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The Manning times. (Manning, Clarendon County, S.C.) 1884-current, November 12, 1890, Image 4

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063760/1890-11-12/ed-1/seq-4/

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THE CROOKhD CENSUS.
I NCREASING SUSPICION THAT IT IS
FRAUDULENT.
Extraordinary Inaccuracies in All Parts
of the Countrv-A Scandalous State of
Things in the Census Office--Will it be
Investigated.
The glaring inaccuracies in the Re
publican census are attracting the at
tention of the entire country.
If there were a Democratic Ihouse
of Representatives now a searching in
vestigation of the whole business would
be certain as soon as Congress reassem
bles. But if a gigantic fraud has been
attempted, the whole power of the Re
publican party will be exerted to cover
it up.
The population of 45 of the States
and Territories has thus far been an
nounced, and it is already apparent that
the total population of the country wil
be given out from 2,000,000 to 3,000,tkK
less than what it really is.
There has been a failure in the ma
jority of the States to ascertain thi
real number of people living there, and
the failure is detected in Republicar
States as well as in Democratic States
but the net losses of the Democrati
States as compared with Republicar
States are so much greater as to mdi
cate that there has been a plan on the
part of somebody to systematically un
derstate the number of persons in suet
a way as to fraudulently reduce tii<
number of Democratic Members of the
House during the next decade by a
least ten.
We believe that when all the fact!
are known it will be found that thert
has been actual fraud in New Yorl
City, and we are sorry to say that thi
character of the men at the head of thi
Census Bureau is such as to render il
by no means impossible that they hav
consented to this fraud for the purposi
of benefitting the Republican party.
If any one wants to know the char
acter of some of the men who are con
trolling thecensus work let him rea
the insolent letter of Mr. A. F. Childs
the chief clerk of the Census Bureau
to Mayor Grant, of New York. Ther
is ample evidence that the populatioi
of New York city is atileast 200,00
more than reported by Porter's censu
enumerators. The authorities of th,
city respectfully ask for an official re
count and are insulted in the publi
prints by these census officials for pre
ferring their request.
Now Philadelphia, Baltimore, Brook
lyn and other cities are demanding ;
recount and the Census Bureau ev!
dently believes that if the request i:
granted in one case it will lead to a re
count of the entire country. Tha
such, a recount may yet be had is by ni
means impossible. If the country shal
become convinced that a partisan frau<
has been attempted even a Republica:
Congress will be forced to order th
work to be done all over again, unde
a competent non-partisan directior
The incidental result will be a tremen
dous blow at Republican supremacy i1
the Nation.
Last February we published a tabl
showing the estimated population o
the several States and Territories ac
cording to the method of estimating a
employed by the actuary of the r.
Treasury, Mr. J. S. McCoy. Below w
give the estimate and the results o
Porter's count in 14 Democratic State
(giving only thousands):
Estimated Porter'
count.
Alabama.......,674 1,50
Arkansas........1,217 1,12
Delaware.........171 1
West Virginia...88
North Carolina..1.791 1,61
South Carolina..1,32 1,14
Georgia.........1,997 1,83
-Mississippi.......1,455 1,28
Louisiana........1,233 1,11'
Texas...........2,541 2,23
Kentucky.......2.033 1,85
Tennessee.......1,953 1,75.
Connecticut...... .717 74.
New Jersey...1,419 1,44
Total.......20,411 18,58
Here is a difference of two millions
and the great States of New York, Tir
ginia and Missouri are not included
on the other hand in 21 Republicar
States there is a difference of only abou
one million as will be seen from thi
folloing: stimae. Porter':
count.
Maine............668 66(
New Hampshire..385 37:
Vermont..........365 3
Massachusetts...2,130 2,23:
Rhode Island...38 34i
Pennsylvania.. ,200 5,241
Ohio............3,927 3,66(
Illinois..........3,763 3,811
Michigan......,.2,240 2,08i
Wisconsin.......1,861 1,68)
Iowa...........2,12 1,90t
Minnesota........1,287 1,0
Kana..........1,710 1,422
Nebraska.........1,135 1,05(
Colorado..........420 41(
Nevada...........454
California.......1,234 1.20.1
Oregon.,.........302 -1
North Dakota ... 330 18i
Montana..........112 131
Wahington.......27 342
Total.......29,792 28,761
We believe there should be a thorough
investigation b y s ome competent
authority at the earliest possible mo
ment of the manner in which this cen
sus has been conducted. At present
there is so much reason to suspect the
integrity of the count that the question
Is likely to grow into an important
political issue, if the Republicans at
tempt to prevent such an investiga
tion.
We alluded last week to some of the
facts relative to the management of
the Censns .zureau that are well known
to a good many people in Washington.
We believe thatin the expenditure of
the money appropriated by Congress
there has been a vast amount or cor
ruption, which will be discovered and
exposed in due season. Reports come
to us every day which convince us that
Porter's subordinates, if not Porter
himself, are making a great deal of
money out of their places. We kno w
that men who had buildings to rent.
which were fitted for the occupation os
the Census Bureau, were approached
and asked how much they would pay
to secure a lease, and if a committee of
Congress were to make the inquiry it
would probably find that money was
thus paid by some of the owners of the
buildings now rented for the Census
Bureau.
