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Brownsville herald. [volume] (Brownsville, Tex.) 1910-current, September 20, 1912, Image 1

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PHOBIC FIRELESS COOKERS T|kTO¥ YY% W YT* V T T* A V -IL GRILLO - — ,
fo*t Sanitary and Convenient M B ^k a I^BI ^k ill I BchI B>4 Bl^r #Bk H a 5 Boils, Broil*, Frie* and Toa:il"“
OWNSVILLE HARDWARE jp_BM _ F ff j[^| f B ■ 1 ^ 1^1 jl JL Mild JLVlB YimA % BBOWNSVI^hSSdwIrE CO
VOL. XX. NO. 66. * BROWNSVILLE. TEXAS FRIDAY. SEPT. 20. 1912. PRICE FIVE CENTS.
SENOR DIDAPP TELLS
REMARKABLE STORY
SAYS AMERICANS FINANCED
REVOLUTION AGAINST DIAZ
Five Million Dollar* Advanced by
Charle* P. Taft. h. Clay Pierce,
and Harriman Interests. Who Re
ceived Twenty Million a* Premium
Associated Press.
New Orlean, La., Sept. 19.- Juan
P. Didapp, diplomatic adviser of the
Mexican revolution, declared here
today just before leaving for Mexico,
that Americans, including Charles
P. Taft, brother of the president,
Henry Clay Pierce and representa
tives of the Harriman interests, fur
nished money to Madero to finance
the revolution against Diaz.
He said five million dollars were
advanced and the loan was repaid
with twenty millions premium.
Senor Didapp reaffirmed the re
port that Washington officials had
sent an ultimatum to Madero that
the revolution must be put down
within thirty days.
He said the revolution would not
be shopped, "even if 1 have to lead
it myself,” he declared.
He added that a new junta would
be formed to replace that broken tip
through arrest f members by United
states offiers. (
-- -O-——
STRIKE OF MEXICAN
TEXTILE WORKERS
Mexico City, Mex., Sept. 19.—The
'textile workers of the states of
Tlaxcala and Puebla have gone on
strike because of the refusal of the
owners to grant an increase of
wages. A strike is also declared in
four mills in the federal district.
SLEEPER SERVICE
10 SAN ANTONIO
j Has Been Inaugurated—To be Op
erated Jointly by the Sap and the
Brownsville Road.
The noon train yesterday brought
in two sleepers, the additional one
being from San Antonio. Thus is
inaugurated the long hoped for
through sleeper service between this
city and San Antonio. The service
will be jointly operated by the St.
Louis, Brownsville & Mexico railroad
and the San Antonio and Aransas
Pass railroad, the exchange being ef
fected at Corpus Chriti.
; The new through sleeper will
j leave San Antonio each night at 9:20
j o’clock, arriving at Corpus Christi
at 4:50 in the morning. The
Brownsville Road will then take the
car, leaving Corpus Chriti at 5:30
p. m., and arriving in Brownsville
at 12:15 p. m.
From Brownsville to San Antonio
the schedule will be as follows:
la»ave Brownsville at 4 p. m. Arrive
at Corpus Christi at 10:10 p. m.
Leave Corpus Christi at 11:20 p. m.,
over the Sap, arriving at San An
tonio at 7:10 a. m.
That travelers between Browns
ville and San Antonio are pleased
with this improvement goes without
saying. It is being hailed with Joy.'
One staid old gentleman of Browns
ville, who expects soon to go to San
Antonio, when told at the station
yesterday afternoon of the new ser
vice, said with much gusto, ‘‘Hurrah,
that's fine!”
-o
The Swift and Armour packing
plants of Fort Worth are receiving
daily a total of 4 000 head of hogs*
from out of state points. Approxi
mately $350,000 is being sent out of
the state monthly to make the pur
chases.
— v. Phone The Elite Ice Cream Parlor
Number 188 For
VAL'L EY IC E CREAM
(We have purchased the Elite Ice Cream Parlor which enables us
to deliver our celebrated VALLEY ICE CREAM, SHERBETS and
ICES in Brownsville to the family trade, all nicely packed in ice,
at the following prices:
1-2 GALLON ORDERS . $ .75
1 GALLON ORDERS . 1.25
A trial will convince that our ice cream is superior to anything
you have had before. We make special reductions to religious and
civic societies.
