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Brownsville herald. [volume] (Brownsville, Tex.) 1910-current, September 23, 1912, Image 2

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BBOWBSVILLE DAILY HERALD
bwnsville Herald Publishing Co.
Tesse Wheeler . Editor
3. Slattery.Manager
'1 f- ■
flcl^l Organ of Cameron County ,
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Consolidated In 1893 with the Dally j
Cosmopolitan, which was pub-;
llshed In Brownsville for 16 years.
I
Terms of Subscription
l>ally—Published every morning
except Sunday, by mail postpaid to
any point In the United States, Mex
ico or Cuba or delivered by carrier
to any part of the city, West
Brownsville, Texas, or Matamoro9,
Mexico, one year $6.00; six months
$3.00; one month 50 cents.
Entered at the Postofllce at Browns
ville Texas, as Second Class Mail
Matter.
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 23. 1912
IMPORTANT CONVENTION AT
BROWNSVILLE WEDNESDAY.
On Wednesday, the 25th instant,
Brownsville will have as its guests
the members of the Lower Rio
Grande Commercial Secretaries' As
sociation. This will be a meeting of
more than ordinary significance. It
is a called meeting to he held for the
purpose of setting on foot a move to
interest th~ entire Valley in an ef
# fort to oi lain the enactment by the
next legislature of laws affecting ir
rigation and drainage which shall
be not onlr adequate to the needs of
these rapidly growing interests of
the state, but also framed so as to
stand constitutional test?. The idea
of the secretaries is merely to take
the initiative in this matter at pres
ent, and, at this meeting to arrange
for a mass meeting of all people in
the Valley who are interested in ir
—'v rigation and drainage, in order to
\Jake definite steps towards the pro
pped end, to be held at Brownsville
during the Midwinter Fair next
January.
\
The fact that there is now no law
regulating either irrigation or drain
age which is considered entirely
satisfactory \or adequate is sufficient
to cause a very general interest
throughout theVyalley in the effort
of the secretaries^long this line.
The local ChambV(; of Commerce
doubtless will see to f\, on the oc
casion of the visit of aiNjthe Valley
commercial secretaries fibre, that
they are properly entertained and
shown every courtesy. These men
represent every place of importance
in this section. In thorn, we shall
welcome officially the thriving towns
which go to make up the commercial
life of the Lower Rio Grande Val
ley. Let us give them the most
cordial greeting.
A good way to fight the boll
weevil is to plant forage and rai;e
hogs.
It would be well to put on the soff.
soft pedal when talking of your
neighbor's shortcomings.
Old Sol always kicks up a little
disturbance on cros-ing the line go
ing south.
The inventor of red lemonade Is
dead, but his fame should live as
long as the small boy and the circus
continue to be American institu
tions.
The savings bank? offer the best
provision for the rainy day. If
patronized sufficiently, they will pre
vent the, depositor from every join
ing the army of aged paupers, which
is already 1,125,000 strong in this
land. i
One of the political surprises of
the day is the fact that Vice Presi-1
dent Sherman has been ordered by a
physician to rest. Was there ever an-j
other vice president accused of over
working himself? i
’ There will be one woman in Con
necticut who will wear low white j
shoes and white hose, rain or cold,
all winter—if she sticks to her word.
That is the girl who has agreed on
a wager, to do this thing in the
event that Roosevelt is defeated.
The death of H. J. D. Astley, one i
of England’s most intrepid aviators,
bo fell with his aeroplane to in-1
“■“**§■ death Saturday at Belfast, j
adds another to the fas' j
t. of airship victims. Truly
^fTort >o realize man’s
* is to costly one.
JM * *
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SAN BENITO AND THE FAIR. 1
San Benito, having determin
ed to cooperate with the author
ities of the Midwinter Fair
which will be held, as usual,
in Brownsville this winter,
should leave nothing undone to
accord this city creditable rep
resentation at the Valley expo
sition. Anything worth doing
at all is worth doing well, so
San Benito should send a cred
itable exhibit to the Midwin er
Fair, or should send none at all.
A “San Benito Day” should
be a feature of the Midwinter
Fair, and there seems to us no
reason why such a day could
not be satisfactorily arranged.
If San Benito's cooperation is
properly welcomed by the fair
management the latter will be
glad to assist in promoting a j
“San Benito Day.”—San Benito
Light.
