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Brownsville herald. [volume] (Brownsville, Tex.) 1910-current, July 29, 1928, SOCIETY, Image 15

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063730/1928-07-29/ed-1/seq-15/

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A Short Routine
for You to
Follow Before
You Retire
These Photos Posed
by Miss Huddleston.
Her Health,
Heart and
Home Page
i
Comb the Hair ,V' I
1 Down Until All
I Tangle Are Out,
y Then Set the Waves
Neatly in Place
M Before Retiring.
By Josephine Huddleston.
NIGHT, rather than morning,
is the time for every woman
to worry about keeping her
beauty or developing beauty if she
hasn’t got it.
The very first thing to do is to
remove all trace of makeup from
the skin. I don’t care how late you
come in or how sleepy you are
take off your make-up if you don’t
do anvthing else! The pores should
be cleansed so that they may
breathe freely during the night if
the skin is to appear fresh and
sparkling in the morning.
We’ve had a lot to say about
cleansing creams so I’ll be as brief
as possible regarding their use. If
your skin is very dry use a
cleansing cream that it rich in oils*
so that corrective values will be
had as well as cleansing virtues:
If your skin is inclined to be oily
use a cleansing cream that has
been especially prepared for the
oily type of skins.
Two applications of cream are
required to thoroughly cleanse the
akin: first a generous amount is
massaged into the face and re
moved, then a scant amount is
massaged into the skin and re
moved. You’ll be amazed at the
amount of dirt that comes off with
that second application and it is
this second application that really
removed the dirt*from the pores,
the first serving to remove and
loosen surface impurities.
Next comes the patting on of an
astringent to help keep the skin
and tissues firm, so that sagging
and loose skin is avoided. A boric
acid bath for the eyes is splendid
if the eyes are tired, or if they
burn from dust being blown into
them. Fill an eye cup with the
boric acid solution, hold it firmly
to the eye. tilt the head backward,
then wink the eyelid back and
forth rapidly. Repeat with the
other eye.
, This much should be done by
every woman before retiring. The
more lengthy beautifying process
depends on the needs and desires
of the individual. . .also. . .a great
deal depends upon whether or not
she is too lazy or too tired to take
the full treatment.
In the present day popularity
0 SWhatsTlext millions?
By BETTY BROWNLEE
(Famous Fashion Expert)
LTHOUGH red fox has never
seemed in frightfully good
—1 taste to me—it’s sort of
blatant and showy—the fact re
mains, that designers are using a
great deal these Summer days to
trim fussy afternoon ensembles
and evening wraps. So don’t let
my prejudice keep you away from
it, if you happen to like it. As
the vaudeville team remarked in
the statement that is sure to go
down in literature—“Maybe I
shouldn't have mentioned it.”
For red fox is most certainly
popular in-Summer fur3—running
a close second t* the more beauti
ful (and more expensive) silver
fox. And every once in awhile,
it is used so tastefully on a wrap
that even I like it.
For instance, just the other day,
running in and out of the New
York shops, hot on the trail of
new styles and accessories about
which to pass on information in
this department, I saw a perfectly
delightful evening wrap whose
deep shawl collar was edged with
a band of red fox that was ex
quisitely marked and looked no
end rich against the transparent
sapphire velvet of the wrap.
It was a three-quarter length
model, slightly longer in back than
^JP in front, and draped gracefully in
Tawny Red Fox Edges This
.Attractive Evening Coat of
Transparent Blue Velvet.
wrap-around style. Clever tuck
Ings at the collar back moulded
the cape beautifully. A circular
flare of velvet was hung at centre
back underneath the collar to trail
to a full twelve inches below the
line of the coat.
$ ^jooq Manners in business
By Social Secretary.
AT just about this time a flock
of college graduates, armed
with their new diplomas, are
setting out to conquer the world.
There is no reason why they
shouldn’t do just that. But a lot
of them are going to put a lot of
unnecessary obstacles in their own
way. And then wonder why they
don't get ahead any faster.
The trouble with a lot of these
youngsters is that they have spent
four years hearing that they are the
flower of the coming generation
and that on their shoulders rests
the future of this country. Of
coarse, that’s true to a certain ex
tent. But it’s not entirely true. And
when such talk leads a college
student to feel that he is superior
to the person who hasn’t be**n to
college and that his degree should
antitie him to special consideration
is the business world, it’s all wrong.