SAN BENITO ICE CREAM & CREAMERY CO.
SAN BENITO. TEXAS.
a; as a. a- a. a. a. a. .iau 1 ± it: X X X J. X X X u: i: IL ±
7T • • .' ’' ” •' •
* While In the Valley *
M£ Mr
* DON’T FAIL TO VISIT *
ImissDonJ
* *
* Elevation, 14o feet.
I |
« Irrigation, unexcelled. *■
* _ *1
* Drainage, natural. *i
! WE PROVE IT
* Mr
Me j.
Me To be the most progressive, high
Me
* Iy developed, prosperous, thriv
u t Mr
ing proposition in the Lower Rio *
* Grande Valley. *
$ A oersonal inve? tigation will con- Me
4. ^
* vince you of the greater advan- *
tages and opportunities offered.
: MISSION UNO IMPROVEMENT COMPANY ;
* % I > [ MISSION, TEXAS *
i JOHN J. CONWAY \ jjj
* Preiidtat ¥ Sole Owner \ Me
Me l *
************ ******* *************
1H0 WITNESSES
FI TO APPEAR
TO TESTIFY IN WATERS PIERCE
CASE
Untermeyer* Coun*el for Water*
Pierce* Declares Di*solution of
Standard Oil Was a Farce—Veit
Director on Stand.
Associated Press.
New York, Sept. 10.—Two wit
nesses, C. M. Higgens and \V. Ft.
King, directors of the Standard Oil
company of New York, are wanted
by counsel for the Waters Pierce Oil
company in defending the action
brought by the Standard Oil com
pany, to obiain control of the Waters
Pierce, concern, can not he found,
as was developed in the taking of
testimony today.
Samuel Fntermeyer, counsel for
Waters Pierce, is anxious to examine
them to determine to what extent
the Standard Oil company of New’
York complied, with other compan
ies, in the dissolution of the Stand
ard Oil company of New .Jersey.
ITntermeyer contends that the dis
solution was a farce.
R. 0. Veit, secretary of the Stand-'
ard of New’ York, described the i
men as the ones who solicited busi
ness for that company in competi
tion with the Standard Oil com
panies of Ohio and Indiana.
Veit was asked wso suggested the
New York transported oil on the
C.reat Lakes for the Standard com-1
pany of Indiana and the Imperial
Oil company, limited, of Canada,
both formerly controlled by the dis
solved corporation.
Veit said his concern had no oil to
transport on the Lakes.
Veit wms asked ■vho suggested the
names of the officers of his company.
Ho said he could not remember. As
*o the salary of the president, H. C.
Folger, said he did not feel inter
ested enough to know’. He did not
feelt, as a director of the company,
that it was his business to know a?
to the salaries of its officers.
_NJ/_
RAISING FINDS FOB
DEMOCRATIC CAMPAIGN
Woodrow Wilson Club Collected
Small Sum La^t Night—Frank
Rabb Appointed to Tour Valley.
At the meeting of the Woodrow
Wilson Club ar the federal court
room last night, $.">9.."0 in cash was
collected for the benefit of the demo
cratic national campaign fund. The
money will be sent to Hon. Cato
Sells of Cleburne, national commit
teeman from Texas, by whom it will
lie transferred to national head
quarters at New York City.
Frank Rabb, W. A. Rutledge,
George Scanlan, Teofllo Crixell and
Mr. Tarnajo were appointed a com.
mittee to call on all the members of
the club who have not yet con
tributed, and secure their contribu
tions. Upon motion, Mr. Rabb was
appointed to make a tour of the
Valley towns in the interest of the
democratic campaign fund. He and
M. J. Slattery will probably leave
on the trip today.
An effort will he made to wind
up the subscriptions within the next
week. It is not probable that any
more meetings of the club will be
held, but it will remain intact un'il
, Woodrow Wilson is elected—or de
feated.
