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The Manning times. [volume] (Manning, Clarendon County, S.C.) 1884-current, November 03, 1886, Image 2

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THE MANNIiG TES.
WEDNESDAY, DEC. I, 1886.
B. S. DINKINS, Editor.
OUR UOVERNOR.
The solemn ceremony attendant on the
inauguration of the Chief Magistrate of the
State was observed yesterday. To-day the
Hon. John Peter Richardson is the Govern
or of South Carolina. Clarendon boasts the
honor of being the birthplace of the present
Governor, and rejoices that the eminent dis
tinction has fallen to the lot of her most be
loved son. Gov. Richar Ison is a fit suc
cessor to the distinguished Shc-ppard.
MESSAGE OF TIlE 6OVERNOR.
On our outside appears a brief summary
of Governor Sheppard's message to the Gen
eral Assembly with his remarks. for the
most part, in full on the assessment of prop
erty-collection of taxes, and the Judiciary
system of the State. The message in its en
tirety is a masterly and comprehensive re
view of the condition of affairs in South
Carolina at this time. It is replete with
practical suggestions for the improvement
of the inefficient, as well as expensive parts
of the Government. These defects in the
law pointed out by Gov. Sheppard. and the
remedies recommended, merit serious and
Intelligent consideration at the hands of the
law makers of the State. Gov. Sheppard
has been the Executive of the State only a
few months, but even this short time has
been sufficiently long to open the eyes of
the.whole State to, his rare executive abili
ties. The possessor of extraordinary men
tal attainments, expansive views, and with
an extensive knowledge of the polity of this
Government, his administration ~s been
conspicuous for rare ability, wisdom and
probity displayed. Gov. Sheppard leaves
the gubernatorial chair, carrying with him
the respect, esteem, admiration, and good
will, we venture to say, of every citizen of
the State.
We are prone to attempt a cursory com
ment of the Governor's message, but time
and space at this time do not allow.
TRE STATE BAPTIST CONVENTION.
On last Thursday, the 25th, the sixty
sixth annual convention of the Baptists of
the State was convened at Columbia. The
-envention was called to order by the Pres
Ident, Col. James A. Hoyt, and on the call
ingof the roll two-hundred and twenty-five
del eg answered. An election of officers
for the next year was the first business
transacted. Col. Hoyt was re-elected Presi
dent; Rev. J. C. Furman. of Greenville,
Vice-President; Rev. A. J. S. Thomas, of
Charleston, Secretary; A. B, Woodruff of
Woodruff assistant secretary; C. H. Jud
son, of Greenville, Treasurer.
The convention continued in session from
Thursday to the followmg Monday, trans.
acting its rotine duties and interspersing
the same with interestin r ous exercis
es. The next meeting wIll be eld at Sum
ter on Thursday before the first Sunday in
December, 1887. The convention sermon
will be preached by the Rev. J. C. Browne,
with the Rev. R.N. Pratt as his alternate.
In conversation with a distinguished min
Iater, the representative of the Kews and
Obatir was told that this convention was
probably the largest ever held in South Car
olina since its organiation; that delegates
from every part of the State were in attend
ance, :md that a more enjoyable assemblage
of the 4aptists of South Carolina was never
A FEASIBLE SUGGESTION.
Senator Woodward of Fairfield, made a
happy hit when he uggested in a conversa
tion at Columbia theo er day with a num
er of his com rs, in the presence of a re
Vorterof the be=s and Courier, a tax of one
dlar on dogs, to defray the expenses of an
agricultural college. At first this novel idea
was received as a good joke. But the smile
of incredulity soon gave place to a quasi
expression of seriousness before the logic
advanced by the Fairfield representative mn
.,r of his novel idea. The Senator ar
that there were about a million dogs
anthe State, half of which were probably
.'plr os" that would of hourse have to
ibe sacrificed. But there were still about
Avehirndred thousand owned by. farmers
' ~stjpeople who would be wilint
taxproide itwas general. Ta
himaM ha 17dogs on which he was
vwligtapay a tax of one dollarper capitaz.
