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Brownsville herald. [volume] (Brownsville, Tex.) 1910-current, January 20, 1930, Image 4

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% SnmmsulUf HeralD
„Established July 4, 1892
Entered as second-class matter in tht Postoffice
Brownsville. Texas.
THE BROWNSVILLE HERALD PUBLISHING
COMPANY
Subscription Rates—Dally and Snnday (7 Issues)
One Year . $9.00
Six Months .$4.50
Three Months.$2.25
One Month. .73
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Prer. is exclusively entitled to the use |
for publication of all news dispatches credited to it or
not otherwise credited in this paper, and also the
local news published herein.

Harlingen Office, Reese-Wil-Mond Hotel. Phone 1020.
TEXAS DAILY PRESS LEAGUE
National Advertising Representatives
Dallas, Texas. 512 Mercantile Bank Building.
Kansas City. Mo.. 306 Coca Cola Building.
Chicago. 111., Association Building.
New York, 350 Madison Avenue.
St. Louis, 502 Star Building.
Loe Angeles, Cal., Room 1015 New Orpheum Bldg.,
846 & Broadway.
San Francisco, Cal.. 318 Kohl Building.
A Definition of Casual Violations
A republican president, a republican secretary of
the treasury and a republican attorney general united
in an imjiortant charge proposed in the laws relat
ing to federal pro enforcement This is the recom
mendation :
“Enlargement of the powers of United States
commissioners so they may try 'casual and slight
offender*’ against the prohibition laws.
They had their definition ready. They asked the
federal lawmakers to fix the penalty for casual and
slight violations at a fine of not more than $500 and
imprisonment of not more tlian six months in jail, or
both, with authority for district attorneys to try ac
cused In such cases by complaint or information—
and not by indictment."
If the casual violations recommendation is en
acted it would give federal commissioners the right
to try small offenders—and it would take away the
constitutional right of trial by jury- This is what
the recommendation made by Pres. Hoover with he
endorsement of Sec. MeUin and Atty, Gen. Mitchell
asks the congress to write into the prohibition stat
utes of the republic: “To fix the penalty at a fine
of not more than $500 and imprisonment of not more
♦han six months in jail.' or both. ’
Under the FI*1*1 Amendment no one shall be held
to answer for a capital or other “infamous crime. ’
unless on a presentment or Indictment of a grand
Jury. __
As construed by the supreme court or tne tinned
States. "Infamous crime” means one punishable by
imprisonment in a penitentiary or for more than one
year, or for any period, if at hard labor
Hence, according to the Wicker.sham commission,
"where imprisonment Is to be in jail, is not to ex
ceed six months and is .not to be at hatd labor, the
crime is not infamous It is only where there is a
possibility of imprisonment in the ptn.'f ntiary. or
for more than a year, or at hard labor tha an in
dictment is requued.”
In Texas all persons convicted under the pro
visions of tire Dean law are guilty of ' infamous
rritrtes” If arraigned in a federal court md found
guilty as charged and given a fine or jail sentence,
they are wholly innocent of the perpetration of an
infamous crime.
This is a funny old world and the legal distinctions
are as queer as the lawmakers responsible for them
There would be a uniformity of laws to say the
least. There is no fine or jail sentence to be found
in the Dean act. There is no suspended sentence
above a certain age for the casual violator.
He goes over the road to the penitentiary for one
to five years. This is the reason why the country
bovs go to the penitentiary and the city boys are
given fines or jail sentences. If it isn’t a mockerv of
Justice then name it and take it.
Organizing Co-operative Forces
Having launched programs for the organization of
w heat farmers and cotton growers and sheep and mo
hair producers, the federal farm board had broken
around for two additional national commodity mar
keting associations one for fruits and one for vege
tables
Texas is interested. Texans are interested
Texas is getting to be the greatest citrus producing
state and as for vegetable growing it is going to
lead all American states In coming years. First of
all organisation of the producers or growers in thc
varioua fields of wealth making endeavor is necessary.
Without thorough organization the co-operative
idea will be a failure, the governmental marketing sys
tem will be a failure and the plans of the federal
farm relief board will be shattered to fragments on
the rocks. ORGANIZATION COMES'FIRST.
OUR OWN MIDDLED WHO'S WHO
^ Copyright, 1930, by The Associated Newspapers.)
