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The Manning times. [volume] (Manning, Clarendon County, S.C.) 1884-current, September 17, 1902, Image 2

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LUIS APPELT, Editor.
MANNING, S. C., SEPT., 17, 1902.
PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
One year... - - -............... $1 50
Six months --.--------.....................
Four months...--- - - --....................... 50
ADVERTISING RATES:
One square, one time, $1; each subsequent in
sertion, 50 cents. Obituaries and Tributes of
Respect charged for as regular advertisements.
Liberal contracts made for three, six and twelve
months.
Communications must be accompanied by the
real name and address of the writer in order to
receive attention.
No communication of a personal character
will be published except as an advertisement.
Entered at the Postoffice at Manning as Sec
ond Class matter.
FARMERS, LOOK TO YOUR INTERESTS.
We note from the correspon
dent of the News & Courier in
last Friday's issue that at Ker
shaw in Lancaster county, the
farmers are receiving 40 cents
per bushel for cotton seed. Why
this price should be paid at Ker
shaw we cannot understand,
there is no oil mill at that point,
but there are a number of agents
competing for the seed to ship
to their respective mills. Within
this territory of the seven mill
association. the price for seed is
24 cents, the same being paid by
each mill in the association, but
we suppose the farmer is to be
given the benefit of the reduced
price paid, when he goes to buy
his meal. The seven-mill-as
sociation will no doubt sell the
meal at nearly one half less, than
the mills which paid nearly
twice as much for seed. We
shall wait and see. Perhaps af
ter the farmer gets hit real halr
he will discover that something
s- wrong and a remedy must be
found.
There is but one way to hold
off the cotton oil trust to keep
it from eventually bringing dis
aster to our farming interests,
and that way is, for the farmer
to keep his seed. The land-lord
should make it a stipulation in
his rent contracts,that the tenant
must put his seed back into the
ground. A prominent farmer of
our acquaintance says: "I would
not sell my cotton seed at any
price, but will buy all I can get,
I own stock in an oil mill, be
cause it is profitable, but the
man who sells his seed, will buy
corn, the man who buys corn,
will mortgage his home, and the
man who mortgages his home,
will sooner or later be walking
the road." There is much to
ponder over in the conclusions
of this man. He speaks words
of wisdom, and we would be the
last to say a word against any
institution making money, be
cause we want all the enterpris
es we can get, but when there
comes one upon us a creature
with attractive plumage, and
glittering bill, and we see that it
-is a menace to our people, we
but perform an honest duty to
give them our sincere views and
warn them of the danger. In our
opinion no greater curse has ever
come to our farmers than the in
troduction of these oil mills;they
induce the farmer to sell the very
life-blood of his lands, and
with certificates from hired
chemists, they would try to make
the farmer believe that cotton
seed meal is the very thing, and,
that the seed put into the ground
is a waste. These paid scien
tists say there is no fertilizing
property in the oil, we do not
believe them, because, from per
sonal observation we have seen
the effects of the oil. Take a
pile of cotton seed and let it
stand for some time, then scatter
them over the field, the spot
where the pile stood will be no
ticed for several years, why is
this? Because the oil is absorb
ed into the ground, and it is
the oil which enriched that spot.
In our opinion, meal is a tempor
ary plant stimulant; its effect
is upon the plant,is like the effect
of morphine upon the human
system; a certain quantity will
exhilarate, an over dose will
stupify. Cotton seed meal in
certain quantities will exhilarate
the plant, too much will stunt it,
and as the plant is pushed the
land is weakened because there
is nothing given it, to sustain its
strength. This is the view of
one who is not a farmer, or a
chemist, but who believes he
has sense enough to think for
himself, according to others the
same privilege. We believe it
harmful to every interest for
cotton seed to be sold, and until
convinced to the contrary we
will continue to so believe, and
we will keep on preaching this
doctrine, hoping to have some
infiuence in arresting the evil.