.Cntn r. Woodward said, that out of
ithe fivezhmiared thousand dogs it is not
:prohhist'you could get more than $20,
6O0-y a tax'which E.d not provide the
muane of enforcing it. But just let the
1!tate pass alaw as they have done in the
City of Charlesten, co'ndemning to death
every dogtibat'is not provided with a colar
a bn~e,.and ergploy dog-catchers in every
W11gIicpality anid -township. You'll find by
tthis means you will raise enough money
yzotonly to eablh an agricultural college
but to keep it a going and the farmers wont
1object to paying for their dogs when they
know the proceeds are to be devoted to the
eablshehnnt af an agricultural college.
Thinkt says he, ofthe umpetus that would
'be given to the sheep raising by the throw
.ing out of the worthless and ownerless dogs
in the State. For years there has been a
hue and cry about Ahodepredationlsin sheep
folds of ieagabond dogs. Such a law, he
concluded, as I have outlined, if strictly en
forced, would noton~ly give a revenue abun
dant to establish and support an agneultur
al college, but would rid the State of a hun
dred thousand worthless dogs which inflict
at least a hundred thousand dollars damage
'a year upon the farming interests of the
~ It appears that an agrieultural college is
an imperative necessity. N~ow the question
arises how the espenses of such an institu
tion are tobe met? It seems tous that ev
ery species of property and commodity are
already fully taxed unless it be dogs, and a
nominal tax is placed on them, which how
ever, is most frequently avoided. Senator
Woodward's plan appears to be the easiest
solution of the difficulty. The passage of
such a law, with the means provided for its
Prope execution, would be the death knel
of tousands of useless curs, to the great de
light of a legion of people, and the inestim
able benefit of the sheep growing industry
and there can be no doubt that the yearly
revenue therefrom would be sufficient to es
tablish and support the farmer's college.
The tax too would be paid by those most
able to bear it, or at least by those most
willing. The muers must heartily ap
prove it and readily see its advantage over
the fertilizer tax proposed- The burden of
the fertilizer tax would fall solely on
them, but a tax on dogs would fail equally
on all, and it is always best to tax the luxu
ries of life; and dogs are a kind of luxury
on the scale with whiskey and tobacco,. Es
pecially is this the case with the ubiquitous
'yaller" dog car and lap poodle. In the
darkey's affections his dog ranks next to
his wife and children, and, "goodness alive!
after theamost fashionable bonnet give mce
my dear little woolly poodle."
Senator Woodward's suggestion has every
ingredient to recommend it to the favora
ble action of our Legislators. Indeed they
would be wise law makers if they could
legislate to make the dogs of the land sup
port a real college.
SUMMERTON SIFTINOS.
Stoneros, S. C., Nov. 29, 1886.
There has been an unusual amount of life
in our little village for the pastweck or so.
At this season of the year, when Mr. M. S.
Cantey is engaged in the grinding of his
sugar cane and the boiling of his syrup, it
is the eqstom of the young folks and a few
of the "old rips"-the married men-to at
tend on onagnight and have a candy pull
ing. The oce' ~on this year was a most en
joyable and swi"eto all concerned.
Various other pr&have been had at
which ene of the chiet pastimes was the
larity here, so much so that more recently
it has been termed the [,Summeron game."
On last Friday night a dime reading for
the benefit of the Methodist Church, was
held at the residence of Mr. S. R. Cole.
This was quite a nice affair all of which is
due to the ladies. Reading was furnished
by Dr. B.M. Badger, and solos, instrumen
t:d and vocal, by Misses Rena Allen. Annie
Huggins, Bessie Ingram, Mrs. S. R. Cole,
and Mr. Willie Frierson, "The Closing
Year" was very creditably recited by Miss
Annie Huggins, of Manning. A handsome
little amount was realized.
Rev. M. Dargan made one of his most
happy efforts in the Methodist Pulpit yes
terday, preaching an excellent sermon toan
appreciative and attentive congregation.
His next appointment bere will be his last
for this church during the present year. His
ministry has been very pleasant and accept
able, and the church at large will be greatly
disappointed if he be not returned to this
circuit.
Rev. Mr. Garris will preach his farewell
sermon at the Presbyterian Church here on
next Sunday at 12 o'clock M. This church
will be supplied once per month afterward,
until a call for some other minister be
made.
The Trustees will give a hot supper for
the benefit of the Academy at this place on
Fridav night, the 10th of December. Some
of the'old students, still feeling a deep in
terest in the completion of this building,
and in the permanent establish ment of the
school, will act a very brilliant and exciting
dramatic performance on the same occasion,
at the Academy, for the benefit of the same.
