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Brownsville herald. [volume] (Brownsville, Tex.) 1910-current, October 10, 1928, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063730/1928-10-10/ed-1/seq-3/

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SMITH MAKES
FIRST STAGE
OF NEW TRIP
Nominee Urged to De
liver Address Be
fore Saturday, But
He Ref wses, Report
NEW YORK, Oct. 10.-4^—Gover
nor Smith starts tonight on a trip
to the southland and its border
states ending with a speech Satur
day night at Louisville.
Reports were prevalent that Chair
man Raskob wanted the democratic
presidential nominee to make at
least one speech before reaching
Kentucky Saturday morning, but it
was doubtful whether he could per
suade him to do so.
As the schedule now stands, the
governor will make only rear plat
form appearances tomorrow and to
morrow night at Richmond, Va., and
Raleigh, Greensboro. Salisbury and
Charlot’e, N. C., and devote Friday
to receptions and conferences witn
prominent democrats at Chattanooga
*nd Nashville, Tenn.
Only One Address
The governor left Albany intend
ing to make only one address this
week and it is believed by those
* close to him that he will stick to
that plan, although he may address
a few informal words of greeting to
well-wishers along the route to Ten
nessee.
The governor arrived in New York
yesterday from Albany at 4:30 p. r.i.
Soon afterward he greeted Frank
lin D* Roosevelt, democratic nominee
for governor of New York, whose
headquarters are in the same hotel
and talked over plans for the cam
paign in this state. Mr. Roosevelt,
who placed Governor Smith in nom
ination at Houston, probably will be
depended upon to campaign up-state
for the national as well as the stat-*
ticket, since the presidential candi
date s present plans call for only two
speeches in New York—in Brooklyn
and New York City—the Friday and
Saturday nights before election.
Kaps Hoover
On hi.* way down the Hudson, the
presidential nominee took a few
shots at Herbert Hoover and Senator
Curtis in connection with their
Muscle Shoals and tariff statements
and indicated he might discuss the
tariff at Louisville.
Asked whether he had read Mr.
Hoover’s statement that he favored
continued government ownership of
Muscle Shoals, the governor said he
had not, but sought further enlight
enment as to what was said about
who would operate the plant. He
was informed that this angle was
not touched upon.
Man Makes Bond
In Liquor Case
Charles C. Peck of Houston, held
following a hearing on a liquor vio
l< lation charge before United States
<om. E. K. Goodrich, was released
from the Cameron county jail Wed
nesday after making $500 bond.
The man’s bond was made in Hous
ton and forwarded to Goodrich after
it had been approved by United
States Com. Winston Mahon of that
city.
_rPeck w&s an-ested along with J.
. fifrht and was charged, jointly
with having attempted to transport
«1 gallons of intoxicants which had
been stored in a rear compartment
of a high-powered roadster.
The men were arrested on the
main street of San Benito by Lieut,
of Police Bill Estes after they had
succeeded in escaping search by
customs offiicals at the Gateway
bridge, it is said.
Wright is still being held in jail
in default of $1000 bond. It is ex
pected that he will make this bond
in the next few days, according to
Harold Jefferds, deputy United
States marshal.
WEATHER SUMMARY
The northeastern low pressure
area has moved off the north Atlan
tic coast and is now replaced by
high pressure, 30*3 inches at
Pittsburgh, Pa., and fair and cooler
weather obtains from the middle
Mississippi \ alley eastward. The
British Columbia “low” has advane-!
ed east-southeast and is now cen-i
tral in eastern South Dakota, 29.46
inches at Huron, S. D.. and has re
sulted in a marked rise in tem
perature in the upper Mississippi
and Missouri Valiev, the Central
Plains States, and in the central
Rocky Mountain region This be
ing followed by a “high” in the
Northwest accompanied bv a fall to
normal temperatures. Durin» the
last 24 hours showers have occurred
in east-central Texas. northern
Louisiana, the New England coast,
and in the Northwest. A moderate
ly heavy shower, 1.14 nches, was
reported from Tampa. Fla.
WEATHER BULLETIN
First figure lowest temperature
last night: second. h'ghest tempera
ture yesterday: third, wind velocity
at 8 a. m.; fourth, rainfall past 24
hours.
