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Brownsville herald. [volume] (Brownsville, Tex.) 1910-current, September 20, 1933, Image 5

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063730/1933-09-20/ed-1/seq-5/

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BILL A I JOE
TO DO BATTLE
Playing-Managers to Lead
Clubs in World
Series
BY ALAN GOULD
NEW YORK, Sept. 20.—(^P)—For
the first time since 1906, the Amer
ican and National league rivals for
Jgthe “world baseball championship"
^ooth will be directed on the field
by player managers.
There have been a number o!
player pilots since then, of course,
on one side of the battleground or
the other but William Harold Terry
of the Giants and Joseph Cronin
of the Senators will be the first
pair to combine master-minding
and personal exploits in the world
aeries since fielder Jones led the
Chicago White flox to triumph over
Prank Chance’s Cubs.
The Senators expect history to
repeat itself. Cronin carries the
Washington banner into the cham
pionship fray where “Bucky” Har
ris, then the “boy wonuer,’’ left off
as the pilot of the pennant-winning
Benators of 1924-25. They whipped
the world champion Yankees. They
expect to “take” the Giants.
Terry is Boss
Giant rooters have faith in Terry,
as John McGraw’s successor, for
the reason that he has already
achieved the supposingly "impossi
ble” by bringing the club home in
front this year after being picked
to finish no better than sixth.
“Memphis Bill” himself thought at
the outset he would be lucky to
land in the first division and third
place was the best he hoped for.
“But once we got the idea we
could win, why we simply couldn’t
Jose,” laughed Terry when I talked
with him during the Giants’ tri
jumphant final tour of the wfest.
$.“You can say we have won because
we built up the greatest four-man
pitching staff in either league ana
you would be correct. You can say
we got a lot of breaks and that’s
right too. But the big thing to me
is that every man on this club get
out there, day after day, and played
his head off. We forced a lot of
those breaks because we refused to
be licked/’
Terry and Cronin both are great
hitters. Defensively they are the
class of their positions, in either
big league. They have the knack
of setting the pace or producing
the hits that count the most. Oth
erwise they are radically different
personalities.
Griff Aids Cronin
I As ball players go Terry is a
~ veteran, while Oronin is in his
v prime. Bill will be 35 in October
and Joe 27 the same month. Cronin
was born in San Francisco, Terry
in Atlanta. 1
Terry is in absolute charge of
the Giants on the field. He takes
orders from no one when it comes
to tactics, choice of pitchers or
shifts in the lineup. When he re
placed McGraw, he determined to
be the “boss,” so that he could sink
of swim on his own responsibility.
His success has given him clearer
rfpfte to command than ever.
(Jronin, soft-spoken and less
dynamic than his rival, has acquir
ed a thorough linowledge of base
ball and shown he can apply it.
However, the Senators’ field boss
has behind him the advice and
counsel of one of the game's
shrewdest strategists, Clark Grif
fith. The president of the Washing
ton club was a famous manager and
pitcher in his day. He is still the
■ “old fox” and the man behind the
senatorial guns. If there is any
heavy thinking or weighty decisions
to be made “Griff” makes them.
Eagle Schedule
Coach Ben Brite rounded out
the Brownsville high school foot
ball schedule at the Coaches’ &
Officials’ association meeting at
Mercedes Tuesday.
The schedule:
Oct. 6—San Benito at Browns
ville.
Oct. 13—Brownsville at Donna.
Oct. 20—Brownsville at Weslaco.
Oct. 27—Santa Rosa at Browns
ville.
Nov. 8—Brownsville at Raymond
ville.
Nov. 10—Falfurrias here, tentative
Nov. 17—Rio Hondo at Browns
'* ville.
Nov. 24—La Feria at Brownsville.
Thanksgiving — Harlingen at
Brownsville.
Carnivorous animals lap up water
their tongues; herbivorous
aflfrhals, as the horse and ox, suck
it up.