Admission fees-adults, 25 ets.; children,
15 ets. A full house is earnesly solicited.
More next week. FanAr.
Fragments from Foreston.
Thanksgiving day was appropriately ob
served here. Divine services were held in
the Methodist Church. The pastor, Rev.
J. C. Counts officiating, assisted by Rev. W.
E. Workman, of the Presbyterian Church.
The birthday of our esteemed townsman,
Mr. R. R. Hudgins, happening to fall upon
that day, he further celebrated by "a feast
of fat things." inviting a few of his most in
timate friends-and at night the young peo
ple were invited to attend a sociable at same
place, which'they did and enjoyed them
selves very much.
Mr. W. T. Sprott, who has for some time
been confined to his room with fever, we
are happy to report is convalescent. We
were pleased to see him at his place of bus
iness yesterday.
Maj. C. S. Land, who is always "up to
snuff," "instant in season and out of seas
on," has purchased a "crusher" and will be
prepared at an early day to furnish to the
farming public crushed cotton seed.
He has already many improved imple
ments of machinery, and is giving usa liv
ing example of intelligent intensive farm
ing. His growing crop of oats is very fine.
We had divine service this morning in the
Methodist Church, conducted by the vener
able Rev. A. Nettles, and again this evening
by Eider A. J. Stokas.
I will merelv mention, lest your Man
ningites shoufd think their's the only locai
ity which can sprout orange blossoms, that
on Saturday night last our Trial Justice
united in holy wedlock. Mr. Joseph Wash
ington and Miss Hilton, all of Foreston.
F.
Nov. 28, 1886.
Pon THE MENING TDES.
The ancient Parish of Prince Frederick,
church of England, and Williamsburg
Township-Presbyterian, united to form
Williamsburg District.-known since the
war as County. Latterly it has become the
"land of Beulah" to your editor, and the
cord which binds the dominions of King
Wiliam and Lord Clarendon, has been
strengthened by another "hymenial knot."
Thanksgiving services were held at New
Market Methodist Church on the 25th inst.
A goodly number of persons participated.
The exercises were conducted by the Rev.
C. G. Harmon, using the service of the P.
E. Church. Latterly I have seen various
dates mentioned in the newspapers as the
time of the origin of thanksgiving in Amer
ica, none of which are correct, as I under
stand it.
A substantial bridge seventy-five feet and
six inches long has just been completed
across Mount Hope Swamp on the Greeley
vile road, by Mr. B. S. Smith, who is just
ly entitled to the cognomen, "Bridge Build
er."
The communication of "Farmer" in your
paper, concerning the loss of weight in cot
ton shipped to Charleston, and the action of
the cotton factors in consequence, will no
doubt eventuate in good to planters and
dealers in the staple. Greater carefulness
in weighing, and more honesty in report
ing weights will be beneficial to both seller
and buyer. Messrs. Taylor and Varner, of,
this place, have ginned and shipped about
one hundred bales the present season, the
average weight being 500 pounds, and the
average loss in weight 4 pounds, which is
nothing to complamn of. These gentlemen
are careful and attentive in the preparation
of cotton for market, and their factor em
ploys his own weigher and accounts by their
own weights, and these circumstances ac
count in large measure for the small differ
ence between the weights here and in
Charleston.
The steam saw mil at this place is being
re-established by Messrs. Win. Boyle and
Thos. Hogan. A residence and store house
is also in course of erection, and the ville
is modestly following her railroad towns in
the march of development and improve
ment.
A short but pleasant call to-day from one
of your suburba~n citizens served to revive
pleasnt memories of the "auld lang sync."
Late frosts have dispelled malaria, and
after the blow and sprinkle of yesterday the
air is bracing, so that your people who live
in the direction of the mountains" need
not fear a visit to Santee, where they are al
ways welcome. J. Mt. B.
Greeleyville, S. C., Nov. 26, 1886.
SHILOH'S CUREE will immediately re
lieve Croup, Whooping Cough and Bron
chitis.
SHILOH'S CATARRH REMEDY-a pos
itive cure for Catarrh, Diptheria, and Can
ker Mouth.