We belived that money has been cor
ruptly made by census officials out of
the electrical machines of which ..
mu has been written in the news
prs. We are informed that no less
-than 30 persons now employed in the
Census Office are compelled to pay a
part of their salaries eve ry
month to a person who has intimate
relations with both Porter and Chief
Clek Childs.
In view of the fact that Childs while
chief clerk of the Government Printing
Office amassed a fortune of overS20,000
which he subsequently lost in a busi
ness venture in this city there is noth
ingsurprising about this report. There
used to be a splendid opportunity to.
~N~emoney in the Government Prfint-'
ing Office. and favored contractors paid
large sums to the men in that oflice
who favored them.
There are graver rumors of immor
ality on the part of certain persons in
the Census Bureau, which we prefer
not to repeat at this time. The cur
rent gossip of Washington if it were
verified would certainly lead to the
immediate retirement fronm any en
ployment under the government 01
Mr. Robert P. Poter, and a number
of the men whom he has employed in
esnible place in the Census Offie.
SWALLOWED BY THE WAVES.
A Thrilling Story of Shipwreck O11
Barnegat. PC
NE W Yoiu, Oct. 31.-The Captain of
the steamer Humboldt from South
American ports. which arrived here L
to-day, reports that at 6 o'clock this
morning six miles East of Darnegat lie t
sighted a wreck and bore down to it.
The wrecked vessel proved to be the
steamer Vizcaya, which sailed from ce
hence yesterday for Havana. lie saw pc
several ipersons in the rigging and sent ,
a boat to th -i- rescue. The chief oflicer, P
second uilleer. surgeon, one engineer i
=d or
and tight of the crew were taken off 5
and brought here. The persons rescued clh
state that on the evening of the 30th P1
inst., at 6 o'clock, the steamcr was run
int o bv a four-masted coal laden m
schtooner supposed to be bound North- la
ward. !oth vessels sank within five th
minutes. Captain Cunill of the Vizeay a is
was drowred, as were also a part of g
her crew, in all about eighty-six per- a
sons, sixteen of whom were passengers. i
The tug Hercules arrived this even- p(
ing reports that the schooner Cornelius tj
Haurgrave and the Spanish steamer p
Vizeava collided at 7 o'clock on the ai
evening of the 3ilth. fifteen miles off t%
Barnegat. Both vessels sank in fifteen ir
fathoms of water. Ten men from the fr
Hlargrave and -even from the Vizcaya
were picked up by the schooner Sarah C(
L. Ia- is and were transferred to the al
Hercules The latter proceeded for the ir
wreck to render assistance, but at mid- .
night met the tug Battler, which had a
been to the scene and found both ves- di
sels sunk and all hands gone. She pick- it
ed up the body of a woman. The sur- f
vivors report that nearly a hundred w
people were clinging to the wreck at st
one time. The survivors have been bi
landed at Lewes life station, also the tt
corpse of the woman picked up. She oj
is reported to have been the stewardess s
of the steamer- tc
Dr. Rico, the ship's doctor, tells this oJ
story : The weather was fine, the moon ir
shone bright and the sea was smooth. a]
The ship was in charge of the first al
oflicer, who was on the bridge. I was in
the saloon talking with Mrs. Calvo, n,
when su(denly I heard the stop signal. C
Before 1 could even wonder what it te
was for, there came an awful shock, a d<
crashing, scraping sound on the deck ai
over our heads, and the steamer rolled s,
well over on her port side. Every- a1
body in the saloon was thrown d3wn- ri
All was excitement, men, women and
children shrieking for help. I started S
up to the deck. A terrible scene of s;
confusion met my eyes. The bridge, t,
deck house and fore ri-ging were all -
torn away. There was a great gash in h
the starboard side, just abaft the coal si
bunkers, and into this opening the g
water poured. s:
Close by, on our starboard beam, was C
a big four-masted schooner with her
bowsprit and forerigging gone and her a
boats stove in. She, too, was filling s
rapidly. li
Men were running here and there all t
over the decks, shouting all kinds of tl
orders. The steamer was fast sinking. f4
With the wild idea of saving onrselves, C
several of us scrambled up the port 1
forerigging. Down ient the steamer
and up we climbed. We reached the c
foretop gallant and the bull reached t]
the bottom. This left usjust above the t
surface of the water, but every swell 7
drenched our lower limbs. p
There were twelve of us in the rigg- a
ing. Some of our crew had tried to 5
reach the schooner, but she had gone to t1
the bottom almost as quickly as the c
Vizeaya had. One of the men said a i
boat with seven mna from the schooner a
was rowed away.