A letter to Mr. Rabb from Judge
Sells was read before the meeting,
in which Mr Sells states that it is
enMrelv possible to raise $.">0,000 in
Texas, and that the larger cities of
the state, Dallas, Fort Worth, San
i Antonio and Houston, have agreed to
raise $3000 each. He also asks if
the committee can not expect several
hundred dollars from Brownsville.
I
PRESIDENT FAVORS
BUDGET SYSTEM
Says United States is Only Great
Nation in *he World With No An
nual Budge*.
^Associated Press.
,1 -Beverly. Mass., Sept. T9.—Presi
dent Taft tonight made public a let
;■ ter to Secre'ary of the Treasury Mac
- Veigh, taking open issue with con
i gress on the question of the federal
budget, and directing all the beads
• v* ■«;;
of government departments to make
estimates of the revenue and ex
penditure* for the fiscal year, in con
formity with the budget plan.
The president declares in his let
ter that a proposition in one of the
big supply bills, passed by congres
at the closing hours of the last ses
sion has practically forbidden the
budget system as unconstitutional,
t He said no other great nation
was withoui the budget system and
scored congress because of the effort
made to prevent it.
WOMAN ARRESTED FOR
HIDING RECOODS
I
, OFFICIALS OF INDIAN OFFICE
MAKE COMPLAINT
■ ■ ■
j |
Mrs, Helen Pierce Gray. Who Fig
ured Prominenfly in Investigation
of Crow Indiri Affairs. Charg'd
W’ith Concealing Public Records.
Associated Press.
1 Washing on, D. C„ Sept. 19.—
Mr-. Helen Pierce Gray, who as in
vestigator of (’row Indian affairs for
the Graham committee of the house
was the cen;er df stormy scenes at
the last session of congress, was ar
rested today on complaint of the In
dian office, and charged with con
cealing public records.
She was released under $.',00 cash
bail, furnished by Senator Clapp of
Minnesota.
Her trial befor< the Cnited State
commissioner is s >t for Tuesday.
Mrs. Gray, whrfi arraigned today,
declared the papers in question were
taken by her from the Indian, office
with the consent of Indian Commis
sioner Valine and Judge M. C.
Humes of the attorney general's of
fice, and turned over to the depart
ment of justice that they might he
saved from destruction and used a:
evidence in the proposed investiga
tion before the senate committee o’
Indian affairs.
_v
GIT CRACKER COSTS
GIRL’S RIGHT HARD
Marian Flore* Held Lighted Crackei
Too Long and it Exploded. Tear
ing Her Hand *o Pieces.
Marina Flores, a Mexican girl 2T
years old, *ost her right hand at 9:31
la3t night as the result of the ex
plosion of a lighted cannon cracker
which exploded in her hand. Th<
accident happened at the alleyway
facing on 13th street, betweer
Washington and Adams. The youn*
woman was conveyed to the Ri<
.Grande hospital, where she was at
I tended by Dr. H. K. Loew and Dr
IH. L. D. Kirkham.
Te girl, who live- in Matamoros
i is employed at the residence of R. I,
Gain, near the corner of Washing
ton and 13th streets. While clean
ing house yesterday she found two
huge cannon crackers, each fully :
foot long, on top of a wardrobe
They had been hidden there out o'
reach of Mr. Cain's little boy, morr
than a year ago, and were forgotten
Marina, with two of her sister
one of them also employed at th*
same place, went to the end of th<
alleyway last night to fire off the
crackers. After applying the lighter
match to the first one she held i'
'too long, and it exploded in he;
hand.
The girl’s hand was fearfully
mangled. All the fingers were hang
ing by sherds of flesh and skin, am’
both the palm and the hark of the
hand were laid bare to the bone.
As soon as the accident occurred
the girl was taken to the resident
of Dr. Voew, also occupied by Mr
Cain's family where she was givpr
temporary relief. Within half an
hour, she was taken o the hospital
It was found necessary to amputatr
the shattered hand, which was done
a short time after she reached the
hospital. At midnight the you nr
woman was repor’ed to be resting
easily, and doing as well as could bf
expected.
The report of the explcdinp
cracker was heard within a radius
of several blocks. It caused much ex
citement, and people hurried to the
scene from all directions, chief or
Police R. J. Tucker took possession
oj the second cracker.