Some of our best friends have
money invested in these institu
tions, and are vei-y much delight
ed with the 60 and 80 per cent
dividends on the stock; if
we were not sincerely convinced
that these enormous profits are
the beginnmng of a coming ruin,
if not checked, we would rejoice
with our friends in their fast ac
cumulating wealth, but they are
killing the goose that laid the
golden egg, and the cup of joy
from which they are now so
hilariously drinking, will turn to
worm-wood and gall and they
will be forced to drink to the
dregs from a cup of ruin.
The farmer in this country is
the country's hope, its prop, and
its stay, put obstacles in his way,
and the progress of the country
is hindered, discourage him, and
the prop is jarred, cripple him,
by robbing him of his honest
toil, and the stay is removed and
a crash will result.
We agree with Russell Sage
the aged financier who says:
"Th combinations of all great
industries will inevitably result
in one of the greatest financial
crashes ever seen in the United
States and that, too, at no very
distant period." He further
says "Combinations of all great
industries are a menace to the
government. Such combinations
are not only a menace but are
the oppressors of the people."
Russell Sage is a multi-million
aire and notorious for his stingi
ness, about 80'years old, and re
garded the keenest financial
mind in this country. He sees
the dire consequences of this
mad race for wealth, and says
so. It is a simple proposition;
if by these combinations, or as
sociations, wealth is to be con
centrated into the hands of a
few, does it not follow that this
wealth must be made out of the
many? Then who are the many,
if not the farmers? The men
with money are organizing their
wealth every day, not abroad
alone, but at our very doors.
The organizers at home tell us
they are associating themselves
together to keep us from being
robbed by the Yankee, but most
of us see no difference in the
practical effect of being robbed
by a Yankee or one of our own
people. The only way to solve
the problem is counter organi
zation-the farmer must organ
ize, and stand by his pledges.
He must make up his mind to
resist the encroachments of the
associations of wealth, or fall
down before the great Jugger
naut and be crushed. There
should be meetings in every
townships, and every farmer
should attend them, sign an iron
clad oath that he will not sell his
seed nor rent land to a tenant
who will sell his seed. If this
is done, the , associations of
cotton seed Al. mills will come
to a stand still, and the farmer
will be relieved of one of the
evils which is sapping the life
from .,his land, and the results
of his toil.
It is not to our financial inter
ests to write these articles, they
have cost us many, many dol
lars already, and will probably
cost us more, but time will con
firm all we have ever written,
and the people will realize it.
As long as we profess to edit a
county newspaper do we expect
to be a sentiment-moulder, and
to do so, we must speak out
truthfully without fear or favor.
This paper will sound the warn
ings of danger, whenever we
believe the people are endanger
ed. If by reason of our standing
by the people looking after their
interests., some of the business
elements will not patronize us
with their advertising, sooner or
later the people will discover it,
and they too, will only patronize
those who are willing to sustain
the paper which has proven
itself the people's friend.
How's This?
we offer One Hundred Dollars Reward for
any case of Catarrh that cannot be cured by
Hallrs Catarrh Cure.
F. J. CHENEY & CO., Props., Toledo. 0.
We, the undersigned, have known F. J. Cheney
for the last 15 years. and believe him perfectly
honorable in all business transactions and finan
cially able to carry out any obligations made by
EST & TRUAX, wholesale druggists, Toledo, 0.
WALDNG, KrneANs & MARviN, wholesale drug
Halls Ctarho Cure is taken internally, acting
directly upon the blood and mucous surfaces of
the system. Price 75c. per bottle. Sold by all
druggists. Testimonials free.
Hall's Family Pills are the best.
General Fitzhugh Lee has
been chosen president of the
Jamestown Exposition, a greater
mistake the company could not
have made. Expositions are
business institutions and when
ever politicians and men who
have never had any practical
business training get in authori
ty over a business concern, the
thing might as well go into the
ands of a Receiver because it
will eventually land there.
