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Brownsville herald. [volume] (Brownsville, Tex.) 1910-current, October 24, 1912, Image 1

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-~ss„. BROWNSVILLE HERALD.
otVtnflL InUUoANO
Bv Senator Beveridee Aft<T Elect'on
of 1904—Perkin* «nd McLean
Received $55-000.
By Associated Press.
Washington. I). C.( Oct. 23._Wit
nesses testifying today before the
senate committee investigating cam
paign contributions, told of the re
turn, after the election of 1P04, of
fifty-seven thousand dollars. Thirty
thousand of this amount was re
turned to George W. Perkins, twen
ty-five thousand to Edward R. Mc
Lean, a cousin of Beveridge, and
either two or three thousand dollars
to Gifford Pinchot, according to the
witnesses.
Perkins, testifying yesterday, only
reealedl contributing ten thousand
dollars to the Beveridge fund, which
was returned.
The committee will be in session
again tomorrow. Senator Pomerene
announced his desire to pursue the
Beveridge matter further.
■-o
GOVERNOR JOHNSON’S
FAMILY FOR WILSON
New York. Oct. 23.—According
to a telegram received by Rudolph j
Spreckles, president of the Progres
sive Republican League, today, the
Johnson family in California is bad
ly divided. A
“Grove L. Johnson, the father of
Governor Johnson, who is Roose
velt’s running mate” said Mr.
Spreckles, “has said that he he
would be willing to walk from San
Francisco to New York in his bare :
feet if Roosevelt is defeated.
“A. L. Johnson, a nephew of Gov
ernor Johnson, and one of our prom- -
nent attorneys of San Francisco, Is
not alone going to vote against
Roosevelt and Johnson, lui't he is
making speeches in behalf of Gov- •
ernor Wilson.”
-o
Weather For<‘ca*t.
By Associated Press. t
Washington, 1). f\. Oct. 23. - West, ,
Texas—Generally fair Thursday and
Friday. East Texav -Cloudy Tliurs- y
day; fair with rising temperature;
Friday. I
--*- I
According to Dr. Wiley’s story, if
the drug saccharin is good for the t
chief bull moose as a sick medicine, 6
It must be good for others as a food. c
New York World. Ig
FAIR STICKERS ARE
ROW READY FOR US
D°s'?n Same as La*t Year—Valle
Mrrchants Engage Space *n Faj
News.
Flaming red stickers advertisin
; Brownsville's sixtli annuai Midwir
ter Fair to be held in January hav
been received by the fair assoeij
tion for distribution to any wh
wish to use them on mail matter t
help along 'the good work f publicity
The design used this year in th
stickers is the same as that used fo
the last fair, showing the outline c
the state of Texas in red with th
words “Brownsville Midwinter Fail
Januery 6 to 15,” lettered in whit*
The sticker is unique in design am
never fails to attract attention how
ever used.
Secretary Whitney of the Chambe
of Commerce who has accompaniei
Manager F. H. Williams of the Fail
association on several of his trip
lo Valley towns, reports that Mr
Williams is meeting with splendit
success in his efforts in behalf of thi
coming fair. A large number of ad
‘for publication in the Fair New:
have been secured from individua
firms and large corporations all over
the Valley. In fact, so many hav<
arranged for space thus far, as tc
lead the promoters to believe thai
an edition containing twenty or pos
sibly thirty pages will have to bt
printed to accommodate all desiring
space.
Those having the matter or publi
cation in charge are urgent in their
request that all advertisers who in
:end to advertice shall send in the
-°Py to be used at the earliest pos
sible moment.
** * *****&******«
K *
MARKET REPORTS.
K *
K * * * V * * * r!“ * * * * * * *
Cotton.
3y Associated Press.
New Orleans, La., Oct. 23.—Cot
on futures closed steady with a net
iodine of 1 t.o 3 points. Spots were
teady and unchanged.
Cat*le.
ly Associated Press.