3 CORNERED
Claudette Colbert star of Para
mount’s new comedy hit "Three
Cornered Moon" with Richard
Arlen and Mary Boland showing
Friday and Saturday at the
Capitol Theatre.
\ ; .... • ;
Giants Take Pennant As
Phillies Defeat Pirates
By HUGH 8. FULLERTON, Jr.
william Harold Terry, the
sturdy young man from Memphis
who took over the management of
the New York Giant* a year ago
when John McGraw retired, led
his club back home from the west
COACHES TELL
BEAR STORIES
Grid Association Reflects
Officials in Meat
At Mercedes
(Special to The Herald)
MERCEDES, Sept. 20. — Helen
Morgan, piano and all, would not
have had a chance in the blues
singing competition staged by the
Valley football coaches at their
first meeting of the season here
Tuesday night.
Among the most doleful notes
rendered were those contributed by
Don (No Felt) Johns of Raymond
ville, A1 Weir of McAllen, ‘'Mule”
Brown of San Benito and Dutch
Rektorik of Harlingen.
Johns’ theme song was a throaty
ballad concerning 17 graduations,
three regulars back but all ineligi
ble, best player out with a broken
arm and second best player quit
the squad. “I'm Only Asking for
Sympathy,” was the title of John’s
selection.
The coaches wiped away their
tears long enough to re-elect their
officials—Jack York, president; A1
Weir, vice president; and O. I. Cox,
secretary-treasurer.
Most of the time was devoted to
tall bear stories and filling out of
schedules.
The session was well attended.
The second meeting will be held
next Tuesday at Mercedes.
Beer Distributors
Get Phone Number 32
(Special to Tt ’ Herald)
SAN BENITO. Sept. 20. — The
telephone number three-two has
been obtained by the Alexander
Marketing Co., for the sale of
Schott’s Highland beer, according
to Louis S. Witte, manager.
“And the beer contains every bit
of 3.2 alcohol,” Witte said.
Schott’s is one of the oldest
breweries on the continent, having
been established at Highland, HI.,
in 1853. It was established there
to take advantage of the under
ground caverns for aging purposes
and Highland is the only beer aged
in caves in the United States. All
the old famous beers were aged un
derground, Witte said, giving them
mellowness.
Alexander Marketing Co. has
distribution for Cameron, Hidalgo
and Willccy counties for both keg
and bottled beer.
Valley salesmen have been em
ployed. They are Glen Goolsby
LeRoy Crawford, J. T. Cawley and
Clayton Gunn.
Although the beer did not go on
sale until It was legal, last Friday,
it is enjoying wide popularity.
WEATHER !
East Texas (east of 100th meri
dian) : Generally fair Wednesday
night and Thursday; cooler in
northeast portion Wednesday night;
warmer in northwest portion Thurs
day.
Light to moderate northerly , to
easterly winds on the coast.
The river will remain practically
stationary from about Mercedes
down, and continue to fall slowly
at Hidalgo and probably at Rio
Grande City during the next 24 to
48 hours.
RIVER BULLETIN
Flood Present 24-Hr. 24-Br.
Stage Stage Chan^. Rain
Laredo 27 8.1 +0.3 .00
Rio Grande 21 14.6 -2.9 .00
Hidalgo 22 22.0 -0.5 .00
Mercedes 20 21.7 0.0 .06
Brownsville 18 .06
TIDE TABLE
High and low tide at Port Isabel
Thursday, under normal meteor
ological conditions:
High. 3:56 a .m.; 5:19 p. m.
Low . 10:12 a. m.; 10:55 p. m.