-o
lt‘s queer how suddenly some men
become total abstainers when it's
their treat.
HOW TO FIGHT
| THE EOLL WEEVIL
FRISCO EXPERT GIVES FARMERS
GOOD ADVICE
Oklahoma Has Almo*t Exterminated
the Pest by Following Mr. Dial’*
i Direc*ions—Messrs. Sprague and
Wa*ers Gave Interesting Talks.

Hardy Dial, lecturer for the
| Frisco system, who gave the main
address to a large gathering of
[farmers at the Little Indiana school;
house Wednesday night, in thej
course of his lecture, said that he)
believed that by cu ting all of the
standing cotton in the field and
burning these cut stalks which had
been placed hi windrows and by
later planting iir the spring, the cot
ton farmers of the Valley would ge
rid of at least ninety per cent of the
boll weevil pest which has ravaged
their cotton fields so unmercifully
this year.
In the beginning of his lecture,
Mr. Dial said that he had been a«ked
by B. F. Yoakum, head of the Frisco
System, to come to the Valley and
take up with the farmers here a
plan for combating the boll weevil,
and that Mr. Yoakum had further
said if enough interest was shown
in the trying out of methods to that
end he would employ Mr. Dial in the
capacity of organizer and advisor to
the farmers for the forthcoming
vear. Mr. Dial in speaking of the
no-sibility of his taking up the fight
with the farmers this next year, said
that he would want to shoulder al!
the responsiblity of any advice ir
regards to seed, planting, cultiva
Hon, ect., which he might give to
the farmers.
The expert said that from his ob
servations and what he had learned
rom the farmers he believed the
rreatly increased number of weevil
n the fields this season was due to
'he heavy rains which fell early ir
‘he growing season and the failure
on the part of the growers to out
down the perennial plants starting
!n the early spring. These perennial
nlants afford the very young weevil
"oming out of its winter hibernating
a safe protection and pasturage,
until the new cotton attains suf
ficient growth to protect the delicate
:nsect from the sun’s rays.
The best method to be used in
clearing the fields of cotton stalks in
he fall, Mr. Dial believes, would be
fhe placing of all the fallen stalks
•n “green rows.” or narrow* rows of
talks left standing, and by leaving
this green food for feeding purposes
the boll w'eevil will collect there and
'•ould later easily be burned and
killed. By this comparatively sim
ole method Mr. Dial, as quoted
ibove, said that he was sure fully
seventy-five per cent of the entire
fribe of boll weevills would he de
troy ed.
Jle assured his hearers that,
roughly, ninety per. cent of the boll
weevils could be killed by the burn
ing of the stalk.? and late planting
in the spring. He said that it had
been satisfactorily demonstrated in
Oklahoma that, simply by concerted
ic'ion on the part of all the growers
in a section in the matter of burn
ing all standing cotton stalks in the
fall, the number of weevils were re
duced seventy-five per cent, while,
if the twenty-five per cent remain
ing at least fifteen per cent, it has
been found, die in the hibernating
stage being unable to withstand the
winter. By late planting, for in
stance from March 1 to 13, the
weevils living through the winter
and coming out in the spring w’ould
have little or no young cotton upon
which to subsist.
Method* of Cultivation.
Going into the methods of prepa
ration of the soil, cultivation and
selection of seed, Mr. Dial said that
the soil should be broken and pre
nared at least four months before
planting of the seed and that he be
lieved that most of the growers of [
cotton upon irrigated lands were j
wont ro irrigate too much and to cul- !
tivate too little. No water,, he be
lieves, should be used after the
plants have started to grow well.
> About one-fourth of the produc
tion of a field of cotton is lost by thp
poor selection of seed, he said, and
all seed placed in the ground should
first he graded. Another source of
| loss to the farmer is at the time of
chopping out, when the stalk be
comes more or less injured by the
hoe in the hands of the laborer and
right then should he send a drag of
some description through the rows
«► j
(Continued on page four.)
TRUSTS FLOURISHED
UNDERKEVELT
In Speech Yesterday Wilson Said
Trust* Flourished Under Roose
velt More than any Admini*tra*ion
Associated Press.
