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Brownsville herald. [volume] (Brownsville, Tex.) 1910-current, September 21, 1912, Image 1

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suss. RROWNSVII .1 F. HERALD -«*»-•
U1VV/ f f 1 lU V " a -•■ 4m j A JIA^AV/jLJLjiI^* Brownsville hardware c. •■ V,
VOL. XX. NO. 67. _. BROWNSVILLE. TEXAS SATURDAY, SEPT. 21, 1912. PRICE FIVE CENTS.
AMERICAN MARINES
HGHT WITH REBELS
DETAILS OF AFFAIR NOT FULLY
KNOWN
Reported that Blue Jackets Were
Fired Upon by Nicaraguan Rebel*
While Trying to Relieve Famine
Threatened City oil Granada.
m » —— m
Associated Press
Washington, D. C., Sept. 20.—
Severe fighting between the Ameri
can naval forces and the Nicaragua
revolutionists is believed to have oc
cured in the past few days near
Barrancas. Reports from the scene
are meagre, however, and the of
ficials here are without definite in
formation other than that the Amer
ican blue jackets were fired upon
several days ago.
A force of two thousand marines
started toward the famine-threaten
ed city of Granada a week ago, and
if their plans have not miscarried
the route of the National railway has
been cleared of rebels and the rail
way will be reopened.
The British consul general at
Managua has reported the killing of
two British subjects at Achuaba. It
is expected, however, that the Brit
ish government will take no action
pending the result of the American
campaigns.
-o
AVIATOR BLAIR KILLED
YESTERDAY IN IOWA
Associated Press.
Shenandoah, la., Sept. 20.—Rus
sell Blair, an aviator of Kansas City,
while making an exhibition flight
here today, fell thirty feet and was
killed. Blair had just made a suc
cessful flight and landed. When he
attempted to fly again the machine
struck an air current and turned
•turtle. He was pinned under the
wreckage, and his head was crushed
by the engine.
As a general thing the man who
borrows the most trouble is <the fel
low who has lent a lot of money.
1 3f the statistics were available j
probably it would be found thaf on
the average it takes about three
months after a girl declines to marry
a man for him to get glad of it.
MYSTERIOUS LOSS
OF MONEY PACKAGE
FIFTY-FIVE THOUSAND DOLLARS
LOST IN TRANSIT
« _

Money Intened for Pay Roll of Louis
ville and Nashville Railroad Fail*
*o Reach Destination—Package
Filled With Magazine Leaves.
Associated Press.
Pensacola. Fla., Sept. 20.—A pack
age containing fifty-five thousand
dollars mysteriously disappeared in
transit, from the First National bank
of this city to the officials of the
Louisville and Nashville railroad at
Floamaton, Ala.
1 The money was part of seventy-;
five thouand dollars intended as 'he
pay roll and was in bills of small
denomination.
The robbery occurred Wednesday
but the details did not become pub- i
lie until today. Reports are current
that the Louisville and Nashville
train was held up near here Wed
nesday, but this is emphatically de
nied by the railroad officials.
The money was put in the pack- !
ages at the bank and sealed. On
being opened by the railroad officials, i
it is said that one package supposed
to contain fifty-five thousand dollars i
was found to contain pages from a ;
magazine. The express messengers |
avow that the seals of the package i
were not broken while in their
custody.
-*
ANTONIO ROJAS WILL
ATTACK AGUA PRIETA
Associated Press.
Douglas, Ariz., Sept. 20.—General '
Antonio Rojas, who is reported to
have twelve hundred men in his
command, twelve miles south of
Agua Prieta, sen*t word to the fed
eral commander that he would at
tack Agua Prieta within a few days,
with twenty-four hundred men.
*»T
There are some women who don’t
even say “Get thee behind me,
Sa»tan,” until they have looked at
their back in the mirror.
-o
No wonder Eve was restless in !
Eden. There wasn’t a thing for her
to gossip about except snake tracks I
under the apple tree.
__
WHEN YOU NEED
REFRESHMENT
Try “VALLEY” -ICE CREAM OR
SHERBETS. Melts in your mouth,
yet cools you all over, gives zest to j
a jaded appetite and sends you on
your way freshened up and rejoicing.
Fine for home consumption, too.