Water Cure for Chronic Constipation.
Take two cups of hot water half an
hour before each meal and just before
going to bed, also a drink of water, hot
>r cold, about two hours after each
meal. Take lots of outdoor exercise
walk, ride, drive. Make a regular
habit of this and in many cases chronic.
:onstipation inay be cured without the:
use of any medicine. When a purga
tive is required take something mild
and gentle like Chamberlain's Stamach
and Liver Tablets. For sale by The
R B. Loryea Drug Store Isaac M. Lor
yea, Prop.
Governor-elect Heyward has
started out in his official career,
by showing excellent wisdom in
the appointment of his private
secretary. Mr. J. E. Norment,
the gentleman to whom this hun
or has been tendered, we have
known all of his life. He is first
of all a gentleman. He is a man
of fine ability, and in our opin
ion especially fitted to be the
confidential aid to a statesman,1
whose aspirations are to build
up his country and to govern
his people with an even hand.
Mr. Norment's selection for this
very important position is not
only a recognition of merit, but
it is also a strong indication that
Governor Heyward is a man]
with good judgment. We con
gratulate Mr. Normenti for the
honor conferred upon him and
ongratulate Governor Heyward1
in being so fortunate to secure
the services of a gentleman so
well qualified.
A Certain Cure for Dysentery and Diarrhoea.
"Some years ago I was one of a party]
that intended making a long bicycle 1
trip," says F. L. Taylor, of New Alba-3
ny, Bradford County, Pa. "I was taken
uddenly with diarrhoea, and was about
to give up the trip, when editor Ward,
of the Laceyville Messenger, suggested
that I take a dose of Chamberlain's
Colic, Cholera and Diarrhoea Remedy. 1
I purchased a bottle and took two doses,
one before starting anid one on the
route. I made the trip successfully 1
nd never felt any ill effect. Again<
est summer I was almost completely
run down with an attack of dysentery
I bought a bottle of this same remedy
and this time one dose cured me." Sold I
by The R. B. Loryea Drug Store, Isaac i
M. Torea Prop.
The nomination of D. Clinch
Heyward for Governor of South
Carolina is proof conclusive that
factionalism is a thing of the
past, so far as the people are
concerned, and really it only ex
ists with a few unscrupulous
politicians whose existence de
pends upon strife and bitterness,
hypocrisy and foul methods.
We supported Captain Heyward
because we knew him to be a
gentleman, fully qualified for the
exalted position, and when some
in this county tried to poison
the minds of voters against him
by circulating a contemptible
falsehood, that he voted for Has
kell, weltook it upon ourself to
secure the services of a man at
our own expense and run the lie
down. We are truly glad Hey
ward is elected. and in order
that he may not be deceived we
propose putting him in possess
ion of the information, that he
may know the crew who were
doing their utmost to stab him
in the back with falsehood. We
do this for his own protection,
lest this gang make it appear to
him they were his friends.
Those who opposed him fairly
we have no complaint to make
against, but those who tried to
defeat him with slander must
not offer before him, because he
will have them spotted and the
information will come from us
backed with proof. This is
given out as an open notice, that
hypocrites must not apply.
Cures Blood Poison, cancers, Ulcers, Ec
zema, Etc. Treatment Free.
If you have offensive pimples or erup
tions, ulcers on any part of the body,
aching bones or joints, falling hair,
mucous patches, swollen glands, sore
Lips, eating, -festering sores, sharp,
guawing pains, then you suffer from
serious blood poison or the beginnings
of a deadly cancer. It is a dangerous
condition, but you may be permanently
cured by taking Botanic Blood Balm
(B. B. B.) made especially to cure the
worst blood diseases. It heals every
sore or ulcer, stops all aches and pains
and reduces all swellings. Botanic
Blood Balm cures all malignant blood
troubles, such as eczema, scabs and
scales, pimples, running sores, carbun
cles, scrofula, etc. Especially advised
for all abstinate cases that have reach
ed the second or third stage, Druggists
R1. Trial treatment free by writing
Dr. Gillam, Atlanta, Ga. Describe
trouble and free medical advice given.