Kansas C’lty, Mo., Oct. 22.—Cat
le were steady and active; export
teers $8.50 to $10.75. Hogs 10
onts lower; heavies $8.35 to $8.50.
heep rultMl 15 to 25 cents lower.
ON A SWEET FOUNDATION
Is the friendship built with the
aid of our chocolates or other
candies. They make warm friends
wherever they go. Try a box and
taste its contents. If you are like
everybody else you will not be
satisfied with one taste. You'll
want another and another until
'the box is empty.
ELITE CONFECTIONERY
PHONE 188
; While In the Valley i
... $
DON’T FAIL TO VISIT *
MISSION.!
* *
-;. *
Elevation, 14o feet. *
l Irrigation, unexcelled. I
4. ft!
Drainage, natural. %
I WE PROVE IT I
*
*
* To be the most progressive, high*
•4 #
* ly developed, prosperous, thriv*
ing proposition in the Lower Rio *
J Grande Valley. *
A personal investigation will con- *
*
vince you of the greater advan* *
tages and opportunities offered. +
\ MISSION LAND IMPROVEMENT G0MPA1Y \
l ’ MISSION, TEXAS *
* *
* JOHN J. CONWAY ;
President V Sole Owner f
. *
» * * * * IK # * * # * * # # & ** * * * * * * * * * * * * * * ft
; * * v v * * * * * * * * -u * * ** *-r v;- * + * * * ** « * * * * *-:- * * * * *
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j | J^T'^sai [email protected]®«600aE08e,;
II ®SS«S '
nBSS^SlS?
• I 5?;p THE GREAT OWE
i * Mans. w» ^"““SSP^^sSkc
° * OEMOC^^^HA^CO^EE
' ;:‘ A uemkoheiv mawED KasoiwRECB^ Wig BE stiff TO
1 X _____ . ya-,/1k-^-A_
V' l n 1 ^ "I *
\*' •
w! JOIN THIS PROCESSION NOW.
ri- -:• •:• -:- -:-:;• & ?:• & $ * * & & * ?:• * * •• * •*» -
THE DIAZ MOVEMENT
DAS TAME ENDING
LITTLE RESISTANCE MADE AT
VERA CRUZ
Rebel Le«der >n Hands of Madero
Soldiers—Will Perhaps bl* Shot.
Le*s than Hundred Killed and
Wounded in Short
I
By Associated Press.
Vera Cruz, Mex., Oct. 23.—The
revolution of Felix Diaz collapsed
today when the federals under Gen
eral Joaquin Beltran and Colonel
Jimenez ('astro entered Vera Cruz,
arrested Diaz and his officers and
(took possession of the city with
j slight opposition.
The revolutionists at the bar
1 raks. however, refused to surrender
; and say they will resist until the
last man is killed.
Diaz and his officers, it is believed,
will be shot. The soldiers will not
be punished.
Instead of a great battle as ex
pected, there was but a slight re
sistance to the federal advance.
Felix Diaz was arrested at police
headquarters by Col. Castro and
fifty men, when his force of three
hundred men refused to fire on the
federals.
Everything was in a muddle when
the federals entered the city. Rebels
and federals encountered each other
on the street^ without knowing
which side the other was affiliated
with, as all the uniforms were alike.
Less than a hundred were killed
or wounded. Medical assistance for
the wounded was sent from "he Uni
ted States cruiser Des Moines.
Colonel Castro was wounded in
the leg.
Colonel Diaz Ordaza, of the twen
ty-first infantry, who was with 'he
regiment when it joined the revolu
tion, has disappeared.
%'o foreigners were hurt.
DIAZ MUST FACE
A COURT MARTIAL
Soldiers Who D^eHed Will be Deci
mated—Collapse of Diaz Move
ment Surprise Capital.
By Associated Press.
