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Brownsville herald. [volume] (Brownsville, Tex.) 1910-current, September 24, 1912, Image 1

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CALORIC FIRELESS COOKERS „ - gLflMXO -
Mo*t Sanitary and Convenient Boils’ SHOWYOU
BROWNSVILLE HARDWARE CO V - BROW^Se ^DWARE CO
VOL. XX. NO. 69. BROWNSVILLE, TEXAS TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 1912. _PMCE C£irT8,
GREATEST COTTON
COUNTRY OF ALL
Hardy Dial Says of Lower Rio Grande
Valley—Detailed Report on Boll
Weevil Pest Promised.
That the Ix>wer Rio Grande Val
ley may be made the greatest cotton
producing region of the entire coun
try, is the opinion of Hardy Dial,
cotton expert, who is visiting the
Valley on behalf of the Frisco rail
road. Indeed, if Mr. Dial were a
real estate agent, people no doubt
would of accuse him of exaggeration,
but as he is a cotton expert, and
one who has based a thorough scien
tific knowledge of the subject upon
a foundation of many years of actual
experience in cotton growing, and we
must accept his words on the sub
ject at their face value.
He says unhesitatingly that he
never saw finer soil or a more favor
able climate for cotton.
“I never saw such soil anywhere,"
he declare^ to a Herald representa
tive. “I am sure that by the selec
tion of proper seed and with proper
cultivation, your farmers could
make from two to four bales to 'the
acre You may be surprised at that,
but I have known many instances
where as much as that has been har
vested per acre. You have at least
twro months longer here in which
to make cotton than any other sec
tion.”
Mr. Dial has the honor to be em
ployed as cotton expert on the state
board of agriculture of Oklahoma,
and has the distinction of having
actually rid that state of the boll
weevil within the past two years. He
came to the Lower Rio Grande Val
ley at the request of the Frisco peo
ple and will devote several weeks to
a study of the boll weevil situation
here, at the same time visiting all
of the leading towns and lecturing
the farmers on the way to get rid of
the destrictuve pest. , The Frisco
people were anxious to secure his
services for a longer period, but Ok
lahoma wras loath to part with him,
and so, for the present, he is only
j>n a -Heave of several months. He
may, however, in the event that the.
Valley farmers show sufficient in-1
terest in the matter, arrange to con
duct a regular campaign against the
boll weevil, which would occupy
him for perhaps a year.
To return to Mr. Dial's opinion of
the Brownsville Country—he says
unhesitatingly that he never saw
finer soil or a more favorable climate
for cotton.
Mr. Dial will speak in all the
towns of the Valley before returning
to Kingsville. He has undertaken
this work under the direction of
iWm. Doherty, assistant general man
ager of the Gulf Coast Line.
ERRORS IN BONDS
WEREJORRECTED
Special Session ol County Commis
sioners Makes Minor Changes in
Drainage Bonds.
Two errors in the bonds voted by
the San Benito drainage district
were mainly the cause of a special
session of the board of county com
missioners, which began yesterday.
The bonds, which have been ap
proved and registered, were made
payable at the “Mechanics1 & Metals
Bank” at New York City, when the
name should have read “Mechanics'
& Metals National bank.” By an
order of the court the mistake was
rectified.
Another formal error was correct
ed when an order wa,« made that the
bonds be made payable in United
States gold coin, this formality hav- I
ing been omitted in the original
order.
The court accepted the resignation
of I. B. McFarland, commissioner
from precinct No. 3, and appointed
J. Stanley Ford, also of Harlingen. !
to the commissionership. Mr. Ford |
fi’ed his bond of $3000.
|
The court will resume the ses5ion !
this morning at 10 o'clock. The
special term will probably not last
more than two or three days.
—-o
Fdod and dishes may be warmed
upon a steam radiator by using a
rack for the purpose patented by a
Massachusetts man.
ONE PLATE AND TWO SPOONS
Is certainly speaking well of our ice
cream. We not only give you qual
ity but also a generous quantity.