("The British Who's Who' for 1930 lists Colonel
Llndbcrg as lauried to Elizabeth, daughter of Dwight
Davis. Among the other amusing errors are the re
cording of Alfred E. Smith as present governor of
New York ”—News item.
GEORGE. David Lloyd.—Born Naples. May 5.
1903; son of Mussolini and tlic Seven Sutherland
Sisters; married at Lincoln, Nebraska, July 4, 1920,
to Mle. Lietzel, daughter of Senator Heflin and the
only woman to make 235 revolutions suspended in
midair by her left wrist; author of “Kiss Me Again,”
“In the Baggage Coach Ahead,” "Hello Central Give
Me Heaven" and “Boop-oop-a doop"! residence,
Pennsylvania Station <L. X. side* New York
• • • •
LILLIE. Beatrice.—Born Moscow. June 4 1900;
educated Harvard college; married Oct. 21, 1918, to
Rev. S. Parkes Cadman of Brooklyn, N. Y.; first wo
man to swim the English channel playing a violin;
largest breeder of thoroughbred artichokes in the
United Kingdom: hobbies: orchid culture under
glass, charades, card tricks and kelly pool.
• • • •
KIPLING. Rudyard:—Born West Philadelphia. Pa..
June 6. 1876; educated Harvard. Oxford and Penn
Dental: married Oct. 5. 1898, to Minnie, daughter of
Lord Roberts, founder of the White Star Line; first
Englishman to go over Niagra Falls in a barrel; made
first appearance in Niblo's Gardens, N. Y., as pan
tomime actor; later became best known Scotch co
median in the world; composes own songs; author of
"I Love a Lassie”, "Roamin' In the G lac min’ ”, etc.;
recreations: golf, salmon fishing and hitch-hiking;
Address. Dunoon.
• • • •
LODGE. Sir Oliver Joseph —Professional golfer;
son of Masonic and Elks Lodge, bom Dublin. Jan. C,
188*: married Nov. 27. 1910. to Gertrude Lawrence,
younger daughter of Lawrence of India; began life
as trick roller-skater; inventor of pneumatic bicycle
tire, electric cigar-lighter and non-snapping banjo
string; wrote all of Harry Tate's music hall skits
1899 to 1910; nw skipper of the Berengaria: recrea
tions: playing musical saw and trving to eatch
thumbs: address; Buckingham Palace and ask for
Gus.
GALSWORTHY. John —Famous *ea merchant and
yachtsman; owner of Shamrock T. to 17; owns rich
rubber and tea estates Ceylon: born in Glasgow May
10. 1850. the son of Admiral Je!li,'oe and Mrs. Fisk;
began life with a pound of tea a*"d became foremost
tea mogul and challenger for America s cup: will race
American defender again this veer off Newport; re
creations: dice and kelly pool; residence: Sandy
Hook
• • • •
TOLLEY Cyril. Edward. Allvrt. Christian. George.
Patrick. David: Prince of W^.les; born Mar 8 1891;
fell off first horse Jan. 7. 190?. educated Oxford. Dub
lin. Princeton. Dartmouth and Columbia Law School:
noted lion and elephant hunter; member house com
mittee Brooklyn Lodge of Elks; recreations: mush
room raising at home; residence: Hempstead Heath.
CERTAINLY
The Turtle Islands must be the place from which
those golfers who take three minutes over every putt
come.
i _
Mr. Edward F. Harkness. the Santa Claus of Yale,
has just given about $12.000.000 more to the univer
sity for the building nf a quadrangle system of dor
mitories. Wonder what a Yale president thinks about
when he gets up in the morning and finds no letter
from a member of the Harknrss family giving the
college a few new buildings or something?
• '
FOR THE SWOONING TYPE
"In the Gift Shop. 25 collapsible English Ladies*
Hit Eoxes."—Department store advertisement,
J A. McMahon writes in to ask if there is any truth
in the rumor that members of the Woolworth family
always get the automobile license number 5N-10?
THE OLD HOME TOWN.Stanley
I — »- - -
READ THIS FIRST:
After the signing of the armistice
Lieutenant Rex Dallard. Dr. Frank
Gordon, Nurse Margery Lynne and
Patricia Blair sail for New York,
bent on thwarting the plans of Her
bert Maxwell, guardian of Patricia
and her twin brother, who seeks to
do them out of their fortune. Max
well has taken Jimmy to New York
with him. the boy suffering from
aphasia due to shell shock. Another
man. posing a^ Jimmy, is to be used
by Maxwell in obtaining half the
Blair fortune. Nurse Margery Lynne
after seeing Jimmy no a New York
street, is slugged, coming to later
in a hospital. The friends prepare
Patricia for her ordeal when she
must face the fake brother and deny
him in order to keep Jimmy's half
of the fortune until he is discover
ed.
