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Brownsville herald. [volume] (Brownsville, Tex.) 1910-current, December 24, 1912, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of North Texas; Denton, TX

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063730/1912-12-24/ed-1/seq-1/

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ELECTRIC PERCOLATORS f l * w ELECTRIC HOG
Irons, Chafing Dishes, Air Heat- ■ M jk # W ^k # B ■ W B *'<> B Jk W ■ Fence, Poultry Netting
ers and Warming Pads. B^^ Bl^ B B I J I B B^ B-11^ B^ |IC / B | A and Sheep Fence.
BROWNSVILLE HARDWARE CO. » ▼ All*J V M. 1.^ 1 ili * BROWNSVILLE HARDWARE CD
<"TrESRA^^ ~Tkitf fiyf <Tats
JOINTLY CHARGED WITH CON
SIMRACY IN VIOLATION OF SUER
MAN ANTI TRUST LAY BY NEW
YORK GRAND JURY.
MANAGER OF GRAND TRUNK
LNE OF CANADA IS ONE OF THE j
OFFICIALS NAMED IN CIIARG ;
ES.
(Bi/ A sso via toil Pros*.)
Now York N. Y. Doc. 23.—Charles IT. t
Mellon, President of tin* New York.
New Haven ami Hartford Railroad, Ed-j
son J. Chamberlain, President of the
Grand Trunk road of Canada, and Al
bert W. Smithers of the Hoard of Direc
Tors of the Grand Trunk were jointly
in dieted in this city today under the
Sherman antitrust law.
They are charged with conspiring to
restrain trade in connection with an
alleged agreement in which the Grand
Trunk proposed to abandon tin* con
struction of a line to Providence R. I.,
together with a projected steamship
line from Providence to New York. The
penalty is one year in jail, or five thou
sand dollars fine.
Proof has reached Loudon that Aus
tria Hungary is mobilizing an army. Aus
trian and Hungarian residents here have
been called to the colors.
GENERAL BLANCO
TAKEN BY REBELS
MEXICAN CITY OF CASAS GRAND
FS CAPTURED BY BAND OF RE
RELS UNDER COMMAND OF OR
OZ< O.
FEDERAL GENERAL BLANCO,
MARCIING TO ASCESION. WITH
RELIEF COLUMN IS REPORTED
DEFEATED AND PRISONER.
(Hi/ Associated Press.)
El Paso, Tex. Dee. 2d.—Casas Gratides
the most important town in the ranch
ing and lumbering district southwest
of .Juarez, has been taken by rets*Is
personally commanded by Col. Pascual
Orosfco, dr.
It was report(*d today from official
sources that a column of (it* federals
marching against the rebels at Ascen
sion was defeated and the federal com
mauder Gen. Jose Blanco, was captured.
MOTHER KILLED BY JOY.
Sherman. Tex. Dec. 2J.—Joy over the
unexpected return of her son who came
home to spend Christmas caused the
death last night of Mrs. A. II. Hickman
When her son walked into the house,
tin* happiness over his arrival gave way
to an attack of nervousness and Mrs.
Hickman died within five hours. Three
months ago, Fitch Ilicliman. t-ln* son
lost his wife and ons child in a fin* on
his ranch in Montana.
I
Hinkley Auto Company
Brownsville, Texas.
!
~ :
1 THE SAINT ANTHONY |
1 SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS t£i
«|j Always strictly first class and appreciates the patronage of the good T
^Jl people from all localities. Our references are the people w’ho have *
heen our guests. Ask them, as they always come back. ^
-j| THE SAN ANTHONY HOTEL CO. jl
*11 F. W. Swearingen, Pres. ff»
41 , , r {•
____ I
8. a. & a. p. | i , s. a. & A. P.
TO
SAN ANTONIO
without change of cars
Via
CORPUS CHRISTI AND
SAN ANTONIO AND ARANSAS PASS RAILWAY.
j Lv Brownsville 4:00 p. m. Ar. San Antonio 7:10 a. m.
RETURNING.
Lv. San Antonio 9:25 p. m. Ar. Brownsville 12:15 p. m.
He sure to ask for tickets via Corpus Christi and S. A. A. P. Ry.
GEO. F. LUPTON, G. P. A.
San Antonio,
8. A. & A. P. S. A. & A. P.
I WHILE IN THE VALLEY I
DON’T FAIL TO VISIT |
.^MISSION 1
Elevation, 1 4 o feet. 1
„ Irrigation, unexcelled.
I Drainage, natural. U
i WE PROVE IT.