What the college graduate must
m
remember is that his education
has given him exactly nothing in
the knowledge of how to run a
business. It will do him a great
deal of good in the long run, if he
remembers that it is only a
foundation on which he can build
firmly and successfully. When
he takes his first job, he will find
that he is mingling with people
who have spent years in learning
their jobs. Why should he expect
to be able to make himself as
valuable to an organization as
they are in less time? It can’t be
done. The graduate, whether a
He or a She, should remember that
he is only a freshman again.
Freshmen don’t high-hat upper
classmen and expect to get away
with it. You can’t get away with
it in business either.
You’ll find that your associates
will gladly help you out if you
are sincerely anxious to learn. But
heaven help the smart-aleck and
the know-it-all 1
Spread Out the Net Sleeping Cap and Slip It Over the Head Without
Disarranging the Hair.
for the finger wave, something
must be done to preserve its trim
outline if the full benefit of the
money expended for this beautiful
type of wave is to be had. We
all know that turning and tossing
is hard on the wave, frequently
bringing about an effect of ends
shooting out in all directions in
stead of the perfectly coiffed con
tour with which we went to bed.
A simple expedient for this
Tuck Under All the
Stray Ends of
Hair so That the
Coiffure Will Stay
In Place Properly
as Shown Above.
trouble is the clever little sleeping
caps which are inexpensive and
decorative at the same time—to
say nothing of their virtue in the
way of keeping hair in place no
matter how much twisting and
turning of the head is done.
I think the sleeping cap is pref
erable to ordinary hair nets as
the hair nets must be pinned, and
are delicate and apt to become dis
arranged, and hairpins are danger
ous things to have in the hair
during sleep.
Comb the hair down neatly, so
Gets 9lau House
An Intriguing Story of
Young Love and
Modern Business.
By FLORENCE W. ROSS.
CHAPTER X.
THE SUN invaded a tiny bed
room in a brownstone house
that was exactly like every
other bedroom in every other
brownstone house in any city of
these United States. With this
difference: That the two young
people occupying it on this par
ticular morning were lifted above
the common plane through the
force of their own happiness. On
their sleeping faces the amiable
sunshine revealed tranquillity and
mutual faith.
At seven-thirty a voice mur
mured, “Jerry, darling, this is the
last time I’m going to call you.
We’ll be terriDly late.” Jerry
opened his eyes and blinked. “Oh!
It’s you, Mrs. Renard. Good
morning.” And he wafted a sleepy
kiss in ner direction. The kiss was
smothered in pillows and rumpled
blankets, for Barbara had de
termined to make her newly
wedded husband get out of bed.
Followed hasty and refreshing
showers, a quick breakfast and the
usual silly things honeymooners
say to each other when there are
more important things to do. Then
they separated, Jerry to the bus
line and Barbara to take the street
car. For they had decided it was
foolish to tempt fate, and, while
none of their associates lived near
by, it was wiser to be cautions.
When Barbara closed the door
of the brownstone house behind
her she glanced warily to both
sides of the street and then sped
down the steps like a runaway
prisoner. “Funny business, this.”
she thought. “Anyone watching
me would think I had just commit
ted a theft, or some other sin.”
One in her office she felt safe
from detecting eyes, and no one
would have guessed that she had
just embarked on the most thrill
ing honeymoon ever devised by
man. Byrdon, watching her tran
scribe her notes deftly and effi
ciently would probably have ex
ploded in a fit of jealousy if he
had known the truth. For Bar
bara had made an impression on
him not to be easily removed. She
brought into his life a freshness
and a buoyancy that carried him
back to his own happy youth, and
he would not have parted with her
for a fortune.
But as he stood at the door of
his office watching her work he saw
an office boy lay a folded note on
her desk. He recognized the paper
—it was an office letterhead, and
instantly he knew it came from
Gerald Renard. He saw Barbara
open the note hastily. As she
read it she smiled and a bright red
spot appeared in each cheek.
Just then she stood up. Byrdon
hastily turned away, but his
quick confusion was not lost upon
Babs. She realized her employer
had watched her read the note,
and for a moment she was be
wildered. Did he guess that Jerry
and she were more than friends?
Would he speak to her about it?
She determined, in any case, to
deny the truth and save her job
and Jerry’s.
But she was spared the neces
sity. For Byrdon was too hurt
by the thought of Barbara’s indif
ference to him to reproach her.