MISCELLANEOUS DATA
Sunset today . 6:29
Sunrise tomorrow. 6:18
BULLETIN
(First figures, lowest temperature
last night; second, highest yester
day; third, wind velocity at 8 a.m.;
fourth, precipitation In last 24 hrsJ
Abilene . 72 98 — 0
Amarillo . 58 84 — 0
Atlanta . 72 90 14 0
Austin . 74 98 10 0
BROWNSVILLE .. 76 89 — .06
Brownsville Airport 76 89 — .05
Chicago . 58 84 16 .14
Cleveland . 60 74 18 .74
Corpus Chrlsti .... 78 -88 — 0
Dallas . 74 96 — 0
Del Rio . 74 96 — 0
Denver . 48 74 — 0
El Paso . 70 90 16 0
Port Smith . 64 94 — 0
Houston . 74 94 — 0
Huron . 42 74 — 0
Jacksonville . 78 94 — o
Kansas City . 60 80 — 0
Los AngeJ*e . 54 80 — 0
Louisville . 64 88 12 U
Memphis . 66 92 — .14
Miami . 80 88 — .08
Minneapolis . 50 72 22 0
New Orleans . 78 92 — 0
North Platte . 48 76 — 0
Oklahoma City .... 56 92 — 0
Palestine . 74 94 — 0
Pensacola . 78 88 — 0
Phoenix . 80 102 — .06
St. Louis . 62 88 12 0
Salt Lake City .... 58 86 14 0
San Antonio . 74 96 12 u
Santa Fe . 48 78 — 0
Sheridan . 32 70 — 0
Shreveport . 74 98 — 0
Tampa . 76 94 — 0
Vicksburg . 74 94 — 0
Washington . 64 84 — .16
Williston . 38 66 — 0
Wilmington . 68 88 — 0
Winnemucca . 40 86 — 0
today with the National league
pennant added to its luggage.
Meanwhile the Washington Ben*
ators, who were believed to have
sewed up the American league
championship while the surprising
Oiants were still regarded as an
uncertain quantity, were marking
time along the penant trail, need
ing two more decisions for them
or against the New York Yankees
to clinch the other place in the
world’s series.
The Giants settled the National
league race yesterday—or rather
had it settled for them when the
Phillies knocked their last rivals,
the Pittsburgh Pirates, out of the
running. Knowing they were “in"
from the second inning on, the
Giants went down to a 12 to 3 de
feat at the hands of the St. Louis
Cardinals. But they could afford
to lose that game and all the nine
others left on their schedule after
the Pirates dropped a 3-2 decision
in the second game of a double
header.
No Chance to Lose
After beating the Phils 2 to 1
behind Larry French’s steady
pitching in the opener for their
82nd victory of the season, the
Buccos took their 65th defeat when
the Phils put on an eighth inning
rally for two rims. They have
seven more to play but if thpy win
them ali the best percentage they
can reach is .578. The Giants, with
88 won and 55 lost so far, can drop
nine more and still have a .579
mark.
The American league race tight
ened up meanwhile as the Sen
ators, with a chance to clinch the
pennant right in front of them,
lost their second straight game to
the St- Louis Browns. 4 to 0, when
Dick Coffman allowed the league
leaders oniv six hits. The New
York Yankees did their part toward
staying in the race by overwhelm
ing the Chicago White Sox, 10-1
and 10-3. They combined 17-hit
attacks in each game with air
tight pitching by George Uhle and
Charley Devens.
This reduced the Senators’ lead
from nine to 7 1-2 games but didn’t
make any serious difference in the
pennant race as two victories in
their remaining eight games still
will win the flag for Washington
even if the Yanks take all of the
nine they have left.
Big Welcome
The Giants, who couldn’t even
draw a big crowd on their own
home grounds early In the season,
had a big welcoming party ahead
of them at the end of their home
ward journey as champions with
a parade through town to the city
hall for an official greeting as the
climax tomorrow morning. It was
all the warmer, perhaps, because
the team which won the 13th pen
nant for a New York National
league club, thus equalling the
major league record made by the
Chicago Cubs last year, was one
which fooled the experts and the
fans alike in taking the title.