All through the night we clung to p
that yard, growing colder and stiffer h
as each hour passed. Toward day- 11
break a cold fog settled on us and made
autters worse. W hen one of the party ec
said he thought he heard a psssing tl
steamer, we all hallooed as loud as we a:
could.- Then a boat made its appear- b
anice, and we were taken on board the
H umboldt. We could not have endur-|a
ed the ordeal longer-. t
Prom the second oflicer some facts
were obtained, ie was standing on a]
the uprdeck under the bridge when
the colsnoccurred. Hie said the
steamer's lights were burning all right A
and the watch on deck were at their A
posts. Ie did not see the schooner A
until the first oflicer on the bridge rang Ca
the bell to stop. At the time he rang Ci
the bell to stop, said second officer Ci
Covas, Capt. Cunill had jutst came 1)
from supper, and was going up on the D.
bridge. Before we had time to move y
the schooner struck us, and as far as I C,
could see, instantly killed Capt. Cunilt' 10
Our headway carried it along and the H1
bowsprit knocked down the bridge it
house and rigging. 1 was covered by Ic
debris and was badly cut in the head i(
and side of the neck. I got out of the K
tangle about the time the water com- L~
menced to run over, and then I took to 11
the rigging with the others. We stay- 31
ed there from 9 in the evening until 31
5 next morning, and were completely 31
exhausted when taken off by the crew M
of the Humboldt. 3
The Deadly Electric Wire.
PITTSBURG, Oct. 31.-A specialtrom N
Blrodycr, Pa., says: A horrible accident x
occurredI in the Edgar Thompson steel N
works last night, which was due to the N
careless bravado of~ the victim, a colored N
man named Robert Washington. lHe N
hails from Culpeper, Va., and has been N
working as a bricklayer's laborer. N
It was noticed by Superintendent 0]
Pierce. of the Carnagie Electric Light 01
Company, that Washington had often O
grasped the electric light wire when thec
current was turned oflf in order to show s
the men he was not afraid. lie was Sc
warned by Pierce that he would be TE
caught, Pierce telling him several times TE
that he was doing a very foolish thing. L'
Last night at 10 o'elock Washington V<
was seen to climb up several steps and Vi
reach out his hand toward the electric WV
lght lamp. Some one shouted a warn- W
ing to him, but too late. His hand A
touched the wire and in an instant his W
frame stitrened and he fell to the iloor
below dead. Not a muscle twitched and i
his death must have been instananous.
His right hand had touched the wire
and his left, clinging to an iron rod, had ha
completed the circuit. There was not a (de
mark on the man excelpt-on his right ]
hand, were a slight scar was found ti
where he had grasped the wire k
de:
Will serve Nine Years for $12,0oo. SO
NEW YoRK, Oct. 30.-Cassin. the dii
young bell boy who robbed the Ihotel Nc
Vendomne safe of a tin box belonging to vi
Bookmakers Sanders and Carlin, con- ha
taning nearly $17,000, was sentenced
to nine years at hard labor in the State na~
prison by Recorder Smyth yesterday in thE
the General Sessions. cai.
The Recorder asked him what he for
had done with the 512,000 that has not I27(i
yet been recovered, and he replied sej
rather ilippantly that 'the thief who y;
stole it must have it." The Recorder
sternly informed him that he was the
thief ~and said lie would make an ex- (
ample of him. Ie then imposed lov
sentence. Mr
WYhen Cassin heard the sentence he. on
walk, d back to the "-pen" with a self- ilot
satisled1 air. Hie gut one year less than gea
ten years that he told John O'Brien, ril
who~ refused to join him in the theft, har
that he was "willing to serve" in order enc
to have the stolen cash at the close ofse
his imprisonment. ing
Ipry
AccoR1)ixo to the New York Press, e'd,
good republican authority, the work- fier
ingmien of this country must not exp~ect mo
to be beneited by the new tariff law for on
a long time to come, and it ingeniousiy
advises them to be piatienit under their 'J
increased living expenses. This advice res
might be more generally takenm by the its
workingmen if they did not fully realize sha
that the same law which is making them tiet
poorer every day is piling up unearned wil
POTE'S FIGURES.
PULATION OF THE UNITED STATES
PLACED AT 2,480,540.
ie Extcuse Vh'y the i ;;;ures of the
0opululation Are Not aLTar;;e as An
icipated-le Claiis Thtat the Census o
he South Was Verv Defect Ive.
W~AsmlN'rox. Oct.31.-The twelft
asus bulletinl issue to-a sy:Lh
p;lation 'ft he nited t aI 1n .1
18S0. as shownV~ by thet lrt.~ iinn e
r7sons and! faiii e--.exlui - of whillt
rsons a o n i ndhan 't 'ri I \ . I dil:
reservat n ( anI ask. was 12 J."1
1. 'Th- Iigurcs ma1:V bo slightly
iinged h% later and imiore exact com.
!Lations. lit su:ch changes Will not h)
ferial.
In 1s',O the population w 0.)