Abilene . 66 90 n q
Amarillo . 60 S3 — .00
Atlanta . 88 82 _ .00
Austin .. 66 90 _ !l4
Boston . 50 72 _ 04
BROWNSVILLE . 75 90 — .‘on
Chicago . 52 72 14 .00
Corpus Christi .. 78 86 — .00
Dallas . 66 90 _ ioo
Del Rio . 72 88 — !o0
Denver . 58 84 — .00
Detroit . 48 70 — .00
Dodge City 68 90 — .no
E! Paso .... 62 93 — .00
Fort Smith . 69 92 — .00
Galveston . 78 84 — .00
Helena . 40 78 — .01
Huron . 60 88 10 .00
Jacksonville .... 68 go — .00
Kansas City .... 68 88 10 .00
Louisville ....... 54 82 — .00 j
, Memphis . 72 86 — .00
; Miami . 74 86 — .00
‘ Montgomery .... 66 86 — .00
New Orleans ... 74 86 — .00
f New York . 52 72 24 .00
’ North Platte ... 60 88 — .00
Oklahoma City .. 68 94 10 .00
Palestine . 64 90 — .12
Pensacola . 72 82 — .00
Phoenix . 64 96 — .00
) Pittsburgh . 48 76 — .00
ij St. Louis .. 62 $6 12 .00
St. Paul . 62 J2 16 jOO
Salt Lake City .. 62 82 — «0
San Antonio .... 72 88 — .00
' Santa Fe . 52 76 — .00
Sheridan . 50 82 12 .00
Shreveport . 66 92 — .04
Tampa . 70 88 — 1.14
Vicksburg . 68 90 — .00
Washington 54 84 — .00
Wiltiston . 74 13
15 llraingtun .... 64 S2 — .00
PAPAL LEGATE AT CATHOLIC MEET
One of the first pictures to arri\*e in America of tne Eucharistic
congress at Sydney, Australia, shows Cardinal Cerretti, papal legate,
as he attended the sessions. The cardinal is shown in the center of the
group above. The congress of 1927 was held at Chicago, III.
CARDS TO GET
$112626.25
To Slice Melon Into
Servings of $4,
197.25 Each
BY CHARLES W. Dl’NELEY
Associated Press Sports Writer
ST. LOUIS. Oct. 10.—(A*)—The St.
Louis Cardinals found solace today
in the fact that they will split $117,
526.25, a record total for losing play
ers in the world series. They divide
their share into 28 parcels. Twenty
six of the players will receive full
shares with four dividing the re
maining two.
Ernest Orsatti and Earl Smith re
ceived a half-share apiece while
Clarence Lloyd, the secretary of the
club and Harrison Weaver, the train
er, get a half share each. Their slice
of the melon amounted to $2,098.68.
The following members of the club
received $4,197.26 as their full
share: William McKechnie, the
manager; Jack Onslow, the coach and
these players: Alexander, Haines,
Sherdel, Mitchell, Rhem, Reinhart,
Johnson. Frankhouse, Haid, Little
john. Wilson, Bottomley, Frisch, Ma
ranville, High, Thevenow, Hafey
Douthit, Holm, Harper, Blades, Mar
tin. Roettger and Williamson.
The Cards also voted to give $150
each to the two clubhouse boys, Ken
neth and Roy Sullivan and to tjie bat
boy. Butch Y'atkeman.
Sam Breadon, owner of the Cwd
inals, took time out today, to deny
rumors of the sale or of the transfer
of the franchise of the club. Previ
ous to the series, reports were that
he had agreed to sell the club for
$2,000,000.
Texas Ranges In
Good Condition,
U. S. Report Says
AUSTIN, Texas, Oct. 10.—(fp—
The condition of Texas livestock
ranges on October 1 was 89 per cent
compared with 86 a month ago and
also 86 per cent, the average for the
last five years, says the United
States department of agriculture, di
vision of livestock estimates, in a
statement today.
Although ranges deteriorated
somewhat in the northeast, north
west and west-center, they have
shown improvement in other dis
tricts, the statement continues.
In the west ranges are in better
condition than for many years, be
ing recorded at 105 per cent. Grass
and weeds have greened up again in
many areas, and if favored by a lata
frost date, mill assure excellent win
ter range.
“Abundant rains in the south re
vived ranges in that district and
with the exception of a tew scat
tered sections, there will be ade
quate feed for local needs.
"Hay and other feed crops have
made about average yields in those
areas where rain has been adequate,
and only a comparatively fern' sec
tions will find it necessary to im
port feed.**
Have You
Constant
Backache ?
A Persistent Backache Often
Warns of Sluggish Kidneys.
EVERY day find you tired end
achy? Suffer nagging, backache,
drowsy headaches and dizzy spells?
Are kidney secretions too frequent,
scanty or burning?