Our ice cream is pure and well
flavored and only fhe best and most
wholesome ingredients are used.
Order some now delivered packed in
ice at the following prices:
ONE-HALF GALLON . $ .75
ONE GALLON . 1.25
In brick (plain or fancy) 50c each.
ELITE CONFECTIONERY
PHONE 188.
*******************************
» While In the Valley j
* DON’T FAIL TO VISIT *
Emission.!
*
* - *
* Elevation, 14o feet. *
4- ^
* Irrigation, unexcelled. *
* *
* Drainage, natural. *
I WE PROVE IT j
*
*
* To be the most progressive, high*
* *
ly develooed, prosperous, thriv* *
*
ing proposition in the Lower Rio
* Grande Valley. / *
* A oersoaal investigation will con- *
m vince you of the greater advan- H
tages and opportunities offered. *
j MISSION LAND IMPROVEMENT COMPANY •
* MISSION. TEXAS *
*
* JOHN J. CONWAY J
a: H
President V Sole Owner ^
* a
********************************
DOT ENOUGH VOTES
TO PASS BUDGET
I
_
ONLY FOUR ALDERMAN ATTEND
ED CITY COUNCIL
Tax Rate for Present Year Will be
$1.22 1-2- Same as Last Year.
Various Important Mat*ers Con
sidered at Yesterday’s Session.
A two-thirds favorable vo'e of the
entire city council being necessary,
the city fathers did not pass the I
budget for the current year at yes
terday’s regular session of the city
council as was intended. Present
were Mayor Cole, and Aldermen
Cain, Benavides, Blackshear and
Crixell; absent, Aldermen Cobolini,
Browne, Thorn and Kirk. Alder
menThorn and Kirk were absent on
account of illness and Mr. Browne
is away on leave. Alderman Cobo-1
lini has just returned from an ab
sence of two months, but did not at
tend the meeting.
The ma'tter will be disposed of at
the Meeting next Monday.
The tax rate for the present year j
will be the same as that of last year
—$1.22 1-2. Though the city is in,
debt, the committee did not think it
advisable to increase the tax rate,
and the budgets that have been pre
pared are also similar to those of
last year.
The ordinance covering the ;
budget for the current year, and j
which the mayor read before the
council yesterday, apportions the
taxes as follows:
For general maintenance, 62.3.
For strets, briges, etc., 13.
For building*, improvements, etc.,
23.
To state school fund, 20.
Poll tax $1.
It was explained that when the
last budget was made the council
took up about $3000 in old debts, i
and the running expenses of the city
have increased about $2000 during 1
the present year. This has been
cau*ed by street improvements and ;
o|ther additions. However, it is be
lieved that, the increased valuations
will enable the city council to elimi
nate all old debts within the next
two or three years.
Each member of the council who
has not been given leave of absence
i will be notified by letter bv the city
secretary to be present at the next
meeting. Any councilman absent
ing himself from a meeting without
reasonable excuse is subject to a
fine of $2. However, it is not an
ticipated that there will be any
trouble in getting the necessary
number to attend the next meeting.
It was shown that the city now
has about $4,300 cash on hand, col
lected from the delinquent tax list
A resolution was adopted by the
council to pay out of this amount
about $2,800, which will include
about $1,130 for the purchase or
pipe and construction of the emer
gency pipe line at the water plant
the payment of an account due N
E. Rendall, amounting to $241, and
the balance owing C.eo. Hamlinek on
the construction of the storm sewer
system, amounting to about $1,400.
A monthly report from E. A
Stobart, covering the water and
light department, was read. It
showed the receipts from the water
works system to be abtut $900. In
this connection, Alderman Black
shear stated that the records show
that the plant is pumping 400,000
gallons daily. On this basis, he
figures that the city is receiving
about eight cents a thousand gal
lons for water, thus losing money,
whereas, if the city were getting 13
cents, the plant would make money
He staged that there is a great
waste of water, mentioning some
suburbanites who even go so far as
to irrigate sugar cane with the city
water. He said that water is being
pumped at a loss, and believes th«
ciu.’ should get 200 additional wa
ter meters. Mr. Stobart is already
in correspondence with the water
meter people to see what arrange
ments can be made for securing the
meters.