Mexico City, Mex., Oct. 23.—Gpo
Felix Diaz, Jo^e Diaz Ordaza and all
the officers of the rebellious troops
and marines will be hailed imuKd- i
iately before a court martial and
will doubtless suffer the death pen- j
alty. Orders have been issued con- ■
■vening the court. The soldiers of |
Vhc rebellious troops will be de' 1- j
mated, one in ten being shot, who'
Vill he chosen by lor to pay the pen-,
hlty for all.
This inormation is imparted of- \
ficially tonight. The collapse of
the Diaz movement with a minimum .
bf fighting was greeted with gr^at I
surprise here in administration cir
cles. The outcome is regarded as
*he highest nos-ibile vindication of!
the loyalty of the army.
The troops under General Blan
quet, who are enronte to Vera Cruz !
have been ordered to return to the j
north and resume the ampaign |
again.*: Pascual Orozco.
The Diaz rebellion, ending in a
fiasco slightly less pronounced than
that of General Reyes last December. ;
♦ . .
_• • ' * * •
* • * » »* *r *i* ’>* *»" ** *i* t*~ v v *»* *»'
1* &
Roos°v**lt Distinctly Better.
-r Oyster Bay, 0< t. 23.—Theo
(lore Roosevelt is distinctly be - v
v ter tonight, according to the %
I*!; official bulletin of the physi- -1
!- cian. The colonel spent the v
day quie'lv. Several visitors, v
Jv jjowever, were admitted, -I
!*!• among the number being Geo.
*!- W. Perkins.
-I- Roosevelt was permitted to -!•
-I- sit up a while today, but a v
!- close watch was kept to pre- -!
•!* vent him from over-exerting '-!■
himself. v
ORTON ENTERTAINED
IN MATAMOROS
Specialist in Plant Industrv Guest
of Honor at Dinner Yesterday.
Ple»*ed Wi»h Arraneremen<s Her*'.
W. A. Orton, of the bureau of
plant industry, department of agri
culture, Washington, I). C., who ar
rived in Brownsville Tuesday, spent
a busy day yesterday, visting the
South Texas Gardens in the morn
ing, attending a conference of Val
ley cane growers in the afternoon.
In the evening he was a guest at a
banquet in Matamoros.
Only general questions were dis
cussed by the growers at the meet
ing held in the afternoon. Mr.
Orton expressed himself as being
well pleased with the grounds and
the general plan of arrangements of
the government station at ”he fort.
The dinner at Darrousette last
evening, was given by Messrs.
Thrower and Head of this city.
removes a danger which has long
loomed on the political horizon.
After Reyes, Diaz was regarded as
the man who could wield the great
est influene with he people and the
army.
DIAZ DOWNFALL
CAUSES SURPRISE
Wa^neton Infer* that Diaz Will be
Treated Leniently—Outcome Fav
orable to Madero.
By Associated Pres .
Washington. D. C., Oct. 23.—The
news of the recapture of Vera Cruz
by the Mexican federal forces and
the surrender of Felix Diaz and
staff, with practically no show of
resistance, was received with aston
ishment in official circles today.
It Is generally believed that the
event marks the complete suppres
sion of what was looked upou in the
beginning of a general rebellion, in
volving entirely new element?.
A cablegram from American Con
sul Canada confirmed the fact that
the city was retaken.
The extremely courteous language
in which the demand of the surrend
er of Vera Cruz was couched was
taken to indicate that Diaz and the
other officers will be treated with
great leniency.
The downfall of the Diaz move
ment leaves three revolutions in
operation in Mexico, headed respec
tively by Zapata, Gen. Aguilar and
Pagcual Oroaco, jr.. The most ser
ious undertaking is believed to be
the suppression of the Zapatistas.
FANS 60 WILD
IN BOSTON TOWN
WOOD’ SPEAKER AND O BRIEfl
LOUDLY CHEERED
When Wood Let Applause for Bnci
0’Bri<*n,s Solo* Crowd HaU»*d th<
Inc'dent a * Sien of Pe«ce *n Red
Sox CHmp.
By Associated Press.
