
f Milwaukee 2, St. Paul 1.
FARMER'S WANT
DIRECT ELECTION
OF PRESIDENT. SENATORS AND
SUPREME JUDGES
Demand Better Transportation Regu
lations* Restricted Ownership of
Land by Corporations. Referendum
and Recall. Presidential Primaries.
- •
Associated Press.
Chattanooga, Tenn.. Sept. The
national Farmers' Union meeting in
convention here, adopted resolutions
today urging the abolition of the
electoral college and the election of
president by a direct vote, the direct
election of United States supreme
court judges, and senators, enact
ment of laws preventing corpora
tions from owning more land than
necesasry to conduct their business
he regulation of transportainrates
so that exorbitant and discrimina
tory rates shall be aboli-hed, and
urging that political conventions he
abolished and primaries substituted.
The initiative, referendum and re
call are endorsed and a rigid corrupt
practice act is asked.
-__*»
First Week Shows Normal Attend
ance at Each of Three Local Edu
cational Institutions
The Academy of the Incarnate
Word opened auspiciously the first
of this week for the school session
of 1912-1.1. There were between 90
and 1 On young ladies at the opening,
hut all he hoarders have not vet ar
rived. With their arrival it is ex
pected that the attendance will be
materially increased.
| At the school of the Immaculate
Concepcion, the attendance has fall
en off as compared with that of last
year. This is oau-ed by the fact
'that the Oblate Fathers have opened
a school near the sugar mill, some
of the little girls who formerly at
tended school at Brownsville having
this year enrolled there.
| An average enrollment entered
the Boy-’ Parochial School, the at
tendance there numbering from 115
to 120. This is considered a good
showing for the first of the year.
-o
HOP-TOADS TO FIGHT
CAPITAL ARMY WORMS

New Jersey Woman Makes Recom
mendation—One Toad’s Appetite
in One Summer Worth $90.
Washington, Sept. 5.— importa
tion of a brigade of hop-toads to
|‘Sick on” hosts of army worms de
vastating capital lawns and shrub
I bery is the suggestion received by
the war department from a patriotic
New Jersey woman.
Gen. W. E. Chapman, superintend
ent of public grounds, refused to
I disclose the woman's name, but ad
mitted he was giving her sugges
tion serious considera ion. Sum
mer. the woman declared in her let
ter, is one long menu for toads,
changing to new insects and worm.'
almost weekly. She estimates a
toad's summer appetite ?o be worth
$90, and believes they could be edu
cated to esteem army worms as deli
cate tidbits.
___'j£_
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i/ •»» .. i »' t- »' r *■ t/ it' t' '•/ *' *
• j ••••••* • r. • • • • «
LATE MARKET REPORTS.
j. i*. y. ix ix ij. ix jji 'j. .x
Cattle.
Associated Press.
Kansas City. Mo., Sept. 5.-—Cat
tle, steady to strong; Southern
s eers, $4.40 to $6.50. Hogs, 5 to
10 cents lower: heavies $8.25 to
$8.40. Sheep, steady.
Cotton.
Associated Press.
New Orleans La., Sept. 5.—Cot
ton futures dosed steady with a net
decline of 1 to 5 points. Spo;s easy
and unchanged.
A washing machine manufac’urer
has just i-hjpped 25 machines to
Porto Rico. Judging from the news
paper pictures of the natives this
will overstock the market.—Cincin
nati Commercial Tribune.
•' _ •> " 1
ROOSEVELT DELIVERS
THREE SPEECHES
SPENDS DAY IN MINNEAPOLIS
AND ST. PAUL
Declares He is in Progressive Move
ment from S;andpoint of a Moral
ist than that of a Politician—Goes
to North Dakota.
Associated Press.
St. Paul, Minn., Sept. 5. Theo
dore Roosevelt spent he day in St
Paul and Minneapolis and delivered
three speeches. In his principal ad
dress at the Minnesota state fair, he
declared the nomination of Woodrow
Wilson was arranged by the demo
cratic bosses.