Delivered packed in ice at the fol
lowing prices.
ONE-HALF GALLON • • • $ .75
ONE GALLON . 1.25
In Brick (plain or fancy) 50c each
ELITE CONFECTIONERY. PHONE
58.
*******************************
i While In the Valley *
* rf
* DON’T FAIL TO VISIT *
Emission. 1
* *
* *
* Elevation, 14 o feet. *
*
* Irrigation, unexcelled. *
* Hr
* Drainage, natural. *
I WE PROVE IT I
* 2
* *
* To be the most progressive, high
* *
* !y developed, prosperous, thriv- *
ing proposition in the Lower Rio
* Grande Valley. *
* A personal investigation will con- *
— * vince you of the greater advan
* tages and opportunities offered. *
i MISSION UNO IMPROVEMENT COMPAHY !
* MISSION, TEXAS
1 JOHN J. CONWAY
President V Sole Owner
*
*
****************&- *********
grantees
. r-^- h1' i
WHY THE COLONEL
LEFHHE PARTY
WOULD REFORM ROSEWATER
WITH A CLUB
Delegate* to Republican Convention
Stolen as Completely as if Thrown
Out—Scoffs at Idea of Reforming
Republican Party from Within.
" »
Associated Press.
Omaha. Neb., Sept. 20.—Theodore
Roosevelt traveled leisurely through
Nebraska today with a speech at
every stop.
iA»t Lincoln he defended his action
in quitting the republican party.
“Victor Rosewater, the former
republican national committeeman, '
he s«id, “stole the delegates to the
republican national convention, just
effectively as if they had been thrown
out.”
“It has been said,” he continued,
‘Of course, this is bad, but you
should stay In the party and reform
it.’ The only way to reform that
kind of man is with a club.
Roosevelt charged the republican
national committee with seating men
who were beaten at the primaries.
/“That committee,” he declared,
“is the one which will handle the
national convention in 1916. They
are already behaving worse than
they have behaved before, and to be
able to behave worse than tha
shows almost genius.”
Turning to the criticism of the
democrats, he said, that beyond the
charges that the progressives stole
'their issues from the democratic
platform and avowed he would not
have it as a gift.
Drive Off Overseer and Secure Casli
Booty to ‘he moun‘ of Four
Thousand Dollars.
Associated Press.
Mexico City, Mex., Sept., 20.—
The recent sacking of the ranch or
'the American, Rothchilds, near La
guna. by rebels, was reported of
ficially today.
The raiders drove off the manager
and secured about four thousand
dollars.
The rebels are reported as operat
ing in large numbers in the northern
part of the state of Michocan.
Reniforcemcnts were sent to (Jen.
Trevino at Monterrey today. It is
understood that Trevino will conduct
a campaign against the rebels in
Coahuila, where Orozco is supposed
to be.
_'»/_
REBELS AND FEDERALS
FIGHT YESTERDAY
Rebel* Apparently Ge* *he Worst of
it and Retreat We*tward Under
Command of Salazar.
Associated Press.
Douglas, Ariz., Sept. 20.—Official
reports of a battle between the rebels
and federals 27 miles south of here
yesterday, were received here ’oday
and gave the rebel loss at 20 killed
and 35 wounded.
The federal loss was 9 killed and
16 wounded. The rebels, under
Ynez SaSlazar, are said to have
withdrawn to the west after the
battle.
Record Wh«‘at Sale.
Temple, Tex., Sept. 20.—The
largest wheat sale ever recorded in
Bell county was made a few days
ago when C. W. Barr and Son pur
chased four thousand bushels from
W. A. Grimes. The price paid was
one dollar per bushel.
-*
Texa* City Canal.
Galveston, Tex., Sept. 20.—The
government dredge Col. A. M. Miller
has started work on the redredging
of the Texas City channel. It is'es
timated that 1,700,000 cubic yards
will have to be removed in order to
attain the twenty-five feet depth that
the channel will be wrhen completed.
• .
Patriotism and Granite.
Davis, Tex., Sept. 20.—Patriotism
for Texas prompted Earnest Marshall
of this place to offer, gratis, to the
government enough of the world's
finest granite quarried here to biuld
the federal bulding at 'Austin.
Burkburnett Bank.