3. Tnc absolute increase of the popu
ion in ten years was 12.32-4.5s, an
e percentage of increase 24.57. Ir
7o the pepulation was stated at 3
8.371. According to these igure- th<
solute increase in the decade betweel
70 and 180) was 11517,412, and th<
reent age o f increase w as 30.08. Upor
eir face these figures show that th(
pulation has increased between in
id 1890 oiyV 727,315 uiore than bi
een 1870 and 18S0, while the rate o:
crease has appa rently diminishe'
oi 30.CS to 21.57 per cet..
If these figures were received fron
*rrect dal a, they would be indccd dis
)pointing. Such reduction in rate 0:
crease in face of the enormous imimi
ation during the past ten years vwoulk
gue a grat diminution in the fecun
ty of the population or a correspond
g increase in its death rate. Thesi
.ures are, however, easily explaine<
hen the character of the data is under
ood. It is a well known fact, iaving
en demonstrated by an extensive an(
orough investigation, that the censu:
1870 was grossly deficient in th
uthern States, so much so as not onl,
give an exaggerated rate of increasi
the population between 1870 and 11S1
these States, but to effect very n:ateri
lv the rate of increase in the countr:
large.
These omissions were not the fanl
)r were t hey within the control of h
nsus oflice. The census of 1870 wa
ken under a law which Superinten
nt Walker characterized as "clunsy
itiquated and barbarous." The Cen
is oflice had no power over its enumer
:ors save a barren protest, and thi
ght was questioned in some quartern
In referring to these omissions th
iperintendent of the tenth censu
id, in his report in relation to th
Ling of the census in South Carolint
t follows, on the conclusion of th
ighest authority, either that the cen
is of 1870 was grossly defective in re
ird to the whole State or some coi
derable parts thereof, or else that th
nsus of 1880 was fraudulent."
Those. therefore, who believe in th
curacy and honesty of the tenth cer
is-and that was thorougly estat
shed-must accept the other alterno
ve offered by General Walker, namel
iat the ninth census was "grossly dt
etive." What was true of Sout:
arolina was also true, in a greater o
ss degree. of all the Southern States.
There is, of course. no means of al
rtaininig accurately the extent o
iese omissions, but in all probabilit
icy amount to not less than 1,50tJX
here is but little question that th
apulation of the United States in 187
as at least 40.000,000 instead of *38
i,371. as stated. If this estimate o
ie extent of the omissions in 1870 b
rrect, the absolute increase betweei
70 and 18 was only about 10,0000(
ad the rate of increase was not fa
-om 25 per cent. These ligures com
are much more reasonably with simi
r deductions from the population i
So and 1890.
It will be seen that the absolute it
-ease between 1880 and 1890 exceedei
mt between 1870 and 1880 by 1.5,602
id that the proportional increase wa
it 1.2 per cent. less.
The population of the several State
found by the census enumeration (
te United States in 1890 is 62 248,54(
The following are the populations c
the States, as announced.
Increas
States. 1890. since 188(
labama.........,u8,073 245.56
rizona............ 59, 691 19,24
rkansas.........1,125.3s5 32,28
difornia.........1,24,002 :-39.30
mnecticut.......410,975 216,64
>orado............ 745.861 123,16~
alaware.........167871 21.2'
st. of Columbia... 229,790 52,17
orida............ 390,435 120,94
~orgia...........134,366 292,18
aho.... ....... ..84,229 51,61
i nois.... ........,,53 74u06
diana......... .2,189,030 210.72
wa.............1,06,729 282,11
msas..........1423,485 4)7,33
entucky.........1,55.43G3 206,74
)uisiana..........l16,828 17Gs5,
aine.............. 60,261 11,32
aryland.........1,00,431 10.,44
assachusetts...1,233,407 4150,32
ichigan..........2087,792 452.85
innesota ........1,300,017 519,24
ississippi.........1.284887 597,45
issouri.... ......2,77,980 512,02
ontana...........131,769 93,61
abraska.........1,0:3G,793 6304,39
avada............ 44327 17,93
aw hampshire..375,837 28,83
ew Jersey.........1,441,017 309,90'
aw Mexico........144,862 25,29
aw York.... .....5.981.934 899.06;
rth Carolina...1617,340 217,59(
rth Dakota...182,425 145.514
110................3,066,719 468,6;5
lahomia.........56,36;4 56.36
egon............312,490 137,76f
nnsvlvania....248.574 891.99;
ode Island.......34534:3 68,81:
uth Carolina..l.146,1t;1 151,58s
uthi Dakota...327, 848 229.5s'
n essee.. .. .... . 763.723 221,3t;
xas ... ........ ...2,232.220 440,471
ah .... .... ....... 20,498 (;2.53L
~r ont..... .... 332. 5 81
rginia.......1,648,911 133,581
ashington.. ....349,54 274,40~t
ist Virginia.... 760,448 14,191
isconsin 1.... ..,8,97 :368,40t
voming....... 6059 39,80C
)itting from the consideration
>e States in whi1ch the. census of 187(
sowni or is presunmed to have leen
ilty, the rate of increase between
0 arnd 180 mn the remaining States
sbeen very nearly maintained in the
ade iset ween 1880) and 1890.
leferrimr~ to the principal table of
bulle tin, the census of 1870 is
w n, or is presumedl to have been,
cient in nearly all the States of
th Atlaintic and Southern central
iions, while in the North Atlantic,
thern Central and Western di
ions 110 evidence of incompleteness
been discovered.
he population of these three last
ned divisions in 1870 and 1s90 and
absolute increase jfor the two de
es and the rate of increase is set
tl as follows: Population 1870,26;.