At Minneapolis he a'tended a
luncheon given by the Minne ota
progressive league, and gave his
views upon the significance of the
progressive movement from the
.-tandpoint of morals rather than of
the politician. "I am in :his move
ment," he said, “because it springs
as every great movement must, from
the conscience of the people."
He resumed his journey westward
tonight. His next s’op will be at
Grand Forks, X. D.
U. S. ENGINEER RICHE
COMING IN OCTOBER
Chamber of Commerce Through Sec
retary Whitney Seeks to Interest
Him in Brazos Santiago.
Lieut. Col. C. S. Riche. United
States district engineer at Galves
ton. will be in Brownsville about
October 1 "> for the purpose of inves
tigating conditions relative to water
tran-portation from Brownsville to
the gulf. This assurance was given
Secretary L. A. Whitney of the
Chamber of Commerce by Col. Riche
on a visit made to the engineer by
Mr. Whitney last Wednesday when
the latter was in Galveston. Mr.
Whitney states that he went over
the situation wi h Col. Riche and
explained the desire of the Chamber
of Commerce to secure water trans
portation to the Gulf of Mexico.
Maps and date compiled by the
Chamber of Commerce were shown
Col. Riche was taken over the pro
posed work in a thorough manner.
Mr. Whitney, in behalf of the
Chamber of Commerce, invited Col.
Riche to come to Brownsville in
order that he might he shown over
the field. The latter stated, how
ever, that it was impossible for him
to come here before October 15. He
promised several days of his time
very soon af’er that, and will notify
the local organization when he ex
pects to be here.
During his stay here he will be
entertained by the Chamber of Com
merce, the form of entertainment
yet 'o be determined upon.
“This matter,“ -aid Mr. Whitney
upon his return yesterday, “Is vital
to the whole interests of the Valley,
and the Chamber of Commerce will
appreciate any assistance that the
people of the Valley can give in plac
ing before the colonel the true
; situation.”
“TALKIEST” CONGRESS
EVER KNOWN
Completed Congressional Record Con
tains Fourteen Thousand Page*
and Twenty-S'x Million Words.
Washington, D. C., Sept. 5.—The
session of congress just closed has
been the “talkiest” in he history of
the government. The completed
congressional record of the session
will contain approximately 14,000
pages. It is the longest record of
Uhem all. Its nearest competitor
was that of the first session of the
fiftieth congress, whose members
delivered themselves of words suf
ficient to fill 9.616 pages. That ses
sion, however, lasted from December
until the following October 20. This
one adjourns in August and yet ver
bose statesmen have distanced the
oratorical feats of their predecessor;
of twenty-four years ago by miles
The record when completed will con
tain about 26,000,000 words, am
the nerves of the officials reporter
are somewhat frayed, In fact, thej
haven’t any nerves left.
GOLF GAMES
CONTINUED TODAY
Yesterday Travers Won Over Phelps
Keer Over Paul Hunter. Evans
Over Schmidt. Wood Over Hunter.
Associated Press.
Wheaton, 111., Sept. .1.—Jerome
Travers will play Hamilton Keer and
Charles Evans, jr., will play Warren
K. Wood omorrow in the simi-tinals
of the national amateur golf cham
pionship.
Travers won today over Mason
| Phelps. Kerr over Paul Hunter.
Evans over Schmidt, and Wood won
I by default, Norman F. Hunter, the
Edinburgh player, who has been hi
oponnent. being ill because of heat,
and was unable to play.
-o
4- • 4: 2££ „» 'Jl „ Ui «.
tv -i\ • .ix 7i\ r 7 1 i\ 1 ». » • •
*:■ FEDERAL GENERAL *
joins orozco
______
Mexico City, Mex., Sept.
-!- It is reported that General Jose -!*
de la Cruz Sanchez, a staunch
*1- Maderista, has gone over to
v Orozco at Ojinaga, with three -I
v thousand rifles and half a mil
•f lion rounds of amunition and
v two hundred men. This, it is -!
said, had been arranged and -!