Detroit, Mich., Sept. 10.—Trusts
flourished more under former Pres
ident Roosevelt's administration
than any other in history. This
was the way Governor Woodrow Wil
son replied in a speech here tonight,
to the assertion of Roose\elt yester
day, taking exception to Wilson’s
declaration that during the recent
investigation by the house Messrs.
Gary and Perkins suggested a plank
in the progressive platform propos
ing a federal commission to regulate
the trusts.
OROZCO MOVES
TOWARD EAGLE PASS
Reported that Rebel Leader Will
Make Ciudad Porfiro Diaz His
Objective Point.
Associated Press. /
El Paso, Tex., Sept. lfl.—Accord
ing to information received at rebel
headquarters here today, l’ascual
Orozco, jr.f will make the town of
Ciudad Porfiro Diaz, opposite Eagle
Pass, Texas, his objective point. He
is reported to have mobilized a force
of twelve hundred men and is now
with them at Coahuila state line.
OROZCO'S DAUGHTER
WRITES TO TIH
Begs President Not to Let Her
Grandfather Fall Into the Hands
of President Madero.
Associated Press, j
l*os Angeles. <*a! , Sept. 19.—Fear
ful lest her grandfather, Pascual
Orozco, sr., may fall into the hands
of Madero, Elena Orozco, one of the
several daughters of Pascual Orozco,
jr., wrote this letter to President
Taft:
“Dear Mr. President Taft—
“Mv papa is not a murderer. He
is a brave soldier fighting for his
country. Please don't let American
soldiers give my grandfather to Mr.
Madero, for Mr. Madero would shoot
him. And that would just kill poor
grandmother."
The wife of Orozco, sr., is serious
ly ill with nervous breakdown here.
GEN. HUERTA PLANS
TO HEM OROZCO
Jaurez, Mex., Sept. 19.—General
Huerta with eight hundred federals,
left today for the southwest. It is
reported that he plans to hem tn the
rebels under Orozco.
.
SAN BENITO
THE
BIG CANAL TOWN
The livest and largest new town in Texas in the
LOWER RIO GRANDE VALLEY
San Benito has grown from nothing to over four thousand population In
four years and today offers best location for commercial and In
dustrial nterprir.es in Southwest Texas. Natural advantages
and improvements already ma de insure city cf Importance.
The growth and development have only started.
NEARLY HALF A MILLION
Dollars railrt d business on St. Louis, Brownsville and Mexico Railway
at San Benito, in one year. Sixty-seven per ceti' 1-crease over buttlne**
of previous year.
•rear ending April 30th 1911 1912 >
Freight received 112,819.44 235,880.20
Freight forwarded 42,839.33 96,100.31
Express received 12,539.64 15,4 26.23
Express forwarded 18,098.34 19,025 44
Ticket sales 31,460.95 43,960.66
Excess Baggage 292.25 478.70
Switching, storage, and
demurrage No record 3,204.11
Total Value of Business 248,050.95 414,075.65
Above represents only the amount paid to the St. L. B. & M. for hand
ling business shown and NOT THE VALUE OF PRODUCTS HANDLED.
EIGHTY THOUSAND AG DF RICH DELTA SOIL
Irrigated from the big San Benito Canal surround the town of San Be
nito. Twenty-five thousand acres al ready In cultivation.
INTERURBAN RAILROAD NOW IN OPERATION
over 40,000 acres of this tract serving every farm with convenient
freight and express service. Extens ion being made on the balance of
the tract. Rio Hondo, Santa Maria, Carrlcltos, Ix>s indios and La Paloma
on interurban road out of San Benito. Convenient schedule.
IT WILL PAY YOU TO INVESTIGATE SAN BENITO
before engaging In farming, commercial or Industrial enterprises else
where in Texas.
SAN BENITO UNO & WATER COMPANY.
SAN, BENITO. TEXAS.
—1' - -t-f '
rnmmrnmmm
KO - PRES - KO - KAKE
Means Profit and Economy
TO CATTLE FEEDERS
Call at ourKew Oil Mill and let us convince you.
First 50000 pounds sold to T. J. La*son.
of this city.
We continue to manufacture the
best Ice obtainable.
PEOPLES ICE AND MANUFACTURING CO.
-4
I

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