Medicine sent at once prepaid. For
sale at The R. B. Loryea Drug Store.
Notwithstanding the frauds
unearthed in Charleston. in the
first primary, the second primary
in that city was rotten with fraud;
men went from precinct to pre
einct and voted numbers of
times, - fictictious names w'ere
used, and in some instances the
names of real voters were used by
vsters and the real voter was re
fused the privilege of-voting be
3ause his name was checked off by
some repeater voting his name
ahead of him. It is to be hoped
that the State convention at its
next meeting, which will be two
years hence, will at least take
some step towards putting a
stop to such flagrant fraud.
Unless it is done, the primary
system will become so that an
honest man cannot afford to go
into it, and the country will be
turned over to the corruptionists
and boodlers. When that is the
ase, the stealing in the days of
radicalism will not compare to
what will be done then, because.
if men buy themselves into posi
tion the money spent must come
back to them with heavy profit,
a.nd the people will be the suf
terers. The methods employed in
Charleston alone is sufficient da
ba for the people throughout the
State to take a hand, in driving
>ut of the party every chance for
the rottenness to be repeated.
Charleston was not the only
ounty where flagrant fraud was
perpetrated, but the methods
here was exposed by the county
xecutive committee, and a citi
ens meeting. In some other
ounties equally as much rotten
ess existed-more votes cast
han there are voters, liberal
ase of money and whiskey and
nany other devices calculated to
ake decent men shrink from
articipating in an institution
chere sugh methods are permit
Wanted-Five young men from Clar
mdon County at once to prepare for
?ositions in the Government Service
ailway Mail Clerks, Letter Carriers,
ustom~ House and Departmental
3erks, etc. Apply to Inter-State Cor
srs. Inst., Cedar Rapids, Ia. [52-8t
A Card of Explanation.
New Zion, S. C., Sept. 15, 1902.
As there is a great deal being said
~oncerning an article that appeared in
LHE MANNING TIMES of Sept. 3, con
~erning a statement that Mr. G. T.
orsham had made to me. In justice
o myself I think it my duty to let the
ublic know just what did occur be
ween myself and Mr. Worsham.
On the night of August 28, 1902, I
net Mr. Worsham on the road and he
old me the negroes were working for
ppelt, and that Appelt had introduced
Sbill in the Senate to givc the negroes
he right to vote in the municipal elec
ion, and that the bill had always been
cept smuggled and had never been
rinted, but Hon. M. C. Galluchat told
iim that he had a copy of the bill that
could see for myself, and that it had
aken the State Librarian two days to
nd it, but she found it.
Mr.Worsham said it was very strange
,hat four years ago Capt. Thomas Wil
on was fighting Appelt, and just as
oon as Appelt went to the Senate Cap
ain Wilson made him a present of a
rold watch, and then said to me, you
nay know that that meant something.
Nhat Mr. Worsham wanted me to be
ieve was, that Appelt had gone to the
epublican party and was working for
he negroes, and that he sold his vote
n the Senate to Captain Wilson for a
rold watch. Mr. Worsham did not say
Eo, but anybody with sense enough to
ret in doors when it rains would know
ust what he meant.
M~r. Worsham said that there was
>eing whiskey used at the New Town
recinct on election day, and that he
'Tould not say that Appelt had it there,
>ut he did believe that Thomas Wilson
tid have it there for Appelt's crowd.
I have no ill-will for Mr. Worsham
mnd am not unfriendly to him, but when
t comes to my word and the truth, I
nust and will~ protect it regardless of
he feelings of any man without fear or
or -.T E SMILEY.
Salem Aroused.
The Citizens of the New Zion section
held a mass meeting last Saturday at
the A. 0. Hudson place, Mr. W. D.