351; 1880, 33.6:39.215. Increase. 7,
,864. or 28.1 per cent.; 1890, 42,:9:3,
icreatse of 9.054,467; per cent. 26.9.
A Pistol in the Legi.-datutre.
TIumE, Oklahoma, Oct. 30.- In the
e house of the Legislature to-day
Terrill of iPayne,not being sustained
a point of order, drew a pistol antd
rished it over his lead. Tihe Ser
ntat-Arms relieved him of it. Ter
then ran toward the (loor, which
l been locked to prevent interfer
e from the lobby, and giving it
eral hard kicks broke it open. Runsh
out into the street, bareheaded, he
cured another revolver and return
this tim~e keeping it concealed. So
cel did he oppose the capitol re
val bill that all acti is postponed
it until Novembecr 10.
'nE; Socialist Congress at JIalle, has
lved that no0 one shall be received int
new party who may have beeni or:
11 be guilty of any dishonorable prac
s. Th'lis is extremely ediying, and
keep the mnembers fromi being un
SMITH, OF BRYAN, TEXAS.
L' l'!aycd a Lone Hand and the Law
E"uchred Him.
Joseph iSmith. a breezy young man
from Bryan, Brazos county, Texas,
was tried in the General Sessions yester
day for stealing a gold rinz. valued at
two dollars, from the linger of' Henry
Micaelis, a schooi boy. of 105 east
Fourth street, Judge (Cowing asked
Sm it if he had counsel.
Oh, no" lie answeredjauntily. --I
,ueissI ca'n handle this outlit alo e."
adn'tx ou better have counsel," sue
ested ue U (Cowing. "I will assign a
aw er- to def'end you, I you can't pay
one. The criminal law in the State of
New Y ork is himLe to the last degree
whatever it may be in Texas. Every
mai tried here has the right to counsel
fee. he ca1n't pay for counsel.''
smith looked the lawyers who were in
the court-onm over, and theu said that
I he guesseu lie could go it alone. Never
t theless Judge Cowing requested lawyer
James A. eILoughliu to see that all of
Smith's rights were preserved.
Young MNichaelis told a plain tale of
robberv in the street. Then niith tried
his hand at cross-examination.
*Did I run away after. as you say, T
stole your rigi" he asked.
"No. sir." responded tile boy.
"idn'L you hit me on the knuckles
with anl iron bar, and didn't I take it out
of your hand, that's the reason you
charge tme with stealing your ring?"
--No, sir.'' was the reply; "you stole
- my ring."
"lie did hit me. gentlemen," com
- iented Smith. turmng to thejury. "I've
got the marks on my knuckie yet."
"You must not sum up yet, Smith,"
said Judge Cowinz. -That's not the
practice in New York. You must cross
examine now. Later you can give your
own testImony, and then you can sum
up.
"All right. Judge," observed Smith,
traquilly. "That's one on me. I'll do
oetter next time.''
"If 1 had been a thiet and had stolen
your ring, wouldn't I hi-ve run away,
Klichaels?" he asked.
"I don't know about that," was young
Michiaell's doubting reply.
"Welil I would have," rejoined Smith.
.Thieves always run away."
Now, there you are summing up
again, Sith." interposed Judge Cow
in
. Beg, pardon again, Judge,"1 was the
e prompt answer.
s henry Gust, a schoolboy, who was
e with young Michaelis when the ring was
stolen, corroborated him. Policeman
e McCrA tetified to the arrest. Smith's
cross-examiration of both these witnes
ses was also an endeavor to show that,
e becvu. lie did not runaway, he could not
have stolen the ring.
e "Don't thieves always run away, offi
- cer'' he asked Policeman McCarthy.
.I don'L know about that," replied the
- policemon. "I suppose they do, if they
get a chance-but you didn't get a
chance."
The spectators laughed, and Smith be
r gan to wcep. But then he recovered his
composure. and, going on the witness
f stand, he denied that he had stolen the
ring. le insisted then upon summing
up in his own behalf. ie virtually
e confessed his guilt in his openIlng sea
0 tence.
"Judge. your honor. and gentlemen of
f the jury." lie said. -please pardon me
e this time, aad I'll show y'ou beitr be
a havior next time. I've taken out papers
) to vote here, but I don'tcare about that.
r Let me go. and Il go back to Texar
about as fast as I car,"
But the jury d dided that they could
not part with Smith. Without quitting
-their seats they convicted him. His
tears rained down his bronze face in
dead earnest then. Judge Cowing sea
S tencedl Smith to the Ste to prison for four
years .-New York Sun.
A liankrupt Poisons Himself.