(NOW GO ON WITH THEjSTORY)
CHAPTER 22
The brown eyes looking into Mar
gery's smiled through a mist of
tears that veiled them. Then, all at
once, an odd expression began to
glimmer in heir humid depths. The
pretty mouth straightened. Pat sat
up.
"I just thought of something,”
announced, with vast solemnity,
glancing around as if bidding every -
one to pay close attention. "Rex said
I must prove this sub isn't my
brother—that to do so I must first
produce the real Jimmy Blair. Well,
just listen, please:
"When I was fifteen I was stricken
with appendicitis and was operated
upon. At tiie time it was discovered
that my heart was on the right side
—that I was dextra hearted—that
is. my heart wasn't on the left side,
where hearts usually are located
Six months afterwards Jimmy had
his appendix removed and strangely
enough, the doctors discovered his
heart lo be on the right side too—:
that is. the same as mine, not on the
left side. The two cases were con
sidered quite remarkable at the
time, we being twins. The doctor
who oj> rated on us both was our
family physician. Dr. Gardner.
"Now. supposing that Dr. Card-1
ner were to come here, examine this
Rub of Maxwell's—that is. subject
him to an X-ray e?;aminaion—and
find that he still possesses his.ap-!
pendtx and that his heart Is not on
the right ride, but on the left, where
the normal person's heart is located?
Wouldn't that prove he wasn't James
K. Elair?”
She urned to Dr. Gordon.
"You ought to be able to answer
that question. Doctor Frank " she
i dded. smiling at him. "Wouldn't it
prove my case ior me?"
“I’ll say it would. Pat,” replied the
young doctor, with a warmth of en
thusiasm unusual to him. and the
look he gave her held a new ad

I <
-IXJ
Who am I? Where is my home?
Whom did I recently marry?
What is the real name of r.amon
Novarro?
What president was the first to
be buried from the White House?
‘For the Father Judgeth no man.
but hath committed all judgment
unto the Son. • Where is this pas
sage found in the Bible?
Correctly Speaking—
Of course we never say. "There
isn't no such thing." Remember
that two negatives make a positive.
Today's Anniversary
On this dufe, in 1919, 27 nations
were participating in the peace con
ference at Versailles.
Today's Horoscope
Persons born on this dav are
clear headed and ready for any
emergency. They do not betray
confidences.
Answers to Foregoi g Questions
1. Julios Rosen wald; Chicago;
Mrs. Adele Goodkind.
2. Ramon Gil Samoniegos.
3. William Henry Harrison.
4. St. John. v. 22.
Star Lore
SEMOND ASTRONO ICAL PRE
DICTION OF EINSTEIN
By Arthur DeV. Carpet ter
Emstcin predicted t ? curving
of light rays passing near the sun.
His formula, for the path of light
grazing the sun. set forth that
such ray would movs in an orbital
path the same as a planet does,
with a difference involving the
square ratio of the velocity of a
moving body to the velocity of
light. In ther .ds, if a PLAN IT
moved with a velocity equal to that
of light, its orbital path would be
that of light. The satisfactory test
of predicted curvature of light ve
locity grazing the sun was made at
total eclipses c ** * sun in 1919
and in 19 2.
<Mor? Tomorrows
miration. “I don t think there would
be any question about it. Those two
operation s, your brother’s and yours
are on record doubtless, in the hes
pial where they were performed
and a copy of them could be ob
tained and brought here by your
family doctor. He would come
wouldn’t he, If you asked him?”
* I'm sure he would!” answered the
girl, the light of a new determina
tion shmiug In her brown eyes. She
turned to the lieutenant. He, too.
was smiling his admiration of her in
genuous idea.
“What do you think. Rex?” she
asked. “And you. Marge?” she add
ed, smiling at the two in turn.
“I think the same as Prank!” re
plied the lieutenant, with quick
diplomacy.
“So do I!" chimed in Margery, a
loyal enthusiasm in voice and man
ner. “How did you come to think of
such a clever thing, dear?”