This often indicates sluggish kid
neys and shouldn’t be neglected. Use
Doan’s Pills. Doan’s, a stimulant
diuretic, increase the activity of the
kidneys and thus aid them in carrying
off waste impurities. Endorsed by
users everywhere.
50,000Users Endorse Doan's:
Mr*. L. Do Anda, 2824 Darwin Av*.,
Los An*ales. Cal..«»»: "Mr kidneys didn’t
set right and my back was awfully lame and
weak. I felt tired, had dizzy spalla and
differed severely from pains in my bark
that kept me from dome much around the
house. One box of Doan's Pills rid mt of
the trouble and I haven t been bothered
since.”
DOANS PKS
A STIMULANT DIURETIC KIDNEYS
fbaier-MilbarnCo Mfg CHesn. Buffalo.NY.
CURTIS URGES
PARTY1 VOTES
-11. ■■■. -.—
Support Being Given
State Candidates
By Senator
ST. PAUL, Minn., Oct. 10.—CP)—
Senator Charles Curtis, republican
vice presidential nominee, is hewing
to his long-standing slogan of “the
straight republican ticket" as he cam
paigns through the interstate polit
ical zones of the northwest where
factional strife in state politics looms
as a threatening influence on the
nstional contest.
Yesterday at Superior. Wis.. he en
dorsed Senator Robert M. LaFollette,
republican senatorial nominee, and
last night in Duluth gave his word
for Arthur E. Nelson, regular repub
lican candidate for the senate in this
state.
LaFollette so far has said nothing
about the Hoovcr-Curtis ticket. His
faction in Wisconsin has opposed
Walter Kohler, of the conservative
wing, republican gubernatorial uom
inee. who is supporting Herbert
Hoober. Curtis also spoke a good
word for Mr. Kohler.
Senator Shipstead. farmer-labor, is
the opponent of Mr. Nelson, regular
republican in Minnesota.
Arrest Man and
Take Liquor and
Horse in Catch
One man was arrested and a horse
and 24 pint botles of mescal were
confiscated by United States cus
toms officials and deputy sheriffs
early Wednesday morning.
The man was arrested on suspicion
when officers saw him walking
through vacant property directly
north of the old city cemetery.
After arresting the man, they start
ed search for the liquor cache which
they believed to be near and finally
found the liquor in a sack at the side
of a mesquite tree to which a horse
had been tied.
The man was ’Jaced in jail and
the liquor and h /f are being held.
Customs Inspector! R. L. Camp
bell and Deputy Sheriffs E. and G.
Cavazos made the haul.
" 1
We Are Sincere 31
in our efforts to give to those 8
who may call upon the Darling B
organization a service that is [j
fitting in every way. We men- m
tally try to reverse our posi- 31
tions and give to those we 3
serve the interested, human £1
service that we would appre- yj
ciate at such a time. n
In our service we have en- 3
deavored to combine thought- jnA
fulness, scope and vision. As BfV
nearly golden rule as is hu- Bn '
msnly pos-ible; that is our Ei
policy. Bjj
WA.DARLING i
FUNERAL HOME
JEFFERSON AT I5TH |
Distinctive Juneral Srniice^r^
jj Every Hour
jj In the Year —
«> ;>
A Black Diamond Bus arrives in ev- !’
ery Valley city, from early morning
until late at night. Always ready to
!; ffive you prompt, dependable service. lj
I' j*
HOURLY SERVICE
It Pays to Ride the Black Diamond Buses
jj - jj
“The Valley’s First Bus Line”
Black Diamond Transportation jj
Company
r
RUSH RESCUE
FROM DEBRIS
OF BUILDING
Piteous App Is of
Victims Spur Work
On Collapsed Struc
ture at Prague
PRAGUE. Czechoslovakia. Oct. 10.
—UP)—Piteous appeals for help com
ing today from the debris of an
eight-story stone office building
which collapsed yesterday spurred
rescue workers on to dig out 15 per
sons estimated to be buried in the
ruins. Eighteen bodies had been re
covered and it was feared many of
those entombed were dead. Two
score were missing.
Pedestrians in the narrow street
and passengers in a street car pass
ing the building at the time of the
collapse were injured. The chief
inspector of police was run over and
killed by a fire department auto
mobile when he was (lurrying to the
scene with a group of salvagers. The
architect of the building was report
ed to have committed suicide on the
spot when he saw the disaster. Three
building inspectors were among
those buried in the ruins.
Cries of relatives of the missing
added to the horror of the scene as
rescue workers labored through the
night under the beams of search
lights.
A woman found in the ruins the
severed head of her husband and po
lice had to take it away from her by
force.