ArLANra. Nov. 4.-W. J. Barbeld,
fa well-to-do merchant of Palmetto, end
ed his life by swallowing the contents of
e a phial of laudanunm in the St. James
).Iotel on Sunday night. HeI caime to the
8 city yesterday afternoon, wvent to the
1hotel and was assiigned a room. The
- rules of the house require tiat guests
shall put out the gas by midnight. At
le the gas in MIr. Barfield's room was
burning brightly, andi the landlady
Sknocked on his door and requested that
h le put it out, ie did so piomptly.
i; asking her pardon for having kept it
9 burning. Next morning when the ser
9e vant knocked at his door to call lia to
9i breakfast, there was no response. Bar
I field was found lying dead in bed as if
i lie had fallen to sleep. There was some
money, gold watch and several papers
'mhis pockets. IHe had written his
name and address with a pencil on one
of his cuflfs and left it in a conspicuous
place on the bed. Earlield was a promi
nant merchant of Palmetto. lie was
Sabout thirty-six years of age and leaves
a wife and six children. Financial
)embarrassment led him to take his own
[life. _________
Nearly Wiped Out.
PEomA. ILL., Nov. 1-The business
portion of the town of Chillicothe was
almost entirely destroyed by fire last
night. The Pre originated in Hancock's
livery stable and sprtad rapidly in all
dir ections. The mayor of this city was
appealed to for help and in response a
special train with lire engines was dis
patched to the scene, but as there were
no means of unloading the machines
they could not be utilized. The tele
graph and telephone offices were burn
ed and all communication was cut off
so that it is im possible to obtain details
as~ yet. The loss will not fall short of
i200,ou nne which there is only par'ial
Tm: Philadelphia Press is candid
enough to admit that the next House
may be Democratic. In view of this it
may become necessary for Mr. Reed to
formulate new rules whereby two D)em
ocrats will be required to cast one vote.
Game to Sumter
aind inspect my large stock of Clothing,
I1:nts, .shoes, (ents' Furnisnaing Goods, Dry
Goods, Hardware, G;roceri es. Tinware,
CrOCkery, in fact everythinthtiketn
a, fis class ht sketi
GENERAL MERCHANDISE STORE.
I will give izy customers special bargains
anti pay the highest prices for Hides, Furs,
andJ all kinds of country produce.
I M. K AR E SH,
Liberty Street, Sumter, S. C.
WAVERLY HOUSE,
In bend of King Street,
CHARLESTON, S. C.
Nely fnuished&. Electric bells. Electric
lights in all rooms and hallway's. Rates,
;e2and $2.50. G. TI. ALFORD, Proprietor.
CHARLES C. LESLIE
Whlsl I R. et.il Commission Dealer in
C2ons~inments ofI poultry, eggs, and all
kinmd. of counitry produce are rospectf'ully
O2'lee N.;s. 18 & 20 MIarket St., E. of East Bay
('IT.XlLESTN, S. C.
PEOPLE OF
I have just returned from the North with
the largest and best assorted stock of
General Merchandise
that has ever been offered by me since I
have been in the business. I am prepared
to compete with the largest merchants in the
town. My stock consists of
DRESS GOODS, TIMMINGS, HOME
SPUNS, PANTS GOODS
of all kinds, and in fatet evervtling that is
kept in a
Dry Goods Store.
I also have the best assortment of GENTS
FURNISHING GOODS in town, and my
Clothing and Hats
I can sell cheaper than any one else. Ifyon
want first class family and plantation
GROCERIES,
give me a trial, and I will convince you that
it is to your interest to buy from me.
C. KARESH,
Manning, S. C.
BRUNSON HOUSE,
SUMT ER, S. C.
First class accommodations and excellent
table. Convenient to the business portion
of the town. 25 cents for dinner.
J. H. NXON, Proprietor.
1. WULBERN & Co.
WHOLESALE GROCERS.
Flour a Specialty.
Nos. 171 and 173 East Bay Street,
CHARLESTON. S. C.
M. Drake & Son,
-WHOLESALE
BOOTS, SHOES, & TRUNKS.
235 Meeting St., CHARLESTON, S. C.
L?rgest stock, best assortment, lowest prices.
R. T. McGAHAN. A. S. BROWN. SOUT. r. EvANS.
McGAHAN, BROWN & EVANS,
JOBBERS OF
Dry Goods, Notions,
Boots, Shoes and Clothing,
Nos. 226, 228 & 230 Meeting Street,
CHARLESTON. S. C.
S. THOMAS, Jr. J. M. THOMAS.
Stephen Thomas, Jr. & Bro.
WArTCII4S,
JEWELRY, SILVER & PLATED WARE,
Spectacles, Eye Glasses & Fancy Goods.
.r'eWatches and Jewelry repairea by
competent workmen.
'257 KING STREET,
CHARLESTON, S. C.
ESTABLIHED 1836.
Carrington, Thomas & Co.,
--DEALERS IN
WA.TOTTB,
JEWELRY, SILVERWARE AND FANCY GOODS,
No. 251 King Street,
CHARLESTON, S. C.