J5 To be the most progressive, high- |
ly develooed, prosperous, thriv- |
ing proposition in the Lower Rio p
Grande Valley. |
A oersonal investigation will con* U
p vince you of the greater advan- |
tages and opportunities offered. I
| MISSION LAND IMPROVEMENT COMPANY
MISSION, TEXAS
JOHN J. CONyVAY
Preiidtnt V Sole Own.. <
SIDE CITY SCHOOLS
[ SHALL NOT STOP
SCHOOL BOARD WILL MAXDAM
CS CITY COUNCIL TO FORCE EN
ACTMENT OF 20 CENT TAX LEVY
FOR SCHOOLS.
CITY FINANCIAL REPORT TO BE
PUBLISHED AND OPPOSITION
TO GENERAL TAX LEVY MAY BE
WITHDRAWN.
The Brownsville school board will
man dan ur the city council, for the pur
pose of forcing it to pass a levy to raise
[funds for the operation of the public
schools of the city. The general eitv tax *
includes a twenty per cent levy for the 1
benefit of the schools, and this is what ]
the school board wants for the operation .
of the city's educational institutions. A (
vote by the council on the question of
passing tin* twenty |>er cent levy for the ‘
schools alone failed to carry, and Hon. '
F. W. Seaburv. a member of the school 1
board, stated to the council that the
board would go before tin* district court ^
for a writ of mandanus.
Mr. Seaburv, before the vote on the 1
question was taken, appeared before the *
council and stated that he, Judge J. A. s
Graham ami Judge Frank C. Pierce, the e
latter also a member of the board, had
looked into tin* matter and found that ]
there is nothing to prohibit the council
from passing a portion of tin* whole levy rj
for the support of the schools. lie said
the voting of this tax would not affect n
tin* balance of the proposed city tax levy, ^
upon tin* passing of which there has been
a deadlock in the council the past sev- t
eral weeks. ],
Alderman II. J.-Kirk, speaking from A
what lie termed the minority in tin* eoun a
cil, said he had been informed that it [ S
would be almost impossible for the eoun t<
cil to vote the school tax without voting ]•
the balance of the tax. and in that east n
lie felt that he would Is* forced to vote t
against the passing of a twenty per cent n
levy.
Alderman Uobolini. who has objected v
to certain expenditures by* the school s
board, notably one of the $3,000 paid to
school teaachers who attended the state c
normal schools last summer, submitted f
a letter lie received from State Superin- a
tendent of Public Instruction F. M. Bnil d
ley of Ausin, in response to a query sent I<
attorney general by Mr. Cobolini. It
follows. t
“In response to your letter of Novem- 1
ber 23. which was addressed to the attor
nev general, and by him referred to this •
department, T licg to advise that the f
school laws of this state at the present 1
time do not require teachers to attend t
state normals and summer normal in 1
stitutes. The law does require teachers *
of the public schools to attend the coun
ty teacher's institutes, and ir provides
that they shall receive their salaries for
the time lost in attendance upon said
county teachers* institutes.’*
Alderman C. II. Thorn moved the levy '
of a twenty per cent tax for school pur
poses. On this Aldermen Cain. Thorn. '
Crixell and Benavides voted aye. and '
Aldermmen Browne. Cobolini and Kirk '
voted nay. The motion was lost, a two
thirds majority of the entire council be- j
ing required 4o pass a tax levy.
Mr Seaburv then informed them that
the next proceeding would be before the
district court, where the school board
will apply for a writ of mandamus, for.
Mr. Seaburv said. “The city schools shall
not stop.”
T1IK PAVEMENT MATTER.
City Attorney T. A. Kinder submitted
to the council an ordinaanee covering
the levying of assessments ngaainst prop
•erty owners for pavements in paving dis
tricts 1. 2 and 3. The ordinance was ad
opted with the favorable vote of Aider
men Benaavides, Crixell, Cain, and
Thorne. Alderman Cobolini and Browne
voted against its adoption, and Alder (
man Kirk did not vote, though he stated
that personally he wants to pay his por
tion of the cost of the paving.
The voting of the council was still
more at odds when Alderman Cain in-,
troduced a resolution authorizing the
paving company to complete the pav-:
ing partly done on 11th street, face-i
ing the City Hall and City Market.
The concrete is laid, and the tracks of
j the street car company are projecting j
high above it, precluding the possibi-1
lity of travel. Alderman Crixell mov
ed its adoption; he was seconded by
Alderman Benavides. These two and
Alderman Cain voted to adopt the re
solution, and Aldermen Cobolini and
Browne voted against it. Aldermen
Kirk and Thorn did not vote on the
resolution.
FINANCIAL REPORT TO BE PUBLISHED
The council apparently “got t»get
DEMANDS OF MIES
MADE 10 OTTOMANS
AMOUNT VIRTUALLY TO THU AN
NIDILATION OF THE TURKISH
EMPIRE IN THE EAST OF EF
ROPE.
INVOLVES THE CESSION TO
GREECE OF CRETE AN1> THE
AEGEAN ISLANDS. CONFERENCE
ADJOURNS TILL SATURDAY.