In the matter wherein the Browns
ville Sewer company asks that the
■ council remit its taxes for 1910, the
council decided that it could not be
• done. The city attorney was in
■ s’rueted to proceed to collect the
‘ *
: taxes.
Referring to the failure of people
- against whom complaints had been
i'made for failure to connect with the
t t
: sewrerage system. City Attorney
. Kinder stated to the council that
- several men who had promised the
corporation judge to make the con
HOW TO PHOLOHG
THE HUMAN LIFE
I
INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS ON
HYGIENE AND DEMOGRAPHY

Great International Congress Now
in Session to Devise Means of Im
proving Human Welfare, and to
Prolong the Lives of Men.
Washington, D. C., Sept. 23.— !
With thirty-two leading govern- i
ments and forty-eight states pour
ing their wealth of knowledge to
improve public welfare and to pro- i
long human life into one common
fund for the world s use, the Fif
teenth International Congress on
Hygiene and Demography opened
its week’s session here this morning, j
Four hundred and fifty of the fore
most sani'tarv authorities in the j
world in formal addresses will con- ,
tribute the latest discoveries and j
methods in their respective coun- j
tries in the realm of adding comfort !
and years to human life. It is ex
pected that the attendance at th*
nine sections into which the congres*
is divided will number five thousand
including many of the national
state and city health officials of this
country.
While the object of the congres
is to extend the knowledge and im
prove the practice of hygiene and
public health in all the countries
which participate, it is believed
these benefits will accrue in largest
measure to the country which is foi
the time being the host of the con
gress. That the state and municipal
public health officials of this coun
try attending the congress will have
support outside of immediate sani
tary circles in seeking to put intc
effect various health reforms tha'
will be suggested by the congress i
indicated by the action of large
business enterprise in being repre
sented at the proceedings. Amonr
these is the Association of Life In
surance Presidents, which is repre
sented by its general counsel, R. L
Cox of New York and by its healtl
committee as follows: F. W. .Ten
kins, chairman, Binghampton, N. Y.
I. R. Clark, Cincinnati, O.; W. F
Dix, New York; J. L. English. Hart
ford. Conn.; J. K. Gore, Newark, N
J. ; Dr. A. S. Knight. New York, and
E. S. Scott, Springfield, 111.
The committee has systematical!:
subdivided the program of the con
gress so that at least one membet
will be present at each address o'
interest to it. In particular th
committee is following that part o
the work of congress dealing witl
the control of contagious disease, in
eluding typhoid fever, diptheria
cerebrospinal meningitis, tubercu
losis, etc.; with the sanitary aspect
of public water supplies, including
the sanitary control of water sheds
the purification of water by storage
water purification in Europp by bio
logical methods: water sterilization
by chemical methods and with th*
disposal of sewage ard wastes by th<
various processes now carried on ir
the European countries. Wherever
knowledge as to improved’ method
is obtained it is the intention of th*
; life insurance interests to svstemat
ically aid constituted authorities ir
I applying those methods to condition
in this country. In this way it i*
hoped to improve the mortality ex
'perience among life insurance policj
j holders.
It has been contended for som*
time by Prof. Irving Fisher of Yah
University ‘that the practical appli
cation of all the reforms now knowr
| to modern hygiene, would add fifteer
years to the span of life in th<
United States.
*
nections had not yet done so. H<
was instructed to have policemer
: summon before Corporation Judg*
iCelaya those who have failed t^
‘make good “heir promises. If th*
work has been done they will be dis
mi*sed, but if not they probably wil1
be fined.