A. McCOBB, Jr.
General Commission Merchant,
LIME, CEMENT, PLASTER PARIS, HAIR, FIRE
BRICKS, AND FIRE CLAY, LAND PLAS
TER, AND EASTERN HAY.
Agents for White's English Portland Cement.
191 & 196 East Bay, Charleston, S. C,
JOHN F. WEUNEEi. L. H. Qurnou-o
JOHN F. WERNER & CO.,
Wholesale Grocers
---AND
Provision Dealers,
164 & 166 East Bay and 29 & 31
Vendue Range,
OHA4R LESTON,~ S. 0.
BOLLMANN BROTHERS,
Wholesale
Grocers,
157 and 169, East Bay,
CHARLESTON, S. C.
JOHN T. CONNOR,
Cotton Factor
-AND
--COMMISSIUN MERCHANT
KERR's WAHA F,
CHARLESTON, S. C.
Solicits consignments of cotton on which
ibral advances will be made.
"AROUND THE CORNER"
SALOON.
pposite J1. Ryttenberg &. Sons' Grocery on ]
LIBERTY STREET.
Give me a call when you come to ~
sumtcr, and I will guarantee satisfac- I
ion to one and all. Fine liquors and e
pure North Carolina corn whiskey a
~pecialty, also fancy chinks. ..
A. P. LEVY. J
STALLION DEXTER.']
D EXTER, ONE or THlE FINEST STAL- r
lions in the county, will stand at Jor-f ii
Ian the next two months, or will meet en- je
~ageents in any part ofteT cony n
Sep 1,ISOO J20.ordan. S. C.
F N. WILSON,
.;EVT EQUITABLE LIFE AS
SIIASCE SOCILTi;
MANNING. S. C.
USEPH F. RITAME,
A''OJ|3EY A T L.t W,
MANNIN G, S. C.
OHN S. WILSON,
At!<'nu'y aind L'uun.,elor al Law,
MANNING, S. C.
LEVI.
. 1'iT:SNEl'A T LA W,"
MANNING, S. C.
;? N.t-0 l'ublic with sad.
A4 L!NIUGGINS, D. D. S.,
A CLILAW, S.
Zh-Visits Manning every month or two
professionally.
JOB PRINTING.
T HE TIMES OFFICE IS FITTED UP IN
a manner that warrants it in soliciting
your patronage for job printing. Send us
your orders which shall have prompt atten
tion. Prices as low as the cities. Satisfac
tion guaranteed. Keep us in mind.
FORESTON DRUG STORE,
FORESTON, S. C.
I keep always on hand a full line of
Pure Drugs and Medicines,
FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, TOILET
SOAPS, PERFUMERY, STATION
ERY, CIGARS, GARDEN SEEDS,
and such articles as are usually kept in i
first class drug store.
I have just added to my stock a line of
PAINTS AND OILS,
and am prepared to sell PAINTS, OILS
LEAD, VARNISHES, BRUSHES,
in quantities to suit purchasers.
L.W. NETTLES, M.D.,
Foreston, S. C.
A. S. J. PERY. X. R. sDtONs. R . A. PRINGLE.
Johnston, Crews & Co.,
-WHOLESALE
JOBBERS OF DRY GOODS.
Notions and Small Wares,
Nos. 49 Hayne & 112 Market Streets
CHARLESTON, S. C.
TI-E
MUTUAL LIFE INSURANGE CO
OF NEW YORK.
R. A. McCURDY, Prest
Assets, $136,401,328.02.
Surplus, $9,657,248.44.
The oldest, strongest, largest, bes
company in the world. It "makes as
surance doubly sure."
E. IB. Cante., Agent for Iershaw anz
Clarendoni, Camden, S. C.
ED. L. GERNAND,
GENERAL AGENT,
Columbia, S. C.
GRAND CENTRAL HOTEL,
COLUMBIA, S. C.
Is the largest hotel in the city, and has
during the past year, been thoroughly reno
vated, remodeled, and refitted with all mod
ern improvements. Centrally located, ani
offers inducements for the accommodatioI
of its patrons. Has 6 spacious, light, ani
airy sample rooms. Hot and cold baths, el
evator, &c. Cuisine under supervision o:
Mr. E. E. Post, late of Lookout Point Hotel
Lookout Mountain, Tenn. The proprietoi
hopes by strict attention to the wants of hi~
patrons to merit a share of patronage.
F. W. SEEGERS, E. E. POST,
Proprietor. Manager.
E I
SWO CD W OR1K AffAefHMEN1'l~
-= co. 28 UNIONSQUARE.N. sAr~.
CH.ILL'' ,-ALANTA.GA~.w. AL -I.
sT.LOUls.VD. :RSE~BYDALLks.TEX.
W. E. BROWN & CO., Manning, S. C.
PHILADELPHIA SINGER.
High Low
Arm, Arm
$28. .$20.