K- was the object of Orozco’s my
terious march, after he evacu
I- ated Juarez. -I
*r V v v v v v v v v '* v v v
I. „
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AMERICAN FORCES MASTERS OF
THE SITUATION
Many Directing Heads of the Revolu
tion Captured — Americans and
Other Foreigners in No Danger.
Rebels Badly in Need of Money.
Associated Press.
Washington, D. C.. Sept .5.—(lov
er ntment success over the rebel
forces in several engagements In
4k !■"
Nicaragua, resulting in the capture
of a large number of the directing
heads of the revolution, together
with the almost complete domlni
tion of the situation by the American
naval forces now there, summed up
the situation in that Central Amer
ican republic today.
Reassuring advices were received
at the navy department from Admir
al Southerland regarding Matngalpa.
lie reports that the rumors of danger
to Americans and other foreigners
are greatly exaggerated.
The revolutionists are using every
means to obtain money, in many in
stances resorting to robbery and ex
tortion.
-*
More than 4,500,000 trees havw,
been planted by a big eastern raii-\^ ^
road in the last ten years to provide '
timber and for ornamental purposes.
SAN BENITO
THE
BIG CANAL TOWN
The ltvest and largest new town in Texas in the
LOWER RIO GRANDE VALLEY
San Benito has grown from nothing to over four thousand population In
four years and today offers best location for commercial and In
dustrial n ter prises in Southwest Texas. Natural advantage*
and improvements already rna do insure city of Importance.
The growth and development have only started.
NEARLY HALF A MILLION
dollars railn d business on St. Louis. Brownsville and Mexico Rail way
a San Benito, in one year. Sixty-seven jot com l-ereae* ov«; bi.«>r»-**
of previous year.
.'ear ending April 30th 1911 1912
Freight received 112,819.44 235,880.20
Freight forwarded 42,839.33 96,100.31
Express received 12.539.C4 15,426.23jHljHHDk
Express forwarded ls.09S.34 19,025.UH' iLo
Ticket sales 31,460.95 4 3,960^'' * ' 1,
Excess Baggage 292.21 478^|‘ \
Switching, storage, and
demurrage No record 3,204.11
Total Value of Business 248,050.95 414,075.65
Above represents only the amount paid to the St. L. B. ft M. for han^^^^H
ing business shown and NOT THE VALUE OF PRODUCTS HANDL]»HpjBj
EIGHTY THOUSAND ACRES OF RICH DELTA SOIL
irrigated from the big San Benito Canal surround the town of San
nito. Twenty-five thousand acres al ready in cultivation.
INTERURBAN RAILROAD NOW IN OPERATION V
over 40,000 acres of this tract serving every farm with con*enteQt^^^|
freight and express service. Extens ion being made on the balance
Hie tract. Rio Hondo, Santa Maria, (’arricltos, l.os Indios and La Ralomj^^^B
on interurban road out of San Benito. Convenient schedule.
IT WILL PAY YOU TO INVESTIGATE SAN BENITO V
before engaging in farming, commercial or industrial enterprises els*
where in Texas. *
SAN BENITO LAND & WATER COMPANY
SIN BENITO. TENS.
■ .. ■ . — " ■ ■ .. ■ .. 11 ... ■ 11 .. ...I.
Starting business in March, 1905, the price of ice wa* fixed at
30 cents a hundred pounds at the plant, 40 cents per hundred
pounds delivered, and the price has never been changed. This is a
record of which we are proud. Ice is sold lower in Brownsville
than in any ether city in Texas cf its size. All ice is made from
pure distilled water and is clean and wholesome.
Any amount delivered at any place in the city,
The company appreciates your business and support and will
continue its present policy of accommodation. Buy an ioe book
and save 5 per cent—i* is safe, as it is not transferable
' $. C. TUCKER, mm
1—:—

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