Ha called her into his office and
T>ARBARA DONNES AND
D GERALD RENARD.
both in the employ of Joha
Byrdon. are married. They
plan to keep it a secret from
the world, and especially from
Mrs. Donnes. Barbara’s
widowed mother, who thinks
all men are rotters. On the
Sunday they have set aside
for apartment hunting Bar
bara spend* the day with her
employer, who is eery fond
of her. She rneels her hus
band that evening in the
apartment he has taken, and
they spend the night there.
No One In the Office Would Have
Guessed That Barbara Had Just
Embarked on a Thrilling
Honeymoon and Byrdon Would
Hare Exploded in a Fit of
Jealousy Had He Known the
Truth.
i 1 .—.
"Barbara” Poaod by Maryland
Jarbaau. Courtesy of David Balasco.
continued the morning dictation,
fiving no . ,:n of his emotional
isturbance. Wihen he had fin
ished he merely said, “That will
be all for the time being,' Miss
Donnes," and turned to leave the
room.
While he was gone Barbara re
membered she had not phoned her
mother to explain her absence.
Hastily she called the number. “I
spent the night at Doris Cole’s
home," she lied, “but I’ll be home
early this evening." Then she
scribbled an answer to Jerry’s
note. "Cannot come tonight.
Mother will be worried. Stop
writing notes in office. Byrdon’s
suspicions aroused. You darling.”
She giggled as she went over
her plans to quiet her employer’s
suspicions.
(To Bo Continaad.)
Appetizing Menus for the Week
MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY
Breakfast Breakfast Breakfast Breakfast Breakfast Breakfast Breakfast
Blackberries, Cantaloupe, Bananas ind Oranpe Juice, Strawberries, Stewed Rhubarb. Honeydew Melon.
Farina,* Toasted Muffins. Cream, Pineapple Fritters. Shr^ded Wheat Boiled Eggs, Ham Omelet,
Toast. Jam, Griddle Cakes, Cocoa. *” Coco'a*™' Brown Bread.
Coffee. Cocoa. Maple Syrup, Luncheon Luncheon Coffe€- Dinner
Luncheon Luncheon Coffee. Alligator Pear s,uffed-E Luncheon
Poached Egg* Asparagus Salad. Luncheon Salad with Salad ^ Artichoke Salad, Roas^ Lamb*
on Tom at. Minced Chicken Mushrooma Chopped Nuts, Mayonnaise. Toast, Mashed PotakUs,
Watercress Salad, Sandwiches. on Toast, Date Muffins. Strawberries, Cookies, Baked Carrots,
French Pastry, Gingersnaps, Fruit Salad, Cold Beverage. Asparagus
Tea- Milk. Cup Cake., Dinner Dinner Dinner V.n.igrett.
Dinner Dinner Tea. Beef Broth. Soup. ,
Conwmme, Fricas.ee of Veal Dinner Broiled Baked Whitefish, BoiW.^oked W.fcT
Beef Tongue widi Noodles. Rice Soup. Tenderloin Steak, Potatoes. New** C^bbsge Bupper
Brown Gravy, Dressed Pork Chops, Fried Sweets, Green Peas, and Potatoes, Potato Salad
Mashed Potatoes, Cucumber Baked Potatoes, Green Cora, Roraaine Salad, Celery and with Chopped
C*Brow7 Salad. Summer Squash, Tomato and Fruit Salad Men Eg,..
Brown Betty u , r, n . , , , , „ c , , Pudiag. Cup Custard, Cold Ham,
Pudding , MocH. aka. noting Wand. Lettuce Salad, Cookies, Lady F.ngers, Ra.pberry
Cot fee. DrmMttM. Coffee, Demi* teiie* Coffee* Demi-tute. Shortcake, Te^
* Favorite Recipe of the Week—Brown Betty Pudding.
tX)UR cupful* diced apples. 1% cupful* of butter, 1 cupful* of auger, 1 teanpoonful allspic*. Mix together
L teanpoonful nutmeg, 6 cupful* of bread crumbs, 2^ and cook slowly. Sarve with hard anuoa.
Apply a Good Tissue-Building Cream Around the Eyes and Along the
Lines from the Nose to Mouth to Prevent Wrinkles.
that it is all untangled, then set
the waves in place with the comb
or by pushing them up gently with
the hands. When each wave is in
its right place, spread out the net
sleeping cap over the hands, slip
it carefully over the head, tie the
ribbon ends securely and that is
that Some of the caps have snap
Eers for holding, instead of rib
ons to tie, but the result is the
same, of course.