There is no doubt that the fair j
management would gladly welcome t
such a suggestion. A series of,
special days for the various towns of
the Valley w'ould be a fine idea. If
the other towns would enter into i
the arrangement, it very probably |
will be done . It is the earnest de- j
sire of the fair management to make l
the Midwinter Fair the Lower Rio j
Grande Valley’s Fair, and the cord-j
ial cooperation of all Valley towns)
is necessary to accomplish this end.)
The fair will afford a splendid op
portunity to advertise the resources
J of the entire Valley, and everyone
I who is interested in this wonderland
of agriculture should encourage the
idea of making it a great Valley ex
position.
« _
These are the days of specialists.
The boll weevil pest requires treat
ment by a specialist. The Frisco
people recognize this fact, and so
they have sent a specialist to tell the
farmers of the Lower Rio Grande
Valley how fight the pest.
In California, Johnson’s home,
state, the betting odds are 3 to 1
against Roosevelt and Johnson. In
New York, Vice President Sherman’s
I
(state, the odds are 4 to 1 against
| the Taft and Sherman ticket. Thus
: the bull moose and the g. o p. have
no laugh on each other on the bet
(ting score.
.. ■- - — ...
The United States may have given
its moral support to Madero in his
fight against Diaz, as some have
(charged. Still, 'he average Ameri
can today does not care who is at
the head of our si-ter republic, if
peace and order are preserved and
American interests in the republic
protected.
He who does not possess educa
tion may decry the value of educa
tion, hut ho that possesses an educa- ;
tion would not part with- it for all
that it cosv. to obtain it. The time
spent in obtaining this equipment
for life is counttd by some an time
lost, but that is because ihey do not
realize what it actually means to
have that equipment.
Grover Cleveland was one presi
dent who not only preached civil
service reform, but al-'o practiced it. j
Because he did not regard public pat- !
ronage as a perquisite of the presi- j
dential office, to be used to reward j
his supporters, or, by withdrawing i
it, to punish his enemies, he made a j
host of enemies within his own par- |
ty. But, although willing to sacri-1
flee himself upon the altar of what
he believed to be right, he made few
converts to his belief, and probably
the average American today still !
subscribes to the doctrine “to the
victor belongs the spoils.’’
Hr * * * * Hr rH Ht H: Hr Hr Hr Hr Hr v
THE NATIONAL BALL GAMES
Hr * * Hr H- Hr H- H- * * * Hr *
As played throughout the country
by the various leagues.
Associated Press.
American League. <
Boston at De'.roit, rain.
Washington 6-4, Chicago 2-1.
New York at Cleveland, rain.
Philadelphia 4-S, St. Louis 2-1. <
._ i
American Association.
aKnsas City 7-5, St. Paul 4-6.
Indianapolis 1-2, Louisville il-O.
Milwaukee 5-4, Minneapolis 0-2.
olumbus at Toledo, rain.
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As a general thing the man who
borrows the most trouble is 'the fel
low who has ler.t a lot of money.
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J A. Ottmann «
CONTRACTOR
Concrete Walks and All Kinds of ,
Cement and Brick Work
BROWNSVILLE, . • TEXAS. I
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[EACHERS MY WEAR |.
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( Continued From Page one )
nation, to government control, and <
to include in the transfer, all the i
eachers who had been engaged in 1
this work in the sectarian schools ,
ind to incorporate them as a whole
ind as individuals in the classified
civil service of the government.
It appears that out of 2,000
teachers in the Indian schools there
are 51 who wear a religious garb
and who are regularly classified
members of the government civil
service. To direct them to give up
their religious garb would necessar
ily cause their leaving the service
because of the vows under which
they have assumed that garb.
Religious Freedom Not Violated.
The secretary of the interior holds,
as a matter of congressional policy,
that all orders herafter made should
bo directed toward securing the sec
ular and nonsectarian character of
teaching; that this is the evident
purpose of congress from its legisla
tion. He holds, further, that the
wearing of a distinctive religious
garb is not, as claimed by some be
fore him, a violation of any con-ti
tutional limitation in respect to re
ligion. He therefore finds that to
allow the present members of the
civil service to wear a distinctive
garb to remain in the service until
such time as their service may end,
either by resignation, separation for
eau;e, disability, or by death, is not
forbidden by existing law or statute,
and that while the method of trans
fers was a mistaken one, the circum
stances surrounding them constitute
an equity in favor of those who ar'
now in the service wearing the garb
Will Forbid Garb Hereafter.