Burkburnett, Tex., Sept. 20.—
[Papers have been received from the
state department of banking, author
izing the organization of a new state
[bank at Burkburnett, JNvith a capital
stock of $25,000. ^
a
B • i
HIGH LIVING COSI
THEJEIL ISSUE
WILSON SAYS HIS OPPONENTS
EVADE SUBJECT
Both G. 0. P. and Third Party Hav*‘
Abandoned thi* I*sue Because it
Involves “Bi* Bu*iness*’ Interests
| and the Tariff.
Associated Presk
Columbus O., Sept. 20.—Governor
Wilson participated in the formal
opening of the democratic campaign
in Ohio here today.
He had luncheon with Governor
Judson Harmon and the state leaders
and held a series of receptions and
made several speeches.
He^started back to Seagirt to
night after his first week of conse
cutive campaigning.
The governor made speeches on
education, as well as politic?. In
one he drew attention to the spec
ialties and d'.strictions of university
prominently his criticism of a board
l|fe. In another there stood out
of experts to handle the tariff and
trust problems.
Also he made his first reference
to the present currency sytem, and
characterized it as stiff, antiquated
and inelastic.
At Columbus 'today Governor
Woodrow- Wilson's speech in greatei
part, was devoted to high prices and
their cause. He said the leaders of
the republican and progressive par
ties were abandoning this i?su(
which is the central one of the cam
paign. An analysis of “big busi
ness” as assisted by the protective
tariff was made by the speaker, whr
said in part:
“The leaders of the republicai
party and the leaders of the third
party have astonished the whol<
country by practically abandonin'
any serious attempt to meet th»
main issues of the campaign. Th<
leaders of the third party, in par
ticular, interest u? anew every da
by seeking new- issues and shiftin'
the ground of debate. At the out
set they declared that the real issu
of the present contest was the higl
cost of living, but they have lai*
less and less amphasis upon that, be
cause they have seen that they ca’
not seriously attack that ques ioi
without attacking the question o
the tariff and of the truets in a ven
different way from that in w’hicl
they are actually approaching them
“Both the republican party an<
the third party subscribe explicitl;
and ardently to the principle of pro
tection. They admit that there ar*
defects in practice, that some dutie
are too high, that some extortation
have resulted from some schedule
of the tariff, but while they art
are ready to tinker, they are no
ready to alter in any essential par
ticular the system which special ad
vantages and privileges in industry
have been built up in this country
They stand for the system, and ii
their embarrassment declare tha'
the tariff is not the cause of high
prices, at any rate not the chic
cause.
“They are very vague about wha
the chief cause is, because as a mat ;
ter of fact the chief cause is thi j
manipulation of prices by the trut- ;
And they are tender also toward
the trusts. They know- that tlr
trusts practice monopoly, that mo
nopoly was the object of the trusts:
but they throw up their hands ii
despair when it is suggested tha:
monopoly may be destroyed, and re
ply, ‘No, it is very unfortunate, but j
it has come to stay. Business now
adays must be big. It can’t be bi
in any one industry without con j
trolling and control must mean mac
tery of the markets. This is tht
only way of efficiency, and we wil
not stand in the way of efficient'}
in modern business.’
“The railroads, we all admit, art
in their nature monopolistic. Wt
accepted that fact when we bega;
to regulate them. Every economist
(Continued on page tour.)
vt^ \«r tl/ xt/
IN 'l“ 7T 71n 7Tn 71s 7|\ 7fN ss* /In S%\ SW\ '•
UTE MARKET REPORTS.
j«K******X***£S*
Cotton.
Associated Press.
New Orleans I^a., Sept. 20.—Cot
ton futures closed steady with a nei
advance of 5 to 8 points. Spots
steady and 1-16 up.
Cattle.
Associated Press.
Kansas City, Mo., Sent. 20.—Cat
tle ruled steady to weak today; ex
port steers, $8.40'tp $10.75. Hors.
10 cents higher; hjpavies quoted at
$S.40 to $8.60. Shfctep steady.
Adam had a oiloplv as a world
ruler—until Eve^»>utted in and j
spoiled the gam<:,*®"-x.
Waurice. - . ^ \
I1TTEE. TBp ls sure a sood oue* com'
- sf
VETERAN SOLDIER
VISITS BROWNSVILLE
...