Outside of the games which had
a direct bearing on the pennant
faces, there was little of import
ance in yesterday’s major league
program. Jimmie Fcxx took a
place in the spotlight as he wal
loned his 46th home run of the
season to help the Philadelphia
Athletics beat Detroit 5 to 2. Bill
Weber of Boston also did some
serious clouting, contributing two
doubles and a triple to the Red
Sox's 4-3 triumph over the Cleve
land Indians.
Another Bostonian, Ed Brandt
of the Braves, turned in a four
hit flinging performance to give
his club a 3-0 victory over the
Cincinnati Reds. The Brooklyn
Dodgers had a field day at bat
with three Chicago aces, Lon War
neke, Bud Tinnim; and Charley
Root as their victims, and shel
lacked the Cubs 12 to 3.
Students Elect
(Special to The Herald)
MERCEDES, Sept. 20— At the
annual student election in the
Mercedes high school, Ferguson
Hager was elected president of
the senior class. Other senior of
ficers named were Stewart Lentz,
vice president; Miss Anne Fergu
son, secretary, and Miss Verna
Rose Gauch, treasurer.
Officers of the junior class are:
Miss Jacqueline Johnson, president;
Jack Brown, vice president; Miss
Doris Griffin, secretary and treas
urer, and Orin Johnson, parlia
mentarian.
Miss Virginia Henry has been
named president of the sophomore
class, Miss Harriet Kidder, vice
president, and Miss Betty Cham
bers secretary and treasurer.
Fruit Preserver Tested
RIO DE JANEIRO (jF)—Citrus
fruit exporters near here are experi
menting with a preservation liquid
which its Spanish inventor, Ortiz
Cabezas, claims will maintain fruit
in good condition several weeks
without refrigeration.
LAST TIMES
Richard Arlen and Mary Brian
in “Song of the Eagle” showing
for the last time Wednesday si
the Queen Theatre.
DIXIE SERIES
OPENS INS.A.
Hurling to Decide Issue
Between Padres
And Pels
•AN ANTONIO, Tex., Sept. 20.
(/T)—The San Antonio Missions, Tex
as league baseball champions for
the first time since 1908, will enter
the Dixie Series here tonight
against New Orleans, Southern as
sociation champions.
The Pels just won a playoff with
Memphis and the Missions sur
vived s Texas league playoff with
four clubs Involved.
The Missions played to 7,900
paid admissions in the final game
here that brought the title. More
than 2,000 seats have been placed
in right field for this series, in
creasing the capacity to 10,000. The
seats were erected by tearing down
the right field fence and appro
priating part of the street behind
right field.
The series apparently will sim
mer down to pitching. Both clubs
are known as “money” clubs, and
both are the "big inning” type on
offensive playB. Either will make
runs, and the question of winning
will stand squarely on the shoulders
of pitchers.
San Antonio was expected to
start Fabian Kowaiik, ace right
hander who won 24 games this
year. Kowaiik won 15 of his last
17 starts, and won three straight
in the Texas league playoffs. But
five runs were .scored off him in
three games. The Missions will
follow with Wiltse and Miller here,
and probably come back with
Kowaiik again on Sunday in New
Orleans. Walkup, White and Con
lan were ready for relief duty.
New Orleans was expected to
start Andy Messenger, old time San
Antonio player, tonight in an ef
iort to open the series with a vic
tory.
The Missions were centered on
stopping the hitting of Eddie Mor
gan, right hand swatter who de
lights in hitting outside balls to
right field. The short right field
here was made to order for Mor
gan, who gained fame hitting
home runs over Cleveland’s short
fence In the old park.
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Won. Lost. Pet.
Washington . 95 49 .660
New York . 86 55 .610
Philadelphia ...... 74 67 .525
Oicveland . 74 72 .507
Detroit . 69 78 .469
Chicago . 03 81 .438
Boston . 53 84 .413
St. Louis. 55 89 .362
Tuesday’s Results
New' York 10-10, Chicago 1-3.
Boston 4, Cleveland 3.
Philadelphia 5, Detroit 2.