Gamble was made chairman, and Mr.
Roland secretary. A committee of
twelve was appointed to investigzateand
obtain evidence upon which to base a
warrant of arrest for the party or par
ties implicated in the burning of Mr.
A. O. Hudson's house. The people of
that section are very much wrought up
over the affair and strong suspicion
points to a certain individual, but just
what evidence can be procured is not
known. It is probable that an arrest
will be made in a few days. We have
been unable to learn the cause of Mr.
Hudson's troubles, but it is evident
that he has a secret enemy who is de
termined he shall not live in the com
munity, and it does seem to us, the
people of New Zion, who we know to be
a brave and honorable people, will not
stop until they run down the perpetra
tor of this crime. It is a reflection
upon the good name of the community
to have lurking about a fiend whose
hatred for a fellow man is so intense
that he must resort to the hellish and
cowardly tactics of an incendiary. We 1
are opposed to lynch law and would do
all in our power to prevent it, but if
lynch law is ever excusable it is for the
lynching of a scoundrel who fires
another's house.
People of New Zion run down this
fiend, if necessary employ detectives,
call -upon the governor to offer a re
ward. Offer a reward yourself, and
this newspaper will contribute towards
the fund. No fire fiend should be al
lowed to breath the same atmosphere
with honest people.
A Communication.
Mr. Editor-Allow me to speak a few 1
words in favor of Chamberlain's Cough
Remedy. I suffered for three years
with the bronchitis and could not sleep
at nights. I tried several doctors and
various patent medicines, but could get
nothing to give me any relief until my
wife got a bottle of this valuable medi
cine, which has completely relieved
me-W. S. Brockman, Bagneli, Mo.
This remedy is for sale by The R. B.
Loryea Drug Store, Isaac M. Loryea, t
Prop.
Our Market in Danger. c
Duty to our readers and our patrons t
generally whether they be merchants
or farmers, compells us to keep a close
watch on our market, and see to it that t
it does not go backward without our
letting the people know it. The people
know the market fluctuates, but
they also know that no matter how the
fluctuation goes, it does not change the
relative market value. The difference
between this market and Sumter, s
owing to freight rates is as we have
heretofore said about ;, and our far
mers are willing to concede it, but I
when it comes to a matter of t to i
they are not willing to submit and as a
result the cotton is carried on to s
Sumter.
When this market opened, the buy
ers pushed the market to the top notch,
and there was no complaint, we were
so pleased with the disposition to treat
the farmer justly that we urged our
readers to bring their cotton here, and
we want to continue urging our far- j
mers to bring their product to this
market, but unless there is something
done on the part of our merchants to
force the buyers to pay full value for -
the cotton, as a matter of honest duty
to our readers we will not advise them
to come here. Here *is an incident,
related to us by a farmer, if correct, is
very damaging to our market. He
told us that he asked a buyer for the
price of cotton, and the buyer said "my
limit is 8* and it is the very best I can
give you," a little later he heard the
buyer talking on the telephone to an
outof-town merchant, and the buyer
said "my limit is 3-16." This farmer
said "now to me a farmer, his limit was
8, and to a merchant it was 8 3-16, this.
is not fair nor is it honest, and I shall
take my cotton to Sumter where the
buyers and merchants do not stand in
with one another". The farmer re
ferred to, is a man who runs a ginnery
and is in position to advise a good many t
people, and to do us much injury.
Cannot our business men see how
throat-cutting this is to their interests?
[t is indeed painful to us to have to
make an exposure like this, but we do ~
it because we believe the only way to
correct an evil, is to expose it, and we
propose keeping up this kind of a fight t
if every business house in the town feels
ffended at us.
It was through agitation in these col
umns and our personal appeals that we
induced one gentleman to enter the cot
on market, that party created an
activity from the start, and whenever
die is in the market we hear no com
plaints, but just as soon as he is away
>r out, there seems to be a drag.