WITNESSED THE DEATH OF
MAJOR BROWN
Major Pruyn of Baton Rouge* Came
to the Rio Grande With Taylor in
1S46—Was in Fort Brown During
Bombardment.
In Major R. L. Pruyn of Baton
Rouge, La., Brownsville has today,
as its guest, one of the only two sur
vivors, so far as known, of the siege
and bombardment of old Fort Brown
by the Mexican forces in 184 6, at
the beginning of the war with Mex
ico, sixty-six years ago.
The major came to see once more
the scene of the beginning of the
struggle that confirmed to Texas the
title to that slice of territory lying
between the Rio Grande and Nueces
rivers, and gave to the United States
California, Nevada, Utah, New Mex
ico and Arizona.
The major says that to the best of
his recollection there was not at that
time a house on the present site of
•he city of Brownsville.
Considering his age—he is eighty
one years old—Major Pruyn is still
able to get around in a very energetic i
manner. Mr. Pruyn came to Texas
when he was less than f *een years
old, with General Zachr y Taylor.
He was a member of the Seventh
United States Infantry, commanded
by Major Brown, after whom Fort
Brown is named, and was within
twenty feet of the major when he!
received a shell in the leg, shatter
ing the limb, causing its amputation
and later resulting in his death.
Major Brown was wi-thin the fort
when he was struck by the shell.
Major Pruyn is also a veteran of
the civil war, having served the Con
federacy as a member of General
Maxev’s regiment, the Fourth Louis
iana. He has the honor of being the
only man who ever left Fort Hu<|
son, about twenty-five miles up the
Mississippi river from Baton Rouge,
with despatches, who returned to the
fort alive.
A party composed of Col. D. P. |
Gay, R. C .Wharton, C. H. More and
Henry Gay accompanied Major
Pruyn in an automobile to the site !
jf old Fort Brown yesterday after- j
noon. The for: is located less than
a quarter of a mile south of what is
now know as Fort Brown.
Major Pruyn could hardly recog
nize the old embankments, which
“still remain intact, because of the
almost impenetrable undergrowth,
brush and small trees, some of them
ten and -twelve feet high. Owing to
these conditions he could not get his
bearings, except as to the location of
the interior of the fort, where he
and his fellow warriors were during
the siege. The fort, he said, was
about 150 fee“t square and there was
a regiment of soldiers within Us
walls.
At that time there were no trees
or brush and there was no difficulty
In seeing across the river. The major
recalled the fact that there were two
forts on the Mexican side, both
diagonally across from the Texas
fort. The lower one was silenced by
the United States guns within an
hour and a half but the upper one
continued -the siege for ten or twelve
days. Most of the shells sent in this
direction, he said, splashed into a
lagoon back of the fort, some of them
exploding and some not.
When the Mexicans were finally
forced to withdraw from their:
stronghold .The Uni'ed States troops
advanced to Cerrogordo and to Mon
terrey, where they remained until
peace was declared.
. Major Pruyn al?o recalled that
during the first few days of the
siege handkerchiefs were waved
from a building across the river, al
most continually. Guns were turned
in that direction, and the flirting of
the handkerchiefs soon disappeared.
Shortly after the declaration of
peace, or in 1849, Major Pruyn
went to Baton Rouge to make his
home and has resided there since
that time. He is a nativd of New
York city, leaving “there shortly be
fore he joined General Taylor's reg
iment.
Major Pduyn expects to remain
here a week or ten days, and will
visit various points of interest dur
ing his stay. (%jl. Gay will take him
over the river to see the old fort;
there.
Forec^t.
Associated Press.
Washington, D.i {’., Sept. 20.—
West Texas—Fair Saturday and
cooler in the extreme south: Sun
day fair. East Te^is—Fair in the
north and probably howers in the
south Saturday and -ooler; Sunday
fair and cooler near e coast.
; and see j s
(
TURNED LOOSE
UNO RE-ARRESTED
Elder Orozco and Fellow Prisoners
Released by Commissioner, but
ar«“ Immediately Rearres*ed.
Associated Press.