St. Louis 4, Washington 0.
Wednesday’s Games
Chicago at New York.1
St. Louis at Washington. Jm
Detroit at Philadelphia. m?
Cleveland at Boston.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
New York . 88 55 .015
Pittsburgh . 82 65 .558
Chicago . 82 67 .550
St. Louis . 80 67 .544
Boston . 76 68 .5:78
Brooklyn .. 59 83 .415
Philadelphia . 56 85 .397
Cincinnati . 57 90 .368
Tuesday’s Results
Pittsburgh 2-2, Philadelphia 1-3.
Brooklyn 12, Chicago 3.
Boston 3, Cincinati 0.
St. Louis 12, New York 3.
Wednesday’s Games
Boston at Cincinnati.
Philadelphia at Pittsburgh.
Only twro scheduled.
Final Preparations Are
Set for Thursday Fights
Final arrangements for the debut
of legal boxing here Thursday night
are being completed by Ernie
Stephens, match maker for All
Sports, Inc.
The card, which features a ten
round main event between 3111
Cabler, Brownsville middleweight,
Doty Captures ,
Valley Title
EDINBURG, Sept. 20.—Ivy Lee
Doty, sensational young tennis
player of Pharr and member of
the state championship Edinburg
Junior College tennis team tliis
year, won two titles at the annual
South Texas Tennis Tournament
completed Tuesday on the Edin
burg Junior College Courts.
Doty was paired with 8. W.
Patrick of Edinburg in the doubles
competition and defeated Clair
Hudson of Weslaco, also a member
of the Edinburg Junior College
championship team early this year,
and Kim Harty, McAllen High
School tennis coach. The score in
the playoff match was 8-6, 8-6, 6-0.
Hudson’s partner, Jack Jones of
Weslaco, was unable to participate
and Karty substituted for him.
Doty beat Hudson, the 1932 Val
ley champion, by a score of G-3,
6-1 in the semi-finals, and defeated
Norman Schrager of Edinburg in
the finals to win the title. The
championship match scores were
6-4, 3-6, 6-4, 6-1. Schrager, althougn
participating in the finals for the
first time, played determined and
beady tennis in bowing to the
powerful Doty.
The new doubles champions re
ceived a silver cup each and Doty
was awarded another silver cup as
singles champion. The playoffs
were delayed for two weeks because
of the hurricane.
Eagles Working
For First Game
The Brownsville Eagles may net
be the biggest or smartest squad
in the Valley, but the more Coach
Ben Brite sees of his Fledglings
the better he likes them.
The 32 youngsters, led by five
returning lettermen, are smacking
away in scrimmages in a fashion
which bedes no good for the oppo
sition. The Eagles have a spirit
which should carry them far.
The problem confronting Coach
Brite is to get some seasoning un
der the green sauad’s belt before
the opening contest here Oct. 6
with the San Benito Greyhounds.
The Eagles have already been
given a few plays which they are
running off a single-wingback
formation.
All things considered, the Eagles
should stack up as a sizeable team
in oompansion with other Valley
aggregations. Tire club is expected
to average around 140 pounds to
the player.
Local Labor For
Valley Work Urged
(Special to The Herald)
8AN BENITO, Sept. 20.—Recom
mendations thet local labor be giv
en preference on reconstruction
jobs were voiced again today by
Mgr. J. E. Bell of the chamber of
commerce.
The more jobs given to out-of
the-Valley labor, the less quickly
will this section recover from the
effects of the storm, Mr. Bell said.
It will mean more local people de
pending on relief agencies if out
siders get jobs while Valley resi
dents go jobless, he declared.
Hundreds of outsiders have come
to this section bidding for jobs
which should go to local people, he
stated. Various agencies are trying
to hold these back but many come
here in spite of their efforts.
and Jack Doss of Austin, veteran
trial h«*e, is well balanced, offer
ing everything from sluggers to
olever boxers. Resemtion* are now
on s&l« at the Batten-Wells Sport
ing Goods store.