“Oh. I—” She hesitated flushing
at the very apparent tribute that she
knew was absolutely honest. “It
really wasn't clever you know. The
thought Just came to me. that's all!”
“Of course," said Dallard reflect
ively, “we've got to wait until we
know Just what Maxwell's game
really is before we can do anything
toward checkmating him. Tomor
row ought to give us a pretty fan
line on the situation. Ill see the
lawyer the first thing in the morn
ing. Pat. and put your idea up to
him. And I think y»u'd better wire
this family doctor of yours—send
him a night message and lind out
for sure if he'll come to New York
at once. Instruct him to get a rec
ord of the two operations and bring
them with him. If Maxwell pulls the
stunt were looking Itr tominonow
then our lawyer can get a stay ot j
proceedings in the legacy transit • '
until your doctor arrives."
He considered the group individu
ally. then collectively.
The old year had runs out and the
New Year rung in when the two
men donned their ovei coats in pre -1
paration for departure. Pat bade
them a final “Happy New' Year” at
the foot of the stairs leading up to
her room, but Margery accompanied
th"m as far as the vestibule.
"I just wanted to remark in a
casual way," she told them laugh
ingly, "that the man who is instru
mental in giving Jimmy hack to
Pa: will earn ihe undying gr.-'.tuci
—and love—oi at least two girls—I
won't say who they are’ Aik: you
may play that." she added, in the
vernacular of the race track, n
they pas -cd through the door, "as
it lies—straight across the board!"
Margery had been -in love, us she
‘old Pat one day, "more times than
I've got finger; and toes." But she f
had laughed when she said it. She
knew now. and had known it al
most from the hour that Jimmy was
brought, white and unconscious, in -
to the field hospital at C—. in,
France, that until then, she never
had been in love.
Jimmy's handsome, boyish face
haa captured her romantic fancy tl>
ins'.art her gaze had fallen on it
When he reamed consciousr.es
only to remain dumb. unthUlkn.
ancl the doctor had pronounced hun
a victim of aphasia, a great p;ty had
surged up in her heart tor him. And
pity, as the old saying informs u
"Is ever akin to love."
Then had ccme the story of Jim
my s heroic action to which his in
jury was directly attributable, us
told her by Lieutenant Dallarci. him
self. She had found the boy of her :
adolescent dreams her own hear* '
choice. There remained for her the
task, the work of her heart and
hand.to rescue and bring him back
to life, and—perhaps—love. Perhaps
too. in that process of his mind's
regeneration.
And so. donning her pajamas and
leaving on her stockings, she went
into Pat's room to talk. The young
heiress was engaged In polishing
her blue-black hair with a pair of
military brushes.
"There's no use in trying to evade
the momentous issue, darling. ’ an- j
nounced Margery, without any pre
face, as she placed her young body j
comfortably among a heap of pil
lows in the comer of a huge divan.
"It's as plain as the bridge on the
face of your nose!"
“I know it—I’m helpless." Pat re
turned, "so go ahead—shoot, if you
must, but—spare this poor bobbeo
head!"
"To begin with, my rosebud." be
gan Margery, pursing up her pretty
lips to acquire a serious air, "and in
spite of all the evidence in plain '
sight—when either one or both of
you have In sight—you act always
as if such a possibility had never
Miserable With
Backache ?
Too Often It Warns of
Disordered Kidneys•
A CONSTANT backache, with
kidney irregularities and a at iff.
achy, worn-out feeling all too often
warn of disordered kidneys. Don't
take chances! Help your kidneys
with Doan's Pills. Recommended
the world over. Sold by dealers
everywhere.
50,000 Users Endorse Doan’s:
Mrs. Frances Witt man, <53 Miami
Arc., Kcnaas City, Kansas, says: “My
back hurt so bad that morning* I could
hardly pet outof bed. The sec re‘.on* burned
and broka my teat at night, born e Pills
made me feel as well as ever.'*
- • --
DADDATC niCCACr IC MATUIAir wcu/
O — —J
occurred to you! Do I make myself
perfectly clear?"
"Oh, perfectly, Peggy dear." said
Pat. "but, please tell me—what are
you talking about?"