Special Telegram to the Herald.
| Boston, Mass., Oct. 23.—Ther<
I was a scene of wild excitement lasj
evening in the National 'theatre
When 3100 enthusiastic men and
women temporarily lost their minds
as they sam “Smokey” Joe Wood
the wonderful pitcher of the Ret
Sox, lead the applause with Tris
Speaker from nhe first balcony box
as Buck O’Brien appeared on tht
stage to sing his solo, prior to theii
start for Brownsville, Texas.
I This was proof positive to thf
fans present that there was abso
lutely no friction between Wood and
O’Brien, as certain stories would
have the people of Boston believe.
The uproar was terrible. The spot
light illuminated Wood and Speaker
as they sat in the box. When the
audience recognized the two stars'
jthey broke out in wild yelling and
cheers.
1 As Buck O’Brien finished his song
he waved to the box and smiled.
Joe Wood and Speaker waved back
again and smiled. Those two smiles
one to another told the people what
they had long been waiting for,
here was no friction in the Red Sox
'•amp.
I “Three cheers for ‘Smokey’ Wood"
'and “three cheers for Buck O'Brien"
were heard ail over the house. For
fifteen minutes the excitement con
tinued.
j No game of the world serie* ever
equalled the genuine enthusiasm, as
TTood and Speaker from their boxes.
I were compelled to R’and and bow Jor
1 fully five minutes.
-o-—
Ag*‘ Makps Effic^ncy.
Right on top of the statement of
George F. Baer that at 70 he feels
i more useful to the Reading railroad,
and in the wake of T>r. Wiley’s s’ate
|ment that at 60 a man Is at his best,
comes the hard statement of fact
that Pennsylvania lines have in ac
tive service today more than four
thousand employes who are between
60 and 70 years of age. It is admit
ted that railroads demand efficiency
first of all. and th*t neither “pull”
,nor sentiment would keep these four
thousand men at work unless they
were doing what they are paid for
doing in a manner satsifactory to
[their foremen, their superintendents,
and their directors. Moreover, a
;soon as an employe of the Pennsyl
vania railroad, and of many other
I railroads, finds he is failing he ap
lies for a pension and gets it. There
are on The payroll of the pension li«t
of the Pennsylvania company nearly
five hundred who were retired after
they had given to the corporation
fifty years of honest and faithful
service.—New York Herald.
-o———
Daughter—Mother, why do people
think business will he better after
the election?
Mother—Because then men will
have more time to give to it.—Judge.
IN
£
\ INSTRUCTED TODAY
lx
Attorneys Clo8e Summing Up Y**8
tcrday—Hot Word8 Pass Among
Lawyer8—Bicker Appeared Calm.
lx ________
* By Associated Press.
New York. Oct. 23.—The attor
* tievs in the Becker case concluded
- their summing up this afternoon.
- Tomorrow morning the jury will be
_ charged and the fate of the police
r lieutenant, accused of instigating1
. the Rosenthal murder will rest with
them.
; Becker heard himseif character
l ized by John F. McIntyre, his chief
counsel, as the victim of a conspir
' acy plotted by Jack Rose, “the hell
? hound of the assassins,” and by As
: sistant District Attorney Moss as
. "the brains behind the gunmen
. with a tremendous motive for mur
der.” He sat with almost immovable
: countenance throughout.
McIntyre charged that District
Attorney Whitman, actuated by am
■ 'bition, fathered the prosecu ion
-framed by crooks.
Moss resented the implication and
denounced the vinification of coun
sel for the defense. He accused Mc
* Intyre with misrepresenting the evi
: dence *o the jury.
McIntyre shook his fist fn the
. face of Moss and uttered an indig
nant denial.
-*
Sail Bo«t Found.
: i —
A large sail boat, w’ith three large
stars painted on the stern, is re
ported as having been found tossed
■ upon the shore at the mouth of the
- Rio Grande, on the American side.