Cabler is bearing down hard in
an attempt to get back into top
condition in time for his battle
with Doss. The Brownsville boxer
went eight rounds with Manuel
Zermeno, one of the beet middle
weights in Mexico, recently and
found that his condition was none
too good.
Doss is due back In the Valley
after headlining a card at Corpus
Christi. The veteran is anxious to
even accounts with Cabler who
once won a t.k.o. over him In five
heats.
The six rounders, five of them,
are expected to supply some of the
liveliest scrapping on the card.
Soldier Jack Burns, the best of the
current crop at Ft. Brown, is elated
to tie into a Luling slugger by the
name of K. O. Brown.
Charley Delgado of Brownsville
and “Gorilla” Morales of Laredo
will likely put on a heated scrap.
They are fast, clever bantams.
Cole It Victor
(Special to The Herald)
McALLEN, Sept. 20.— Thanks
largely to a 17 stroke handicap,
Bethel Cole of Donna won the
“depression” tournament here Suu<*
day. The Donnaite shot 41-39—80,
and his 17 handicap gave him a
63.
Dickie Turner, Charley Turner
and A. L. Hart tied for the second
and third place prices. Each card
ing net 75s. Their gross cards were
79, 87 and 93 respectively.
Champion t Named
MINNEAPOLIS, Sept. 20—(/P)
The question of who really la
champion among the wrestlers ha3
been decided so far as concerns
the National Wrestling association,
which today placed Jim Londos at
the head of the heavyweights.
At its annual meeting the mat
group also recognised Hugh Nichols
as champion of the light heavy
weights; Qua Kallio as king of the
middleweights and Jack Reynolds
as the welterweight tltleholder.
TIGHT RESULTS
NEW YORK—Lew Feldman, 130,
New York, outpointed Pete I>e
Grasse, New York, (8). Lou Salica,
118 1-2, New York, outpointed Antol
Kofcsis, 119, Hungary, (8).
SAN ANTONIO— Maxie Rosen
bloom, 178, New York, outpointed
Chuck Burns, 176, San Antonio,
(10).
EL PASO, Tex.—Chato Laredo,
113, El Paso, outpointed Baby Na
tionalista, 117, Los Angeles. (10).
I AnnonncemenU
DR. E. HILLINOER Foot specialist,
San Benito is leaving Valley.
Would appreciate those owing
bills to remit promptly. Q65
t Travel Opportunities
McAllen - Reynosa
BUS
DAILY SCHEDULE
Leaves Leaves
McAllen Reynosa
8:30 a. m. 7 30 a. m.
10:00 a. m. 9:00 a. m.
12:00 p. m. 11:00 a. m.
2:00 p. m. 1:00 p. m.
6:00 p. m. 5:00 p. m.
4:00 p. m. 3:00 p. m.
8:00 p. m. 7. l p. m,
Special bus from Reynosa Sat
urday and Sunday, 10:30 p. m.
PLAZA HOTEL, Phone 486—Want
passengers to travel in private cars
on share expense plan. Q-60.
Q-60.
SCOTTS SCRAPBOOK - - By R. J. Scott
r —" • - ■ :—
Oskar, ^ieben ;
Mo^ko brau meisSer i
SAYS ONE CAM
BECOME INlOXlCAfiD
oh 3 per cent beer
\ QUICKER ‘TAaM OM
4 per CE*rf Beer
BECAUSE.