(lhf A ssorinhd I’n xs.)
London. Dec. 23.—After many days o
kirmishing. the Turkish delegates toda
aced a real attack of the allied Hal
;an States at the fifth sitting of tin
•eace conference, and the victorious
lilies* laid their most important card
'it the table in the form of territoria
onditions which they have agreed ti
in pose upon the vanquished Ottomans
'heir demands are:
First, the cession by Turkey of nl
territory west of a point near Khodcsi;
n the Sea of Marmora to the Ray of
lalatra on the Black Sea. excluding
trotuk to be decided by the Great Pow
rs.
Second, the cession of the Aegean Is
indx, occupied by Greece.
Third, the cession to Greece of all
'urkish rights on the Island of Crete.
The allies did not reveal today the ti
uncial proposals they will make to Tin
ey. Before the allies presented their sp
ideations, ithc Turks announced thai
liey were ready to make negotiations
•aving the question of the provisioning
.drinnople to lie settled with Bulgaria
ml abandoning the request to rcvictual
eutari and Janiua. The Turks listened
> the proclamation of the fate of tlicit
timpean empire without a formal eon:
lent and asked for an adjournment tin
I Saturday to consider the allies tie
lands.
Tatter, the Turks asserted that* it
■ould be impossible for them to meet
itch terms.
The atmosphere of the stately conn
il chamber was charged with intonsi
•cling throughout the session, beeaust
II recognized that the negotiations art
esigned to change the map of modern
at rope.
The Turkish delegates iinnottneed that
hey were empowered to treat with all
he allies. Greece not excepted.
The opinion here among the diplomats
< that Peace ultimately will be eon
I tided in spite of the grave differences
etween the allies demands nand objec
ions on the part of the Turks to give
ip such a vast empire as the Balkan
States demand.
THE MARKET REPORT.

I />// A xxociiilal /Yr.v.O
Kansas City Mo.. Dee. 23,.—Cattle re
'cipts 7.8AM) including 3AM) Southern:
it to 25 cents higher: southern steers
14.75 to $7.25: Hogs receipts 7,000: 5 v
ligher. Sheep receipts 3.AMM1. 1A) to 15
•cuts higher.
ier” on the last proposition brought
Defore it. Mayor Cole suggested a
notion by some member authorizing
the finance committee to prepare and
publish a financial report of the city’s
financial shape for the year up to and
ncluding April 30, ult.-a report that
would “meet the requirements of the
law and Mr. Cobolini,” as the mayor
expressed it.
Acquiescing in the mayor’s sugges
tion, Alderman Cain made the m >
tion. It received a second by Alder
man Thorn. Though there was not a
single “No” against the motion, the
mly audible “Aye” was that c
Alderman Cobolini.
This is the report which has been
desired by Aldermen Cobolini, Kirk
and Browne, commpnly termed tht
minority of the council, who havA
steadfastly voted against the passinf
of the city’s tex levy, on account o
failure to prepare such a report.
If the report meets the requirement:
of these alderman, it is expected then
will be no further delay in voting th<
city tax levy.
A. Dittman was granted a permi
by the council the reconstruct th«
building at 1115 Elizabeth street fo
the purpose of establishing therein :
motion picture theater.
Martin Hanson submitted for thi
council’s consideration two bills, on*
for $107.50 for work on the city hall
and $138 63 for constructing cells ii
the new city jail.
t
COUNTY TEACHERS INSTITUTE
FORTY FOI L* IXSTKIVTOKK OF
rOFXTY SCHOOLS aiif attend
1X0 INTERESTING PROGRAM
EACH DAY.
Today the Cameron County teach
ers’institute will enter the third day
of the meeting. Subjects to be taken
up will include mathematics in the
primary grades, geography, the ad
vantage of introducing manual train
ng and domestic science work in the
public schools, and the importance of
discipline and the best methods of
enforcing it. Among those who will
ead the talks will be Mabel H. Har
rison, Clella B. Burns, Maud Johnson,
May Scmlan, Lulu Champion, Lucille
Smith, Prof, C. S. Witsaman, Pearl
Botts, Nellie Barney, Josephine John
son, Bessie C. McKinley and Mrs.
Lillian M. Smith.
Yesterday afternoon M. E. Tracy
lectured to the teachers on tl e Taj
Mahal, the famous memorial building
erected in India some 300 years ago.
Mr. Tracy lectured on this subject to
various literary clubs of the city Te
cently, and it was considered one of
the most interesting and enlightening
lectures ever heard in Brownsville.
The teachers likewise appreciated his
effort, and were deeply interested in
the subject. Mr. Tracy consented to
lecture for the benelit of the teachers
on invitation of J. T. Canales, county
superintendent of instruction.