The farmers do not like the custom
f buyers not buying direct from them,
nd they are not to be fooled, they i
know full well the buyers will not bid
is high as the merchant, and the mer
3hant buys, then at the close of the
ay the buyer gives the merchant
he full market and takes the cotton. g
o town can ever hope to build a mar- a
~et on such 2ines, it is enough profit ~
or the merchant to collect for the
~oods he sold in the summer at lien
rices, he should be satisfied with that,
nd not be so gluttonous, to want to a
nake a profit out of the cotton too.
- ti
Take Care of the Stomach. a
The man or woman whose digestion a
is perfect and whose stomach performs c
its every function is never sick. Kodol t<
lenses," purifies and sweetens the d
stomach and cures positively and per- n
manently all stomach troubles, indiges- v
ion and dyspepsia. It is the wonderlul
reconstructive tonic that is making so c
many sick people well and weak people p
strong by conveying to their bodies all il
f the noureshment in the food they n
at. Rev. J. H. Holladay, of Holladay, v
~Iiss., writes: Kodol has cured me. I i
3onsider it the best remedy I ever used v
or dyspepsia and stomach troubles. I C
sas given up by physicians. Kodol 1:
aved my life. Take it after meals. C
rhe R. B. Loryea Drug Store. 1
thWvInshst comewro
somewhere.
The springs of red blood are
ound in the soft core of the t,
bones called the marrow and
some say red blood also comes d
from the spleen. Healthy bone
a
?arrowv and healthy spleen s
ire full of fat.
Scott's Emulsion makes new c
blood by feeding the bone r
marrow and the spleen with a
the richest of all fats, the pure
cod liver oil.
For pale school girls and ,
nvalids and for all w~hose
blood is thin and pale, Scott's ~
5
Emulsion is a pleasant and rich fi
lood food. It not only feeds ~
"
the blood-making organs but p
gives them strength to do ~
t~heir proper work. f
Send for free sa-u.ple. s1
SCOTT & BOWNE, Chemists,
10as1 Pearl street, New York.
"Quail
Changing Conditioi
All of this has been talk
ige on the great markets of ti
)f momentous importance to th
hings this store contains.
swo+o+Oo +oo+o+o+o+oC+o+
Notions.
This department contains more
,rticles-more of the 1 i t t 1 e
hings required in every house
cold, more of the better class
he reliable grades of Notions
han is usually seen in a single
store.
Silks.
What a wonderful array of
)eauty they represent. Novel
ies in the most elaborate pat
erns-neat designs that are se
ate and effective-plain colors'
hat are plainly plain. All fresh
'rom the best foreign and domes
ic looms.
Silk Waist.
Why should a woman make a
ilk waist when she has such a'
ollection as we show to select
rom? They are the smartest, I
reshest that the cleverest de
igners have made. They are
martly underpriced.
[he Sum
A Strong Denial.
Manning, S. C., Sept. 12, 1902.
o the people of Clarendon:
I was compelled to go to Sumter yes
~rday on private business, and could
t attend the meeting of the executive
ymmittee. I employed M. C. Gallut
at, Esq., to represent me at the comn
iittee for the purpose of getting the
ymmittee to compare the polling lists
ascertain whether or not there was
y "repeating" in the election held on1
e 9th, inst., not for the purpose of
rotesting the election, but for the pur-]
ose of prosecuting those who had
repeated" if any such were discover-i
.. The enormous vote as reported by
e managers made me feel that there
ras something wrong. I spoke to Mr.