-t&E LATTER.,
BElNq A BET1E.R
L mixture,is
MORE <31UICK.lv
m assimilated
BV -THE
1 Booy
SON«
I" /RELANO ‘
/ MUST BE
/ HEAVE//
BECAUSE MV
f mother came
FROM there*
wA6 wR.rrTEj4
By A <5ERMAKl
JEW —
FR-E-O
FISCHER.
fTTV ((CLOSTRIDIUM
)\\ MICROBE
n.r , /u csffiU«a
CLOSTRIDIUM MICROBE PLAYED A B»0 PART'lN TflE
WORLD WAR And WAS -THE MEANS °F STArTinCi A BIG
MODERN INDUSTRY — MILLIONS OF THE M ICRO-QRGAN ISMS
ea< stArcm which t&ey Turn in-To buYAnol,used in aitt&
HOBlLE LAOUER AND AIRPLANE DOPE Copyright. IMS. by Central Pres* Association. Inc. 9*18
IS Garage & Serv. Station
Wrecker Service
Day or Night
PHONE 1111
Night Phone 940
Stevenson Motor Co., Inc.
5th and Elisabeth. Brownsville
| Biuiatu Service* ~]
28 Moving, Trucks, Storage
AUSTIN TRANSFER CO. 941
Levee. Moving and crating.
Phone 431 U66
30 Fia It
Furniture Repairs
Van Heest Shop
11th and Monroe
34 Insurance
WOOD~and DODD
INSURANCE
SURETY BONDS
Phones IOC • 111
Brownsville
Spivey - Kowalski Building
x ;tt*
INSURANCE
BONDS
W. B. CLINT
Phone 4
tv ff v v w
Try The Herald
Classified Ads
dfc A db da a A
Employment, • f
35 Hip. W«nl«d • M«l« "
AT THIS TIME we Imr$ apttonga
for school boys desiring routes
with thin newspaper in towns m
Cameron County. Wort does not
interfer with school. Only toys
attending school need apply.
Write Circulation Dept Brawns
▼Uie Herald. Qfli
| Merchandise |
54 For Solo • Mi seel. .
FOR SALE—Cettoa seed coke;
cheap. C. B. Barred*.
57 Lbr. * Bldg. Mnt’l
USED LUMBER
Iron, brick, slate coated shingles
and hardware.
Stafford Lumber and Wrecking Ca
14th Street at resaca
:1 Wanted • Miscellaneous
• * . ,•>_
WANTED—We buy damaged Aer
chandise, all kinds; pay cash;
wire what you hare; bank refer
ence*. Gulf Trading Cc., 610 Preu
ton Ave., Houston, Texas.
WILL PAY cash for wrecked build
ings. Stafford Lumber-Wrecking
Co.. 14th at resaca. QCt
_Rentals_
63 Apartments
TWO ROOM Nicely furnished
apartment. $10.00 month. li(H
Madison. Q-61.
' • -■
69 Wanted to Rent
WANT TO RENT—Modem $ bed
room house; 12 months lease;
must be bargain; give location
and amount. Box Q62 Herald.
I —- ■ .- ■ ... ■ -. - - ■ -ntr
WANT 5 or 6 room house writhln
5 blocks of business district; give
price and location. Box Q67 Her
i aid. Q67
SIDE GLANCES George Clark
i s
U. 8. PAT. OfT. '
C 1933 BY NCA 3EHVICE. INC.
"Let’s stop in and see Doris. She never misses a thing you
have on.”
1 - THIS CURIOUS WORLD -
IN PAPIS,
ABOUT FIFTY TONS
OF SNAILS ARE
EATEN DAILY
DURING THE. _
LENTEN SEASON/
ACCORDING
TO AN ARAB . i
LEGEND, THE DOVE
RETURNED TO NOAH'S
ARK WITH AN OLIVE
BRANCH, AND LATER.
Kt i uwfNtD FROM A SECOND TRlR
V/ITH RED MUD ON ITS FEET, SHOWING THAT
IT HAD ALIGHTED ON THE GROUNO... AND
EVER SINCE THEN ALL DOVES HAVE HAD
G£D ASSET"AAO l£t3S AS A REWARD
FOR THEIR GOOO DEED/
stwyicr. me
GUAM,
TIN CANS ARB
planted
IN THE
GROUND
TO FURNISH
IRON
FOR GROWING
^N2GRTA6LES.

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