. Several Mexicans in the employ of
. ’he Brownsville fish company, have
confirmed the rumor. But except
for the stars mentioned, no descrip
tion of the boat or marks of identifi
cation are forthcoming.
CONTINUED SUCCESS
OF ALLIED ARMIES
SERVIAN ADVANCE IS TRIUMPH
ANT SO FAR
Bulgarians Closing in on Adrianople
Capturing Several Forts—Greek"
Take Town of Servia* Cutting Off
Retreat of Turk*sh Army.
By Associated Press.
I Loudon. Eng.. Oct. 23.—News
from the seat of war tn the Balkans
tonight tells of the continued suc
jcess of the allies.
j The Servians have captured Novi
,pazar and are virtually masters of
I Kumanova. The victories, how
were purchased by a heavy sacrifice.
A great battle is being fought be
fore Adrianople, upon which the
Bulgarians are gradually closing in.
Already the two outer forts have
fallen. It is significant that the
Constantinople dispatches tonight
■have a less confident tone regarding
Adrianople.
An Athens dispatch says that the
flreeks have occupied the town of
Scrvia aid the retreat of the Turks
has been cut off.
information concerning the Mon
tenegrins progress is meager.
The Turkish authorities claim
that Scutari has been reinforced
and is safe.
A Saloniki dispath says the Malis
sorio tribes are offended because the
Montenegrin commanders proclamed
the soverigniy of King Nicholas in
the captured Albanian towns, it is
reported that the tribesmen are re
fusing to continue to fight for the
Montenegrins.
-Wi
Twenty-five per cent of industrial
accidents, it is estimated, are due to
insufficient illumination.
-$
Long island has a school in which
forty women are learning to become
carpenters and bricklayers.
SAN BENITO
I < THE
1 BIG CANAL T( IWN
The livest and largest new town in Texas in the
LOWER RIO GRANDE VALLEY
San Benito has grown from nothing to over four thousand population la
four years and today offers best location for commercial and In
dustrial nterprises in Southwest Texas. Natural advantages
and Improvements already made insure city of importance.
The growth and development have only, started
NEARLY HALF A MILLION
Dollars railrc d business on St. Loui a. Brownsville and Mexico KaMwsj
j at San Benito, in one year. Sixty-seven per coni Wreaae ov«r buslneat
of previous year.
! Tear ending April 30th 1911 1912
Freight received 142,819.44 235,880.20
Freight forwarded 42,839.33 96,100.31
Express received 12,539.64 15,426.23
Express forwarded 18,098.34 19,025.44
Ticket sales 31,460.95 43,960.66
Excess Baggage 292.28 478.70
Switching, storage, and
demurrage No record 3,204.11
Total Value of Business 248,050.95 414,075.85
Above represents only the amount paid to the St. L. B. & M. for hand*
j ling businese shown and NOT THE VALUE OF PRODUCTS HANDLED,
EIGHTY THOUSAND ACRES OF RICH DELTA SOIL
Irrigated from the big San Benito Canal surround the town of San Be
nito. Twenty-five thousand acres already in cultivation.
INTERURBAN RAILROAD NOW IN OPERATION
over 40,000 acres of this tract serving every farm with convenient
freight and express service. Extens ion being made on the balance of
the tract. Rio Hondo, Santa Maria, t’arricitos, Los Indios and La Paloma
on 4nterurban road out of San Benito. Convenient schedule.
IT WILL PAY YOU TO INVESTIGATE SAN BENITO
before engaging in farming, commercial or industrial enterprises sis#*
where in Texas.
SAN BENITO UNO & WATER COMPANY.
SIN BENITO. TEXIS.
I --—
KO • PRES • KO - KAKE
Means Profit and Economy
TO CATTLE FEEDERS
Call at our New Oil Mill and let us convince you
First 50000 pounds fold to T. J. Lawson,
of this city.
We continue to manufacture the
best Ice obtainable.
! PEOPLES ICE AND MANUFACTURING CO.

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