The St. Louis, Brownsville ant
Mexico railroad submitted the forir
of franchise it desires for the indus
trial track it has constructed or
Fronton sr.reet. The proposed fran
chise was turned over to the street
[and brige committee and the city
attorney for attention.
The claim of Sheriff C. T. Ryan
of Cameron county for caring for
Jetty prisoners from May 20, 1912
to September 15, 1912, amounting
to $55.50, was referred to the city
marshal for approval.
A few small bills, properly ap
proved by the heads of the various'
committees, were ordered paid.
Al BOYCE PLEAD
FOB HIS LIFE
EFFORTS TO HAVE SNEED AD
MITTED TO BAIL
Witness Testified that Boyce Begged
for Life After He Was Shot First
| Time—Sixty Witnesses Summoned
by Both Sides.
i
Associated Prev.
Amarillo, Tex., Sept. 23.—That
Al G. Boyce, for whose killing John
Beal Sneed is held on a charge of
murder, pleaded with is slayer not
to shoot again after the first 'hot
was fired, and that Sneed deplied,
“guess you are dead,” using an
epithet, was testified to this after
noon by Earl Jackson, a youth, in
the habeas corpus proceeding' seek
ing to release Sneed under bond.
Another witness of the actual
killing, the Rev. Earnest Robinson,
however, testified differently than
Jackson as to the details of the
shooting.
Other witne'ses today told of the
occupancy of the house in Amarillo
by Sneed, and much evidence was
introduced to show that Sneed was
not recognized by his acquaintances
in the garb he wore on the day of
the killing, with a beard.
An effort to introduce the elope
ment of Boyce and the wife of Sneed,
was taken to indicate an “unwritten
law” basis defense was prevented
this afternoon by the objection of
the prevention counsel who held
that no precedent had been laid. The
witness under examination at the
time said he knew nothing of the
elopement and Attorney Wiliam Mac
Lain of the defense counsel, said he
would waive the question tem
porarily.
Twelve witnesses were heard to
day. The state will probably con
clude tomorrow. The defense is not
expected to consume more than a
half a day. Sixtyvne witnesses have
been summoned in all.
Robert Epting, the alleged accom
oliee of Sneed was before the grand j
jury this morning.
-o
CAMPA SURRENDERS
10JMERICA1S
REBEL GENERAL CROSSES INTO
UNITED STATES
After Defeat in Seven Hour*’ Battle
at Altar, Being Out of Ammuni
tion* Rebel Leader Seeks Safety on
American Soil.
I
Associated Pre°s.
Tucson, Ariz., Sept. 23.—After a
chase through northern Sonora by
Mexican federals after his raid on
the mining camps and lines of the
Southern Pacific railroad, General
Emilio P. Campa, rebel leader and
his staff crossed the American line |
and are now prisoners of the United
States.
Campa today admitted his iden
tity and said he was tired of fighting. }
He was captured by United State* ;
Marshal Overlook, Sheriff Nelson
and a deputy without resistance. He
had sent two men into Tucson Satur
day for automobiles and they were
arrested. After questioning they
told of the location of the remaind
er of the party.
Campa said he was surprised at
the opposition he met at the hands
of the federals. He was hard
I pushed by pursuing federals after a
seven hours’ battle at Altar, and be
ing practically without ammunition
he decided to seek safety in the
United States with a faint hope that
he could get ammunition.
He had only four hundred dollars
when arrested and his companions
; about two hundred each. This is
taken as a denial of the story that
he had secured three hundred thou
sand dollar* as a result of the cam
paign.
Mexican Consul Anaya has com
municated with his government with
a view to having Campa extradited
on a charge of murder.
PENNANT WON
BY MINNEAPOLIS
Associated Pre*»s.
Chicago. 111., Sept. 23.—The
American Assocation closed its reg
ular sea*on today, with Minneapolis,
* the champoins of the last two sea
sons, pennant winners.