MRS. A. EDWARDS
OPPOSITE COURT HOUSE,
Manning, S. C.,
Confectioner'y,
Fresh Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts, &c., on
hand and arriving daily.
My Bakery Depart
ment is
Complete with bread and pastry.
COME AND SEE ME AND BE CON1
vinced that my prices are low and that I
cannot be undersold.
--ALSO,
Both light and heavy and always fresh,
,,- Canned Goods in endless variety.
Country trade solicited.
I thank my friends and patrons for past
favors and ask a continuance of same.
.,ii- Remember the place opposite Court
houe. Dec 17
THE
EARTHQUAKE
TIks had no offect on the immense
Stock of Goods
DAILY ARRIVING AT MY STORE,
Except to Shake the Prices IDOWN a Little.
M Y Stock this year is very large, and consists of everything needed in the
county. I have just returned from the Northern Markets, where I
bought my goods in such large quantities as to get the very lowest prices,
and I expect to sell them at corresponding figures. My salesmen will be
found polite and attentive, and every effort will be made to give my custom
ers satisfaction. Of course I cannot, in this space give anything like a list of
the goods I keep, but whatever you wish, anything, just call at my store, and
in nearly every instance you will find what you want. No other store in the
State keeps as large a stock of General Merchandize as I do.
F'AMII..C G-ROCERIES.
Stock of Fmans GRocERIEs has been selected with unusual care and my
customers will find them to be the BESrT. It is useless for me to at
tempt to enumerate what I have in this line-what you wish, I have. I buy
bacon by the 10,000 pounds, and at lowest market prices. A large supply of
FAMLY Soip on hand. Try a barrel of AcxE FLouR-THE BEr MADE.
Tobacco and Cigars.
very large stock of all grades and prices. Smoke the SWE=r YioLEr
Cigar-the best 5c. cigars in the world. The PrncE DAvE is also a
very fine cigar.
CLOTHING.
OYS, Youths, and Gentlemen will find my stock of CIo-rxHG to be un
Dusually large this year, and specially adapted to this market. Be sure
to examine my stock before purchasing. I also have a full supply of all kinds
of FUnMssHrnG Goons.
SHOES AND HATS.
I have the latest styles in HArs and SHoES, and enough for all the county,
and I propose selling them. For a cheap and comfortable shoe, buy a
pair of OUE Ow,. TREE Do.AE SHoES-every pair warranted. Babies shoes
in endless styles. A stock of the Zeigler Shoes always on hand.
Gossamers and Rubber Coats.
T HE ladies are requested to call and examine this line of goods-they are
CHEr, and just the thing for a rainy day.
Dress Goods Department.
PRCES AND QUALITY THE ATT'RACTIoN.
Cashmere, double width, Ladies' Flannels,
Diagonal Cashmere, Brocaded Sateens,
Kemingston's Sacking, all wool, Delanes,
Poplin, Lustre, Silk Warp Henrietta Cloth,
Brocaded Worsteds, Camel's Hair Cloth.
CALICOES,
CRINOLINE, WIGAND, CAMBRIC, SELICIA.
EMBROIDERIE!S.
A Ful eo f CamiMulad NainSook Edgings, Insertings, Em
ty, Everlasting Trimmings, Torchon Laces. Etc.
Zephyr Shawls, Ladies' Bonnets, Infants' Hoods, Scarfs and Sacks, Jersey
Jackets in all Styles and Colors, Solid Colored Hose, Leggins,
Corsets, Hoop Skirts, Bustles, Merio Underwear,
Gents' Shirts,
Gloves in Variety, Millinery of the Latest Style, Hats
Trimmed and Untrimmed, Window Sh a des, L aee
Curtains, Carpets, and Everything Kept in a First Class Store.
.FU RNITU RE.
I have been before the public too long in i.he Furniture Line to have to
blow too big. I have on hand in my Furniture Store all kinds of Furni
ture of every Style. Coffns at all prices, from $5 up.
:o:
RUBBER BELTING ALL SIZES FROM 2 TO 12 INCHES.
:o: --
L IBERAL advances will be made on CorroN, or it will be
bought at the Highest Market *Prices.
M O SES LE VI,
Manning, S. C.
THE TOWN TALK!
The BAnGATNs in Fall and Winter Goods at
LOUIS LOYNS'
Store, where attractions still continue.