~ppelt about the matter and told him 1
'hat I proposed to do, and he advised
e not to bother with it. and said in
s opinion "it would amount to noth
On returning to Manning last night
was informed that it was being cir
ilated that I was acting as a "eats
w" for Mr. Appelt. and in justice to
aat gentleman, and to myself, I de
unce any such intimation as a bald
ced lie. Mr. Appelt advised me
gainst the action I took, and it was1
oly after I insisted,that he drafted the
>mmunication sent to the committee.
also wish to state that I never for a
ioment doubted the count of the man
ers. I believed they counted the I
tes correctl'y, but I had good reasons
believe there was "repeating" done
d believe so yet, because there was
bout 1800 votes reported and in every
lub numbers of voters did not go out
the polls at all, which shows Claren
m to have over 2000 voters, and I do
ot believe there are that many legal
ters in the county.
From the information I received, the
mmittee did not make a proper comn
arison of .the club polling lists to seej
men voted more than once. I did
ot ask for a recount; what I wanted,
'as simply a search made to ascertain
a man vcoted at one club and then
ent to another and voted. I want the
unty Chairman to comply with the
w and file these pollings lists with the
lerk of the Court, where I can at mny
sure make the comparison, or for anyj
ne else to do so if they wish. I am
ot kicking over the result of the elec-I
Lon but as a citizen I have the right toI
oo whether or not there was frauds
>mmitted. Had double voting been
iscovered I would not have enter-ed a
rotest, but would have, and will yet
idit any man who was mean enough
vote nmore than once.
Respectfully,
H. L. JOHNSTON.
A Boy's Wild Ride For Life.
With family around expecting him
die, and a son riding for life. I8 miles
>get Dr. King's Newv Discovery for
snsumpt.ion, Coughs and Colds. W. H.
Irown, of Leesville, Id., endured
eath's agonies from asthma. but this
'onderful medicine gave instant relief
nd soon cured him. He writes: "'I uow
.eep soundly every night." Like mar
elous cures of Consumition. Pneu
ionia, Bronchitis, Coughs, Colds and
*rip prove its matchloss mert for all
hroat and Lung troubles. Guaranteed
ttles 0c and $1.00. Trial bot tles free
The R. B. Loryea Drug Store.
A Card.
Davis Station, S. C. Sept. 13. 1902.
o the voters of Clarendon County:
Please allow me to extend my many
ianks to those of you who so heartily
ipported me in my race for the Senate
om this County. I am very grateful
ideed for the honor conferred upon
C, and as I promised during the camn
iign. if elected, to serve the p~eople
~ithfully and sincerely. I. reiterate
iat pledge, and shall use the best ef
irts of my life to merit the honor be
owed upon me.
Very respectfully.
C. M DAvIS
ty the Max
Price the Minimum."
is, Changing the Prices, Changing Everythi
Rebuilding, Restocking and Reorganizing.
ing place in this store, and now we stand boldly in the fron
1e East, surpassed by no house in the State. It presages a r
e smart shoppers of this vicinity, as evidenced by the mentio
MILLINERY.
New Felt Hats-they're new as can be-these Felt Hats for
women's autumn wear, and are by far the most stylish creations
shown this year. There is a greatly varied assortment of them
now on display in the millinery room. It is useless to attempt de
scriptions. You must see them to appreciate their unusual style.
Ready to Wear.
In this great Ready to Wear department of ours where the
newest fall productions are daily arriving, you can find the gar
ment of your choice, and you can rely on it being correctly tail
>red of the best materials, and, too, each and every garment is
marked with a price that will stimulate the cozy corners of your
purse.
SHOES.
Your happiness, health and appearance depend greatly on
our shoes. The Shoes we sell are made to fit the feet. If you
;vear shoes bought here your feet will be comfortable and attrac
tive. Our prices in this department are unmatchable.
TRIMMINGS.
Generous stocks of every fashionable and wanted sort of Dress
Trimmings are here. They are fresh from Paris, and represent
he best of the Frenchman's charming conceits for the modiste's
nanipulation in gowning fair women.
p+0+0+0+*+*+0+0+0+0+0+0+0+0+0+0+0+0*+*+o+*+e+O+C*+C
iter Dry Goo
8LJMTERF S. C.
A Truism.