The populace of the vicinity was
terrified by the collapse, which oc
currel at a time when the business
street was thronged.
Government authorities attributed
the collapse to defective cement and
hasty and faulty construction.
Gloria Swanson Has
A Ne\ ' Step-Father
CHICAGO, Oct. 10.—(/Pj—Gloria
Swanson has a new stepfather—C. C.
Woodruff, a member of the Chicago
Civic Opera company orchestra.
Woodruff and Mrs. Adeline Lou
Burns, mother of the screen star,
were married recently at Tiajuana.
but their marriage became known
here only when they established
themselves in a home on Delaware
Place.
It was Mrs. Burns’ third marriage.
Her first husband, Joseph T. Swan
son, father of Gloria, was a sea cap
tain. Her ^second was Mathew P.
Burns, a wealthy California shoe
merchant, who died, leaving her his
estate.
Neither the screen actress nor her
husband, the Marquis de la Falaire
et de la Coudrey, was present at the
ceremony.
MEDIA, Pa.—A jury of seven mer.
and five women here was immune to
nulchritude. Judge McDade charged
in the case of Mrs. Vivian McDow
i ell Page, the Mis3 Mobile of an At
lantic City pageant: “Because God
has endowed this girl with beauty,
i be exceptionally careful not to let
' this fact sway your verdict.” She
was convicted of larceny.
I
OimmentaiiSkin Soao
Today’s Radio Features
Wednesday. Oct. 10
(Central Standard Time] _
1:00—The Smiths; Trade and Mark—WJZ KDKA WJR WLW KYW
KWK WREN
1:10—Palmolive Hour; Lively Program—WEAF WJAX WSM WMC WSB
WRC WSAI wav WON WDAF KSD KVOO WOC WFAA WTAM
WHO KPRC WWJ WOW WOAI KOA WTMJ WCCO WHAS
1:10—l>ong, Lon* Ago: Classical—WOR WADC WaIU WKRC WOHP
WMAQ WO WO KMOX KMBC WSPD WHK KOIL
l.ao— United Military Band-WOR WADC WKRC WOHP WMAQ
WOWO KMOX KMBC WSPD WHK
▼ALLEY RADIO
KW'WC— Valley Radio Station
Brownavill*
(1080 kc—277.8 meters)
9:30-12 noon—Varied musical program.
1:00-4:00—Associated Press dispatches and Valley news ?rom The
Brownsville Herald. Stat ion’s request program inter
spersed.
6:00-7:00—Musical program.
7:00-8:00—Clasasicnl and operatic program.
12 m.—Featured Wednesday midnight program.
_ _ .. .
CIVILWARIN
CHINA FEARED
Kansu Province Con
flict Continuing;
200,000 Dead
SHANGHAI. Oct. 10.—<&)— Civil
warfare after a Mohammedan upris
ing in Kansu Province, which was
stated to have claimed more than
200.000 lives, was believed to be con
tinuing in the western Chinese pro
vince.
In addition to the ravages of civil
warfare the area was stated in ad
vices from missions to be suffering
from an intense famine. This had
been aggravated by the fi-hting a*id
the advices said that half the pop
ulation of the provjnce was liable
to die during the coming winter.
(The Inst estimate of the popula
tion of Kansu, compiled by the Chin
ese nost office in 1923, is 5.927,997).
Serious conflicts between the Kan
su Mohammedans and troops of Gen
eral Fen- Yu-H'innc. who claims tho
overlordshin of the province, caused
chaotic conditions. Detailed infor
mation was not available in Shan
hai. but a letter from the China in
land mission headquarters at Lan
chowfu. capital of Kansu, dated Aug
ust 1 stated that acute troubles
started last spring. At that time
armed Mohammedan bands began
raiding villages throughout central
Kansu, robbing and slaying the in
habitants who were unable to offer
effective resistance.
This situation caused General
Ferg to dispatch an army corps from
Honan province to Kansu in an at
tempt to subjugate the Mohamme
dans. These forces, however, were
defeated and more soldiers were
then poured into Kansu. This re
sulted in civil warfare which was
believed to be continuing although
there have been no reports later
than August.
Engineer Killed As
Wabash Trains Crash
NIAGARA FALLS, Ont., Oct. 10.— I
(&)—John McGregor, engineer, was
killed and several passengers injured
today in a collision between a Wa
bash railroad passenger train and a
freight near Stevensville.
The freight train was on a siding
but it is understood that the rear
end did not clear the main line and
the passenger train ploughed
through.