A full line of Dress Goods, consisting of
Mohair Mixture, Diagonal
Serge, Diagonial Cashmere,
Oriole Cashmere,
Mauch Serge, Persian
Suitings and Pop
lain, Calicoes,
Harmony Lin
ings,
Eddystone Linings, Cam
brie, Selisia.
A full line of White Goods and EinbroideriesIalways on
hand.
Ladies and Misses Jersey Jackets.
Hoods and Worsted Cloaks,
Ladies Walking -Jackets,
New Markets.
Russian Circulars.
Ladies and Misses Solid Colored Hose.
Gloves, Hlaiidkerclieifs. and everything usual
lv kept in a First-class Dry Goods Store.
Gents' Furnishing Goods.
Men's, Youths' and Boys' Clothing. of latest styles and low
est prices.
BOOTS AND SHOES.
Wear the Standard Screw Fastened Boots and Shoes.
:0:
Hats and Caps
for Men, Boys and Children, of the latest styles and lowest
prices.
Fresh lot of
Farnily Groceries
always on Hand at "Rock Bottom" prices. Sole agent for The
Westminster Roller Patent Flour, the best on the Market.
Try a can of our Monumental Baking Powder for 50c., and
a lamp complete, worth 50 cents, thrown in free.
Grand Central Tea, 60c. per pound, and a china cup and
saucer put in with every pound.
:o:
FURNITURE.
I have this rear added to my general stock, a nice and
carefully selected stock of furniture, consisting of Bed Room
Sets, Bedsteads, Chairs, Tables, Matresses. Bureaus, and Zinc
safes at the very lowest market prices.
WThanks for past favors, and solicit a continuance of same.
Very Respectfully.
Sept22 LOUIS LOYNS.
SweepStakesWhiskey.
:0:
At the Saloon of S. WoLKovisKIE. Agt., the
celebrated "Sweep Stakes" Rye Whiskey, pre
pared and sold only by Messrs. Mayer, Sons &
Co., of Philadelphia. This whiskey has a nation
al reputation for its medicinal qualities.
Mr. Wolkoviskie has on hand, also, the "Ger
man Bitters," highly recommended as a liver reg
ulator.
Sep 8
STONO PHOSPHATECOMPNY,
Charleston, S. C.
Established 1870.
HIGH GRADE FERTILIZERS.
Soluble Gua no. (lighly ammolninated). LDissolred Bone,. Acidc
Phtosphate, Ash Element, Floats, Germfan Kainit, Hiigh~ Grade
Rice Fertilizer, Cotton Seed HLead.
ailAll orders promptly filled.
WILLIAM RlAVENEL, President.
R. M. MEANS, Treasurer.
For sale by M. LEVI,
Oct20 Manning, S. C.
William M. Bird & Co.,
CHARLESTON, S. C.
Counter, Platform and Cotton Scales.
Trucks, Grocers' Tinware, etc.
Paints and Painters' Material of every description. We are headquarters
for these goods and offer inducements to purchasers. Aug18
ESTABLISHED 1844.
Charleston Iron Works,
Manufacturers and Dealers in
NIarine Stationary and Portable Engines and Boilers, Saw
$1i11 Machinery, Cotton Presses, Gins, Railroad, Steam
boat, Machinists', Engineers' and Mill Supp)lies.
Milirepairs executed with prompqtness~ and Di%patch. &endfor price lits.
East Bay, Cor. Pritchard St.,
Slyr.Charleston, S. C.
OTTO F. WIETERS,
Wholesale Grocer.
wVIoLIsALE deailer in wines, Liquors~ a Segars.
No. 181 EAST BAY, CHARLES. ON, S. C.
NORTHEATERN R. RA CMPANY,
PASSENGER DEPARTMENT.
CHARLSTON, S. C., June 20, 1SS.
O N AND AFTER THIS DATE ThE fol.
lowing Schedule will be run.
Leave Charlest. No. 43 12.05 P. M.
Leave Charleston. No. 47 12.25 A. M.
Arrive Florence, No. 43, 4.10 P. 3.
Arrive Florence. No. 47, 4.11 A. M.
Leave Florence, No. 40, 1.35 A. L
Leave Florence. No. 42, 11.05 P. M.
Arrive Charleston, No. 40, 5.00 A. 3.