When the undertaker is sent for, he
generally comes to grief.-Phladelphia
Record. __ _ _d
A Parson's Noble Act.0 K ST
"I want all the world to know,"
,vrites Rev. C. J. Budlong, of Asha
vay, R. I., "what a thoroughly good
nd reliable medicine I found in Elec
ric Bitters. They cured me of jaun
lice and liver troubles that had caused
ne great suffering for many years.
or a genuine, all-around cure they ex
el anything I ever saw." Electric
itters are the surprise of all for their
onderful work in Liver, Kidney and
tomach troubles. Don't fail to try _ _ D 9~
hem. Only 50 cts. Satisfaction is
guaranteed by The R. B. Loryea DrugThgraetinnora
tore._____ilinfmoeinxp
Consoling Thought.fuusoftexprnc
He-Darling. I have lost my position. Whnyuwta
She-Never mind, dear. Think of how
small your salary was.-Brooklyni Life.
=10=GRAN I
[he B. B, Loryea Drug Store
IS THE MOsT POPULAR DRUGgodatpiethtwli
ESTABLISHMENT NORTH Cm n e s
OF CHARLESTON.
L st. EAUSEinform couerotex M a n i
poor. white or colored
2nd. E^ARpte*Wethof RUSn
MEDICINES and CHEMICALS.
)~BECAUSE Our Prescription Depart
.LL*mcnt is conducted on strict Pharma- --
ceutical principles.
tch.h and Skil are exhibited fis.
last and all the time.
-- BECAUSE Night calls are cheerfully.
)u. courteously and promptly responded
to.
ment.
7th.BCUEW r agdd""ets for th
TINEZ PREPARED PAINTS.
Bth. ' SNSetednd Tu
Garden Seed. $eed that will gcrmi
nate. and which secured the medal
for gencral excellence from the Paris
Exposition of 1900.
Bth.:C!AE We ae he agnt for
COMPANY'S Products. We have
many unsolicited testimonials regard
ing their effcacy.
L 0th. BUT hy"ell lahe
aware that THlE R-. B. LORYEA
te IdealDu tor ofceClarendon
County.
FoXr T wenty-eight years THE R. B. LORYEA
)RUG ST1ORIE has met every demand made
nutnd while -mn may ome and men
ke a beacon and shines for all.
ISAAC Ni, LOsYEA, Proprietor, ~VrnaaIn
Sinof the
Golden M'ortar, o etlzr
4 MANNIE, S. C.J~YUWl ESJF
'PHONE NO. 2.
w \u rdrs eceveimmdiae ttetio.ThAreatstON -iveto a
Cleansfulause of thefexperience <
luWhenayougwantha
H~r todItishototmeetiwCohosu
Cures salp ducuscaGurarstocknIof
t~e~aiI-IARD~
S
ng-Recapitalizing,
t with a Price Power and Pres
Lew order of things-a change
ning of a few of the many good
Corsets.
The new lines of Corsets are
fast filling up the shelves. We
are carrying all the best makes.
Made of the best material and
have the best workmanship 'on
each one.
Dress Goods.
In the wide range of Dress
Goods are many beautiful weaves
full of individuality and charac
teristic for -their strength and
the foundation of their excel
ence. lFashion has scattered
rays of inspiration in every nook
and corner of this Department.
Hosiery.
The Stockings we sell are built
to wear-and the fact that they
do wear longer than the ordinary
stocking is proof of their value.
ds Co.
ciEVS.
A Carload
of Stoves.
d electrician has lost more than a
riments. It is a well-known fact
success has been made by the ski!
>f others.
STOVE
ccess in getting the best, do as Edi
~rience of others and you wll buy a
0. K. STOVE,
e once been used they have always.
ell and guarantee them for their
in the county. We are selling the
aduce you to buy.
ardware Co.
tEAT!
RTILJZERS
By
Chemical Compun,
nufacture~
i on Earth"
CHlNEAL CWNf
ATLAMTAg

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