Marfa, Tex., Sept. 20.—Colonel
Pascual Orozco, sr., and his five
companions, advisers of Pascual
Orozco, jr., leader of the Mexican
rebels in the north, who were cap
tured at Presidio recently, were
found not guilty of the charge of
neutrality law violations, at a hear
ing before United States Commis
sioner Griffin today, and w'ere dis
charged.
Orozco, sr., and Jose Cordeva
Saenz, however, were immediately
rearrested by complaint of Mexican
Consul Llorente at El Paso. An ef
fort will be made to extradite Mem
by Mexico on a charge cf murder.
They will be taken to El Paso for
a hearing.
General Orozco, jr., is reported .'»0
miles south of Ojinaga, at the head
of a thousand men. Truck Aubert
and a force of federals are still at
Ojinaga.
-o
About the only way to make a
woman happy is to get her every
thing she wants and then get her
everything the other women want.
Moreover, a girl is a person who
thinks her floppy Panama hat is
pretty even after she has seen how
floppy Panamas look on other girls.
NEW RECORDS IN
AMATEM ATHLETICS
Record Broken in Hop, Step and
Jump and in Discus Throwing, in
Junior Events.
| _ .
Associated Press.
Philadelphia, Pa., Sept. 20.—Two
new records were established and
others equalled today in the junior
athletic events held uuder the
auspices of the Amatelur Athletic
Union at Fordes Field.
E. McCarty of the Irish Athletic
Club of New York city, made a new
junior record of the hop, step and
jump, with a mark of 45 feet and
9 Inches.
K Muller of the tame organization,
threw a discus 116.9 feet, a new
record. The New York Athletic club
won the first honors with a dash *
with 53 points. The Irish American
team wa; second with 30 points.
The senior events will take place
tomorrow. Athletes from all parts of
the country are coming to take part.
-o
Race Course Dangerou”.
Associated Press.
Milwaukee, Wis., Sept. 20.—Con
tinued rainy weather has made the
course over which -the Vanderbilt
cup auto races are scheduled to run
tomorrow dangerous, and doubt is
expressed tonight whether the race
will be run.
SAN BENITO
THE
BIG CANAL TOWN
The livest and largest new town in Texas in the
LOWER RIO GRANDE VALLEY
San Benito has grows from nothing to over four thousand population la
four years and today offers best location for commercial and In
dustrial nterprises in Southwest Texas. Natural advantages
and improvements already ma de insure < ity of importance.
The growth and development have only started.
NEARLY HALF A MILLION
Dollars railrc d business on St. Louis, Brownsville and Mexico Railway
at San Beniio, in one year. Sixty-seven per cent U.rcase over business
of previous year. • .
Vear ending April 30th 1011 1912
Freight received 142,819.44 235,880.20
Freight forwarded 42,839.33 96,100.31
Express received 12,539.64 15,426.23
Express forwarded 18,098.34 19,025.44
Ticket sales 31,460.95 43,960.66
Excess Baggage 292.25 478.70
Switching, storage, and
demurrage No record 3,204.11
Total Value of Business 248,050.95 414,075.65
Above represents only the amount paid to the St. L. B. A M. for hand
ling business shown and NOT THE VALUE OF PRODUCTS HANDLED.
EIGHTY THOUSAND ACRES OF RICH DELTA SOIL
irrigated from the big San Benito Canal surround the town of 3an Be
nito. Twenty-five thousand acres al ready in cultivation.
INTERURBAN RAILROAD NOW IN OPERATION
over 40,000 acres of this tract serving every farm with convenient
freight and express service. Extens ion being made on the balance of
the tract. Rio Hondo, Santa Maria, Carricitos, Los Indios and La Paloma
on interurban road out of San Benito. Convenient schedule.
IT WILL PAY YOU TO INVESTIGATE SAN BENITO
before engaging in farming, commercial or industrial enterprises else
whppp in Tpyhsi
SAN BENITO LAND & WATER COMPANY.
' SIN BENITO. TEXAS.
KO - PRES ■ KO - KAKE
Means Profit and Economy
TO CATTLE FEEDERS
Call at our New Oil Mill and let us convince you.
First 50000 pounds sold to T. J. Lawson,
of this city.
We continue to manufacture the
best !ce obtainable. _
ujc w utxi ana
PEOPLES ICE AND MANUFACTURE™"
______ ^ -.IDES SANCHEZ
7\ 4
m, .

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