The young person in sky-blue pa
jamas emitted a dolelul sigh. Then:
"It is about as I feared. My dar
ling. dearest girl friend, all unknow
ingly, and without malice or intent,
in breaking the hearts of two of the
finest men in the world. And I'll j
bet a million dollars-* !f I v' '/’ **
hat the never has given the mut
ter a single mougu.. a..... j
dear?"
Pat turned slowly on her mol- j
ving chair and looked at the girl on'
the divan. There was nothing of dis
pleasure nor of reproof in the look.
It was simply an inquiring look, a
look that asked as plainly as words
might ask: "Arc you actually in
earnest—do you really mean what
you say—or are you just kidding
me?** t
ihe blue eyes into which she
laked filmed suddenly with tears,
the talt. stinging tears of deep con
trition. The pajaina-garbed figure
straightened slightly and leaned ■
forward.
"What—what is it. Pat. dear?" i
tame the hesitant, low-spoken
query, "are you—you angry at what
I—I said?"
A quiCK, musical chuckle rippled
over Pat Blair's rtxi lips, the ex- j
; rssion of a spontaneous mirth
which was one of her most endear-!
ing possessions.
<TO BE CONTINUED
Flashes of Life '
'By The Associated Press)
NEW YORK—The queen of the
links is looking for new worlds fo
conquer. Glenna Collett, golf star,
who has had a trifle of experience
In court tournaments, Is taking les
ons in tennis. Mary K. Browne,
once queen of the courts, will be
eligible to compete for Glennas golf
title this year. She once beat Glen
na in a national golf championship.
TARRYTON. N. Y. — Business
ethics of parents must meet the
standards of Highland Manor
school, a private school for girls,
before their daughters will be ac
cepted as pupils. Dr. Eugene H.
Lehman announced to an assembly
of the 90 students that one girl
IF SORE
I3ROAT SSB,
l e Mu«tero!«—uaually elective
in one application — better whrr
applied once every hour for 5 hour,
_ , j
1 MATAMOROS HOTEL
CATERS TO SMALL °RIVATE
PARTIES
American Management
' A. TAMM
Blue Printing and
Supplies
Harlingen, Texas
DID YOE TRY THOSE
Good Pecan)Vaffle*
—AT—
Anthony’* Waffle Shop
517 Twelfth Street
I
. —— 1 . —
had been refused admittance be
cause her parents were engaged in
Improper business practices. He said
later the couple were wealthy and
of some prominence. He believes
it is the duty ot schools to raise the
business and social ethics of parents.
NEW' YORK—Filmdom is looking
forward to a big week-end party at
the Long Island home of iGlda Gray
in celebration of her marital free
dom and is expecting a revelattion
as to a many-carated diamond It
has noted. A decree of divorce from
Gil Boag. of Port Washington. Wis..
has just become effective insofar as
permission to remarry is concerned.
NEW YORK—There has been
much ado about noise here and a
special municipal commission is
1 studying things. Among the results
so far nave been apologies. A bank
' erecting a skyscraper in Wall
! street wrote neighbors regretting the
unnecessary din. The framework ot
an apartment building in Gram
; ercy Park bears a sign: “Our stn
I cere apologies to our neighbors for
the unavoidable annoyance this
hammering must occasion.
TOrnStop It In 0n« Minute
jJLjLJJ With One Swai low
Wight cough def ft* most
III lln 11 ramodio* but • cinglo wilt
low of M*atodeo« (top* it,
A Spoeit'iM'i prescription.
/, >o “dope." Got Montodeno
'Maul from druggist. Sleep soundly
. ■* tonight without coughing.
1911 1939
Skelton Abstract Co.
Abstracts of Title Title Insurance
Merchants Bank Building .Brownsville
Dependable Phone 353 Prompt
BROWNSVILLE TITLE COMPANY
BROWNSVILLE. TEXAS
Abstracts of Title Title Insurance
We cover all lands lu C amrmn County
CARNEIRO, CHUMNEY & COMPANY
Certified Public Accountants
Income Tax Service
BROWNSVILLE SAN ANTONIO CORPUS CHRISTI
State National Bank Smith-Young Tower Nixon Building
.. . -.—.A, .. .- - - ' " l—n
i|— — ! »
We Do Not Ask~
We Give
STABILITY
INTEGRITY
CHARACTER
j .
to your business
The combined assets of the directors of
this bank are more than 3 million dollars.
\
4 r/0 Compounded semi-annually paid
on Savings Accounts
First National Bank
Established in 1891

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