NICHOLS RELEASED
FROM PRISON
KEPT UNDER GUARD IN A CITY
HOSPITAL
American Fruit Grower, Imprisoned
on Charge of Killing Mexican
Bandit’ Taken Ou* of Prison on
Demand of merican Authorities.
\ssociated Press.
Mexico City, Mex., Sept. 23.—,W.
2. Nichols, the American fruit grow
er, for whose release the American
imbassador made a preemptory de
mand of the governor of the state of
ramaulipas, has been removed from
:he Tampico jail and placed in a
lospital under guard.
Nichols is critically ill because of
lis confinement. He was sentenced
o eight year imprisonment for Idli
ng a Mexican bandit, and the court
n reconsidering his case disregarded
he confession of a Mexican who ad
mitted he was the slayer.
Today's action has relieved the
ntuation which was fast becoming
icute. Ambassador Wilson express
ed himself as being satisfied with
present arrangements, but will per
mit no delay in further proceedings.
He is confident Nichols will be freed.
■ _sg_
Tile sewers have a carrying ca
pacity just about twice that of brick
ones of the same size.
TO EMPLOY MAH
FOR MID-WINTER FAIR
Committee Appointed to Secure Ser
vices of Experienced Man—Other
Plans No* Fully Decided.
A regular meeting of the directors
of the Midwinter Fair Association
was held at the Chamber of Com
merce yesterday afternoon. Besides
the regular business transacted, a
committee comprised of J. B. Scott
and W. E. McDavitt was appointed
to employ a man to take charge of
the fair. A man experienced in
handling fairs will be secured, and
an effort will be made to get one
here as soon as possible.
Nothing definite has as yet been
decided, it being seemingly a diftfraJU
matter to arrange the details of the
proposed entertainment. Many
ideas have to be considered from
every standpoint, and they can not
be adopted until it is certain they
will prove valuable.
The directors artending yesterday
were W. E. McDavitt, B. (». Stegman,
J. B. Scott, E. A. McGary and W. H.
Mason, jr.
Thirteen women and one man who
had lived more than 100 years died
in Buenos Ayres last year.
-o
A scholarship in the chemistry of
baking has been established Ip the
UniversUy of Pittsburg.
SAN BENITO
THE
BIG CANAL TOWN
The livest and largest new town in Texas in the
LOWER RIO GRANDE VALLEY
San Benito has grown from nothing to over four thousand population In
four years and today offers best location for commercial and in
dustrial nterprises in Southwest Texas. Natural advantages
and improvements already ma de insure city cf importance.
The growth and development have only started.
NEARLY HALF A MILLION
Dollars railrc d business on St. Louis, Brownsviilo and Mexico Railway
at San Benito, in one year. Sixty-seven per cent increase over business
of previous year.
Vear ending April 30th 1911 1912
Freight received 142,819.44 235,880.20
Freight forwarded 42,839.33 96,100.31
Express received 12,539.64 16,426.23
Express forwarded 18,098.34 19,025.4 4
Ticket sales 31,460.95 43,960.66
Excess Baggage 292.25 47S.70
Switching, storage, and
demurrage No record 3,204.11
Total Value of Business 248,050.95 414,076.65
Above represents only the amount paid to the St. L. B. ft M. for hand
ling business shown and NOT THE VALUE OF PRODUCTS HANDLED.
EIGHTY THOUSAND ACRES OF RICH DELTA SOIL
irrigated from the big San Benito Canal surround the town of Ban Be
nito. Twenty-five thousand acres al ready in cultivation.
INTERURBAN RAILROAD NOW IN OPERATION
over 40,000 acres of this tract serving every farm with convenient
freight and express service. Extension being made on the balance of
the tract. Rio Hondo, Santa Maria, Carricitos, Los Indies and La Paloma ,
on interurban road out of San Benito. Convenient achedule.
IT WILL PAY YOU TO INVESTIGATE SAN BENITO
before engaging in farming, commercial or industrial enterprises else
where in Texas.
SAN BENITO UNO IT WATER COMPANY.
SIN BENITO. TEXIS.
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