1*2.A.WO C . I':, ..
g ShtGus S4t 2. Evr, ido
Don'krs, aen 2 56 or 60, bll kinds fo Cuar
ents Cfor IlWstatd Caaou.drs
UN WOtRKS itsbu~r Pa.r
EIR NETTENTS ANDISTIALL EOOD
oecutred, and tohav0.ingldoe witceh Loadt
zorg Specia atn,$tion$ Every kin shmof
4;; Muzdies oadi Dobe Shaosiderab,
perience. ingleera arge Guns, and touar2
teiers aifato to $20 custoers.io Parlr
ocerxt door to annin lindoCr
J. ADGK, SMYTH. F. T. PELZLR, Spelal Par t
SMYTH & ADOER,
Factors and Commission Merchanls,
Nocr-th. Atlzatlac "%XbUiarf,
CHARLESTON, S. C.
OTTO F. WIETERS,
WHOLESALE GROCER,
Wholesale Dealer in Wines, Lionuors and Cigars,
No. 121 East Bay, Charleston, S. C.
OTTO TIEDEMAN & SONS,
Wholesale Grocers and Provision Dealers,
172, 174, and 176 East Bay Street,
C _-_ R - 3 E0 9 T ON S. C.
F. T. PELZER, President. F. S. RODGERS, Treasurer.
Atlantic Phosphate Company,
C;3XA 3R "USWC)TV, 5. C;.
MANUFACTURERS OF
STANDARD FERTILIZERS,
AND IMPORTERS OF
3iure Glerman 3i.alnait.
PELZER, RODGERS, & CO., General Agts.,
BROWN'S WHARF, CHARLESTON, S. C.
MR. M. Lxnv, of Manning, will be pleased to supply his friends and %he public gen.
ally, with any of the above brands of Fertilizers.
B. B. BnowN, Pres. JoHN 1. HuvcNsoN, Manager. T. H. McC.u., Gen. Supt & Tress
Charleston Mattress M'f'g Company,
LNCORIORATED 1889.
TANTFALCTI S C)OF
High Grade Moss, Hair, and Wool Mattresses.
Wholesale Jobbers and Manufacturers in all Kinds of
3P U. Rt N% X TiU R 30, 3E; Tr 0.
Capacity, 250 mattresses per day. Capacity, 500 pillows per day. Write for price list.
Will pay highest prices for corn shucks.
Office and Sales Room 552 and 554 King St., CHARLESTON, S. C.
MOLONY & CARTER,
COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
Dealers in Corn, Oats, Bran, Hay, Flour, Feed.
244 & 246 Meeting St., Opp. Pavilion Hotel, CHARLESTON, S. C.
fB-Contracts made for car load lots or less.
W. E. HOLES. LErLND Moo.
W. E. HOLMES & CO.,
-DEALERS In
White Lead and Colors,
Oils and Varnishes,
t Glass and Brushes,
Miland Naval Store Supplies.
STREET LAMPS and LANTERNS ofALL KINDS.
OFFICE, 207 EAST BAY, CHARLESTON, S. C.
EVERYTHING IN THE PAINT, OIL, AND CLASS tNEL
W M. M. BIR D & CO.,
*CHARLESTON, S. C.
STATE AGENTS FOR lMARVIN'S SAFES AND
I-OWE SCAL~ES.
ESTABLISHED 1844.
Charleston Iron Works,
Manufacturers and Dealers in
Marine Stationary and Portable Engines and Boilers, Saw
Mill Machinery, Cotton Presses, Gins, Railroad, Steam
boat, Machinists', Engineers' and Mill Supplies.
Mil1?Rpairs executed with promptness and Disatch. Sen dfor price lists.
East Bay, Uor. Pritchard St.,
_Charleston, S. C.
PUOKHABER BROS.,
Wholesale Bak~ery and Candy Factory.
AGENTS FOR HOLMES &. COUTTS SEAFOAM WAFERS AND ENGLISH BISCUITS'
464 and 466 King St., CHARLESTON, S. C.
PERCIVAL MFG. CO.
S -.DOO RS. AND BLIND S. WA 8tot3 :Jatin.; St.. C ol mi D .C .
THE BEST AND THE CHEAPEST,
All goods guaranteed. Estimates furnished by return mail. Large stock, promp,
shipments. Our goods do not shrink or warp.
Geo. E. Toale & Company,
MANUFACTUREES OF AND WHOLESALE DEALET'.s IN
Doors, Sash, Binds, Moulding, and General Building Material.
Office and Salesrooms, 10 and 12 Hayne St., CHARLESTON, S. C.
OLD CLOTHES MADE NEW.
SEND YOUR DYEING TO THE
CHARLESTON STEAM DYE WORKS,
All work guaranteed. 310 King St., CHARLESTON, S. C.
SMOKE HENO CIGAR, THE BEST NICKLE CIGAR SOLD.
B. A. JOHNSON, Sole Agent, Manning, S. C.
SOL. ISEMAN, Wholesale Grocer, Slate Agent,
Lilienthal & Blohme,
Successors to F. J. Lilienthal & Son, Proprietors of
And dealers in Prepared Flour, Grist and Meal, also Hay, Griun, Flour, Mill Feed,
etc. Send for prices.

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