Arrive Charleston, No. 42. 4.5 P 1
Nos. 10 and 47 will not stop at way sta
tions.
Nos. 42, and 43 will stop at all sfttions.
No. 40 will stop at Kingstree, Lanes and
Monk's Corner.
Fast Line between CHARLESToN AND
CoLMIL AND UPPER SOUTH CAROIN;A.
(6ndensed hcltedide.
Gor,; WEST. GorNG EAsT.
7.20.A. x. Lv. Charleston, & C. Ar. ;9.10 P.m.
8.40 " Lanes, " "7.45
9.33 " " Sumter, " " 6.42
10.40 Ar.Columbia, Lv 15.27
3.02 P M. " Winnsboro, " "3.48 "
4.18 " Chester, " "12.45 "
6.05"" Yorkville, " 1"11.45 A x
7.01 " " Lancaster " " 7.00 "
5.03 " " Rock Hill, " " 2.02 P x
6.15 " " Charlotte. N. C. " 1.00
12.48 r Ar. Newberry, S. C. 1.v 3.04 1 x
2.4 " " Greenwood, I 12.44 "
6.30 " " Lanrens, " " 9.4410
4.47 " " Anderson, " " 10.22 "
5.35 " Greenville, " " 9.45 "
6.~3" " Walhalla, " " 8.20
4.10 " " Abbeville. " " 11.05 "
3.20 " " Spartanbnrg" | "1 12.10 r 3
7.10 " " Henderson'Tl " 7.00 A X
On Sundays train will leave Charleston
S. C., 8.45 A. M., arrive Columbia 1.00 P.
M. Returning leaves Columbia 5.27 P. M.,
arrives Charleston 9.45 P. M.
Solid Trains between Charleston and CoI
unibia, S. C. Special Parlor Cars attached to
this train between Charleston and Colum
bia. No extra charge for seat in these
cars to passengers holding First Class tick
ets.
T. M. Emxnsox,
Gen'l Pasz. Agent.
J. F. DIvrE,
Gen'l Sup'.
TO THE
PEOPLE OFCLARENDOY,
Having made arrangements with
the best distilleries, I am now pre
pared to furnish my customers with
the
PurestDistilledLiquors.
-o:
My stock is now complete with the
choicest brands of
Whiskies,
Brandies,.
Wines,
Cordials,
Beer,
Ale,
Porter,
Etc. Etc.
I have in stock a magnificent line,
of Cigars and Tobacco in which
I defy competition.
&MLquors f'n- Medcinal pur
poses a specudty.
I also take pleasure in introducing
the Kurnitzie's celebrated Wire
Grass Bitters; also the Carolina
Ginger Tonic. These Bitters and
Tonics are noted for their medicinal
properties.
My Pool and Billiard tables
ARE %EW AND FRs-cLAss.
Thanking the public for past pat
ronage and soliciting a continuance
of same, I remain,
Respectfully,
S. WOLKOVISKTF, AGT.
$1
13 Weekss.
-::
The PoLICE GAZETTE will be mailed,
securely wrapped, to any address in the
United States for three months on reeeipt of
ONE DOLLAR.
Liberal discount allowed to postmasters,
agents and clubs. Sample copies mailed
free. Address all ord1ers to
RtICHARD K. FOX,
Fzaixxus~ SQUnnE, N Y.
Eernard O'Neill & Sons,
Established 1845.
Wholesale Grocers
AND
COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
191 East Bay and 48 and 50 State St.,
CH.U1I.ESTON, S. O.
.$e Consignments solicitcd.
Aug~ 18
Wunlbern & Pieper
Wholesale Grocers,
AND DEALERs IN
Provisions, Liquors, Tobacco, Ete.
[679 & 16 East Bay, Charleston, S C
S, A. NELSON & Co.
Wholsaie dealers in
BOOTS and SHOES,
No. 31 Hayne St.,
ChariclLston, AS. C
Goods direct from the Manufacturers.
WVe guarantee to sell as low in prices as any
iousc in our line in the Union. Jan 13
F. N. Wilson,
INSURANCE AGEN T
MANNING, S. C.
)ec17
Px. AL LEN H~ MGINS, JR.,
DEN-rAL SURGEoN,
se Ollce on Street South of Court.
J{ouse. Meh31

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