On the other hand, he finds that
a regulation forbidding the wearing
of such a garb by teachers to be here
after appointed would be equitable,
reasonable and within the authority
of the secretary of the inferior to
prescribe. In the exercise of his
lawful discretion as secretary of the
interior, therefore, he believes it
wiser that hereafter no such trans
fers in solido of school plant and
teachers or any denomination to he
government school should be made,
and that no set of teachers wearing
distinctive rePgious garb should be
by order in the future incorporated
into the government civil service of
'teachers. His opinion is that, while
it is neither unlawful or impossible
for teachers in a distinctly religious
garb to do nonsectarian teaching, it
makes as between denominations in
terested that only secular teach intr
be given, for more apparent equality
of treatment not to increase or to
add to those now in the service who
wear a religious or denominational
garb. No order or rule, therefore,
seems necessary to carry this pur
pose of the secretary into effect
Not to Revive Revoked Order.
The action of the secretary of the
interior is to maintain the status
quo by refusing to revive she order
which was revoked, and by retain inr
in the service those now engaged in
teaching, althoug wearing a dis
tinctive religious garb, but to de
clare his intention strictly to pursue
the policy hereafter of maintaining
only nonsectarian teaching by gov
ernment teachers in government
schools, and on the other hand, to
leave to the varous denominations
interested, full opportunity, out of
regular school hours in the rooms of
such government schools, to conduct
religious education according to the
customs and the tenets of each de
nomination for ‘the children, who
themselves or through their parents
have elected to become members of
such denominations.
The action of the secretary of the
interior is, therefore, approved.
VVM. H. TAFT.
September 22, 1912.
--g
NEW BASE STEALING
RECORD ESTABLISHED
\ssociated Press.
Spokane, Wash., Sept. 22.—First
Baseman Mclves of the Spokane team
>f the Northwestern League, estab
ished a new base stealing record
rere today bv stealing the 108th
sase of the season. The former re
cord is 10.‘» bases, held by Zimmer
nan of the Chicago National team.
EARNING OF STORM
ON GULF COAST
Vssooiated Press.
New Orleans. La., Sept. 22.—Ad
riEory storm warning is-ued by the
leather bureau order s'orm signals
lisplayed on the gulf coast from
3ensacola to New Orleans. The dl->
urbance is reported to be central
>ver Ixmisiana moving northeasterly.
The recent striking of an Italian
irmy baloon by lightning was the
irst happening of the kind known
o V Ntltta.
P^^BB
If the statistics were available No wonder Eve was restless in
irobably it would be found that! on Eden. There wasn t a thing for her
he average it takes about three to gossip about except snake tracks
nonths after a girl declines to marry under the apple tree.
l man for him to get glad of it. -lr.
--r.- Just about the time a man is old
There are some women who don’t enough to realize the importance of
>ven say “Get thee behind me, making hay while the sun shines it
la'tan,’’ until they have looked at
heir back in the mirror. begins to rain.
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Are Your 1912 Plans I
“Making Good, ’ ’Mr. Merchant?
Does your showing to date promise bigger sales,
decreased expenses and greater profits for the rest of /
the year? 'l
Are you equipped for the best and biggest fight in ll
your business career, for results, result s—RE- '
SULTS?
Do you appreciate the telephone which stands so
modestly at your elbow, yet is so powerful in busi
ness-building and profit-making?
Are you fully and adequately equipped, telephon- |
ically? Call the Business Office and we’ll help you j
The Southwestern Telegraph & I
_.irwii )mwimiiiphihiii mini ilT
TV!>rmgto«i fiilt
pMmr«Mr«ar
m&Mlm
For singles—tTap or field—just K
toss in a shell, press the button and—“PULL.” The side bolt B
I makes it easy. You don’t have to tug at the barrel or watch an |
on-and-off device. The action stays open after each single shot Hf
is fired.—It always stays open when the magazine is empty. B
Five shots—three to get the cripples—each under absolute con- M
trol of the trigger finger. The recoil reloads for you—kicks
another shell in; takes the strain off the gun—the discomfort out ||
of the kick—all without diminishing the drive behind the shot, pi
Simple take-down—a few turns of the readily handled p
magazine screw-cap makes cleaning, carrying and inter- j|
change of barrels quick and easy. ig
Send for a motion picture booklet telling how the p
kick is used—how a friction device found only on g
the Remington- UMC Autoloading Shotgun takes §■•
the punishment out of heavy loads. g?