The institute opened Saturday morn
ing at the high school, with an ad
dress of welcome by Mayor A. B.
Cole. Mr. Canales also addressed the
teachers, after which regular organ
ization was gone into. Mrs. Melvina
Jagou was elected secretary of the
institute. Forty four teachers are
attending the iustitute.
LIBERTY BELL'S ROUTE HOME
NORTH WFST STA I RS WANT IT TO
PASS THAT WAV.
Spokane. Wash., Dee. 22. Western
patriotism irom Chicago to Portland,
Ore., is being amused in a campaign to
have the Liberty Hell shipped bark to
Pllilu'iclpthia from the San Francisco
exposition by tin* northern route, giv
ing tiie |K*ople of Oregon. Washington,
Idaho. Montana. North Dakota, .Miline
sot a. Wisconsin, Illinois. Indiana and
Ohio an opportunity to net as a host to
the Revolutionary relie.
Secretary Harry P. Wuertli of tin*
Spokane Chamber of Commerce will
start December 12 the circulation of
(trtitions in the state of Washington,
at the same time requesting united ac
tion by chandlers of commerce and comm
ercial cluli in every town and citv of the
slates just named.' Follow ing the ex
ample of Sail Francisco which is wag
ing a determined tight to bring tluj
Liberty Hell to the Panama Pacific In
teruatioiial exposition in 22.*i.iNMI
school children of Washington will
sign petitions requesting that the bell
be returned by the northern route.
In litis state the petitions will lie
signed also by citizens generally, the
mark set being 1.IMMUM0 signatures in
the state of Washington. ‘ If the Lilier
tv Hell is sen! west in P.llo it will be
just as easy to return it cast by tin*
northern route sis by tin* southern."
stated Secretary Wcurtli of the chain
her of commerce. “The lesson in patri
otism it would teach all along the lines
would be well worth the effort expend
ed in showing the liell to milliins of
people in the northwest.’*
A machine that threshes grain as It
stands inn field has ben invented by
Kansan.
r SAN BENITO I
j; THE ■
| BIG CANAL TOWN f
The livest and largest new town in Texas in the
LOWER RIO GRANDE VALLEY
Sau Benito has grown from nothing to over four thousand population in
four years and today offers best location for commercial and in
j dustrial nterprises in Southwest Texas. Natural advantage*
and improvements already made insure city of Import noe
The growth and development have mlv atarted
NEARLY HALF A MILLION
Dollars railrc d business on St. Ism is, Brownsville and i,.nU;.i
at San Beniio, in one year. Sixty-seven per c-»n. 1 ..-reave I; . .
of previous year.
Yar ending’April 20th llll 19»2 ' [
Freight received 14S.SU.44 23:».8*IV?f
j I Freight forwarded 42,839.S3 96.100 M
Ex press recei ved 12,539 6 4 1 5,4 V 6 2
Express forwarded fs.09S.24 19,025.4 1
Ticket sales 31,460.95 43,960.66
Excess Baggage 292.25 478.70 ;ji
Switching, storage, and
(. demurrage No record 3,204.11
Total Value of BusineM 248,050.95 414,075.65
Above represents only the amount paid to the St. L. 11. K- M. for hand
ling business shown and NOT THE VALUE OF PRODUCTS HANDLED
Eighty Thousand Acres of Rich Delta Soil
irrigated from the big San Benito Canal surround the town of San Bw
nitp. Twenty-live thousand acres already in cultivation.
| Interurban Railroad Now in Progress
over 40,000 acre* of this tract serving every farm with convenient
freight and express service. Extension being made on the balance of
the tract. Rio Hondo, Santa Maria, Carrieltoe, I»s lndlos and la Paloma
on Interurban road eut of San Benito. Convenient schedule.
It will Pay you to Investigate San Henito
before engaging In farming, commercial or industrial en erprlses elsa
J.‘ BENITO LjjNH1IER |
: ---
■ m i^li- fl ■ • • •« 9- 9-If r • . MMMMMNWW) ■■ If II f l ■■■■ i HM| <► "•» ■■llfl ■■ ■» ■■■■<» >•» 9‘- m» 9 Ifil |H—<■>»■ »—•" wait" ft*
.. . ^ r i- -»■- ■ an ima ■, r r — 4*. mgm • **aJ**» iwA m •« mi m»
KO-PRES-KO-KAKE
i ;*
Means Profit and Economy
1 H TO CATTLE FEEDERS:
S H # 11
r d CalJ at our New Oil Mill and let us convince you.
4 -•
4 * First*5000 pounds sold to T. J. Lawson, of this city.
j r* * . . u
We continue to manufacture the best ice obtainable.
■i| PEOPLES ICE AND MANUFACTURING CO
I J m J> \
—--.--•--—...... ITv-vruf
4 « •... . I

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