Tuck up the ends of the hair so
that they, too, are out of harm’s
wav and then retire, knowing that
your wave will be as lovely in the
I " ""_
morning as though it had just been
set.
A soothing and healing lotion
should be applied to the lips to
keep them soft and smooth and
the same preparation can be used
on the bands for the same pur
pose.
Next week well continue this
article, as I’m running short of
space, and no night-time beauty
treatment is complete without
some euggestions regarding the
windows, so that plenty of fresh
air comes into the sleeping quar
ters.
zAq "Bulletin "Board
By MARY D. WILSON.
DfiAn MRS. WILSON:
I have recently moved into a
new house and the ants oj all sixes
are about to take possession of it.
Please tell me how / con rid the
place of them. Thanking you t» ad
vance, / am very respectfully,
MRS. W. A- /.
I’m afraid you're in for a
•truggle, for anta are hard to elim
inate. But you can do it if you
have the patience. Find the ant
hills if you can, and inject kero
sene into them. Then close them
tightly with cotton soaked in kero
sene. Soak some sponges in sweet
ened water. The ants will collect
on them. Then drop them in boil
ing water. This, if repeated often,
will get rid of them. Then spread
borax on your shelves. Or ir you
want to use a poison, tartar emetic
is as safe as any. I have found
that to be particularly effeciive
against the little red ants. But if
you have any pete be careful that
they can’t get at it.
Dear mrs. wilson:
/ have just had my fur coat
cleaned and want to store it at
home. Have you any suggestions
or information that would be of
assistance to met Very truly yours,
A. L. T).
I’d hate to take the responsibil
ity for saying that anv of these
suggestions are sure to keep moths
out, for sometimes they get in no
matter what you can do. But these
are all good preventatives. If you
have a cedar closet or cedar chest,
put the furs in that If you don’t
care to use moth balls, sprinkle
black pepper thoroughly through
the furs, and keep them in dark
ness. Or sprinkle tobacco all
through the furs and wrap them in
newspapers. If you haven't a cedar
chest, line a box with newspapers,
— -. —.—
and spray it with one of the com
mercial liquids sold for that pur
pose. Then pack the chest and
spray the clothes.
■ •
Dear mrs. wilson.
I wonder if you could help me
by offering suggestions as to re
papering my house. It is a bunga
low type, and the rooms are rather
small. What kind of wall paper
do you suggestT MRS. H. W. y.
If the rooms are small, avoid big
splotchy patterns, since they have
a tendency to make the room look
smaller. Stripes make a wall look
higher, and unless they are very
bold, they do not tire one as much
as some of these criss-cross pat
terns that keep you busy picking
them out with unconscious eyes.
For myself. I adore dots, and a
pretty border, for a small room.
Or plain walls with an effective
border. Then the walls are more
a background for pictures and fur
niture. Instead of trying to be con
spicuous In themselves. Yea. ruffled
curtains can be used all over a
house of that type.
DEAR MRS. WILSON:
We have a silk mohair over
stuffed suite in which the moths
have gotten. They made considerable
headway before we discovered them.
Have used the vacuum cleaner, and
put camphor around the crevices,
but ictfhoaf success. Will / have
to use some kind of a disinfectant
—such as used in case of contagious
diseaset MRS. J. H P.
You might try going over the
whole suite with benzine, letting it
run into the crevices where the
moths collect. Benzine is better
than gasoline because the odor
does not remain so long as does
that of gasoline.
In this column each week Mrs.
Mary D. Wilson will answer all
questions concerning the household.
So personal correspondence. Don't
send stamps.
Household Hints
If the clothesline is stretched In
the laundry and the clothes pinned
on it there, and then it is trans
ferred to the out of doors, there
will be less exposure to the cold
and a saving of time in hanging
up clothes.
• • •
Boiled custard curdles because
the mixture is allowed to reach
the boiling point. The mixture
should be stirred over hot water
until it thickens, but it should
never be allowed to reach the boil
ing point, or the eggs will imme
diately curdle.
• • •
The shiny appearance of a suit
of clothes can be removed by rub
bing the material with a piece of
fine black emery cloth. It can be
obtained in any hardware for a
few cents.
• • •
To prevent milk from boiling
over, rub the edge of the saucepan
with butter.
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