Write to-day. |
REMINGTON ARMS-UNION I
METALLIC CARTRIDGE CO. 1
299 Broadway 7 New York City i
i & ^ ''a
I demit*
I BRINGS HAPPINESS I
I <0 fa ENTIRE FAMILY^ g
I SANANTOMO BREWING ASSN. SftN ANTONIO TEXAS |
T. Crixell, Sole Dealer, Brownsville
MOLES MID WARTS
Removed with MOLESOFF. without pain or danger, no matter how
large or how far raised above the surface of the skin. And they will
never return and no trace or scar will be left. MOLESOFF is ap
plied directly to the MOLE or WART, wihch entirely disappears in
about six days, killing the germ and leaving the skin smooth and
natural.
MOLESOFF IS PUT UP ONLY IN ONE DOLLAK BOTTLES.
Each bottle is forwarded postpaid on receipt of price, is neatly
packed in a plain case, accompanied by full directions, and con
tainsenough remedy to remove eight to ten ordinary MOLES OR
WARTS. We sell MOLESOFF under a positive GUARANTEE if it
fails to remove your MOLE or WART, we will promptly refund the
dollar. letters from personages we all know, together with much
valuable information, will be mailed free upon request.
Guaranteed by the Florida Distributing Co. under, the Food and
Drug Act, June ”0, 1906. Serial No. 43633. j
Please mention this paper w’hen answering.
Florida Distributing Company Pens^la, Florida.
PLATE GLASS
FRONTIER LUMBER CO.
THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK f
< >
of Brownsville, Texas
< i
United States Depository
Capital $100,000.00
SURPLUS AND UNDIVIDED PROFITS $125,000.00 J i
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_____ ___ < *
^HE MODEL LAUNDBY.
We have recently Installed in our Cleaning and Pressing department a
“Hoffman Steam Pressing Machine.”
In pressing cloths with this machine, live dry steam is brought, in di
rect contact with the mi terial, the garment is pressed uniformly, aet
and sterilized at one operation. Scorching is utterly impossible.
This process is more sanitary than the old method and the work is bet
ter. Our operators are skillful and our prices are slightlr low#- t.ha*’ re
medy.
Coat and pants, steamed and pressed $.50.
Coat and pants, cleaned and pressed $1.00
Skirts, steamed and pressed $.50. up.
Other garments in proportion
TRY US Bo. ]
See
West
B r ownsville
YOU’LL LIKE IT
Street car line under construction to Country Club.
INVESTIGATE.
. * .. 4k r
J. B. Scott, Gen. Mgr.
Brownsville, Texas
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BRICK-BRICK
When contemplating to bulM ytur Residence, Bntlnees or Bane
Building, specify our brick.
Our plant is up to date. Dally capacity twenty thousand, located
three miles north of Brownsville on the main line of the Siint I,onlt.
Brownsville & Mexico vailroad. Our facilities for loading from our
private spurs insures prompt shipments.
Sample# of brick will be sent prepaid upon request.
Telephone 100, Brownsville, Texas
OFFICE, ALAMO LUMBER CO.
Gulf Coast Brick and Tile Compan
MANUFACTURERS OF BRICK
I- F JOHNION. Manager
.•K*********rk***-H- ***************
i The Miller Hotel *
* *
* The Largest and Most Modern Hotel *
* in South-West Texas *
* - *
* The Most Southerly Hotel in U. S, *
* _ . *
;; ON TO THE GULF *
^ s
Hear What the Wild Waves are Saying.
* *
* Brownsville, Texas.
* *
******************************
amfm
fresh Bermuda Onion Seed
the following prices:
- $12.00 per pound,
ish variety) $7.00 per pound.
so order at once. a
PHILLIPS, I
:: :: TEXAS.
TRY 1 .W AD IN THE ONLY HERALD
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