Her Color Went Black. She
Was Frightened To Death
Mrs. Waite. New Brighton, writes:
"That deadly indigestion and gastritis,
caused by constipation made my color
go black. I was frightened to death,
end I feel your laxative saved my life.
I take them every night now for pre
caution, and do not fear an attack of
constipation poisoning any more.”
CARTER S LITTLE LIVE.R PILLS
Ail druggists—25c and 73c red pkgs.
Doctor at 83 Found People
Preferred His Prescription
The basis of treating sickness hss
not changed since Dr. Caldwell left
Medical College in 1875, nor since he
placed on the market the laxative
prescription he had used in his prac
tice, known to druggists and the
public since 1892, as Dr. Caldwell’s
Syrup Pepsin.
Then, the treatment of constipa
tion, biliousness, headaches, mental
depression, indigestion, sour stom
acn and other indispositions that
result from constipation was en
tirely by means of simple vegetable
laxatives, herbs and roots. These are
still the basis of Dr. Caldwell’s
Syrup Pepsin, which is a combina
tion of senna and other mild laxa
tive herbs, with pepsin.
Dr. Caldwell did not approve of
drastic physics and purges. He did
not believe they were good for hu
man beings to put into their system.
If grown people want to use them
no one can deny them the privilege,
but they should never be given to
children.
The simpler the remedy for consti
pation, the safer for the child and
for vou, and the better for the
general health of all. And as you
can get results in a mild and safe
wsv bv using Dr. Caldwell’s Syrup
Pepsin, why take chsncea with
strong drugs? All drug stores have
the generous bottles.
Manv is the family todar that
makes it a rule always to have a
bottle of this perfect preparation in
the house. Keep it handy and ob
serve these three simple rules of
health: keep the head cool, the feet
warm, and the bowels open. We
fd.
AT AGE 03
""■-■'■■U. 1 1 »-■ 1 \
would be plad to have you prove at
our expense how murn Dr. Cald
well’s Syrup Pepsin ran mean to
you—see special offer in coupon:
i Mail to “SYRUP PEPSIN” Iff)!
1 Montice lo, Illinois. ® I
Please send bottle of I)r. Caldwell's j
Syrup Pepsin to try, entirely FREE. |
I Xante i
__ i
#######»»»»»»»»##
{ Dependable Prompt !
I BROWNSVILLE TITLE COMPANY
> Brownsville
Complete abstracts of title to lands in Cameron
| County. Texas !’
GEORGE B. SIMPSON COMPANY
Certified Public Accountants
Brownsville San Antonio Washington
(Successors to: Simpson, Chenault, Carnciro
& Company)
r '
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proclaims the correct colors
for home decoration
The world today teems with beautiful color.
Gone arc the drab, subdued effects of yester
day. King Color rules in all his glory. The
bewitching hues of the rainbow are in evidence
everywhere—notably in home decoration in
side and out.
But there is a vast difference between colors
that are correct—authentic—and those that are
not You want your home to sparkle. You
appreciate the compliments of your neighbors
on its beauty and your artistic judgment So,
you must Knou; Your Colors.
The House of Acme Quality—“HOME OF
COLOR”—has made it easy for you to select
colors that are not only beautiful, but also cor
rect and, above all, durable. You can’t afford
to experiment with tones, tints, shades of un
known quality’. You must be correct, both for
the sake of artistry and economy.
For forty years the Color Division of Acme
Quality has been creating and developing colors
of correct shade and great durability’. For ex
ample, there is a vast difference between a genu
ine Acme Quality Jade Green and a “near”
jade green—all the difference in the world—
and so on through all the myriad gradation*
of the Acme Quality line.
As “THE HOUSE OF COLOR" in this com
munity we are proud to carry the Acme
Quality line. Whether for the outside or inside
of your home there’s a correct, authentic, dur
able shade for every purpose. And, remember,
only quality paint can be authentic in color.
A Book for You
Ask us to show you the new book, “King
Color Rules the Home,” by Dr. C. D. Holley
and Associates of the Acme Quality Color
Division, and Nancy McClelland, national au
thority on interior decoration. It is a real book
—a valuable treatise on this important subject.
It features 12 American homes, and shows in
beautiful colors the correct decorative schemes
for both inside and out. Such a book usually
costs dollars. You may have a copy for 35c,
less than printing cost.
Consult “THE HOUSE OF COLOR” for the
solution of your color problems. We will be
glad to help.
Eagle Pass Lumber Co.
Brownsville, Texas
-THE HOUSE OF COLOR”
ACME QUALITY
Paint-Varnish -Lacquer
>
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