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The times-news. [volume] (Hendersonville, N.C.) 1927-current, April 07, 1933, Image 1

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WEATHER
Fair and coaler tonight; fair
with rising temperatures Satur
day.
GOOD AFTERNOOH
The box-score for Germany thus
far seems to be: a million hum,
one Hitler, and a long string of
errors.
VOL. 52—No. 83
HENDERSONVILLE, N. C., FRIDAY, APRIL 7, 1933
SINGLE COPIES, FIVE CENTS
V V V
.v. sr. y.
•Y- Y*
H' Y Y
* * *
* *
¥ ¥ *t* C* * • .WW
British-Russian Breach Is Moving Nearer
GESTURE MADE
TO AFFECT U. S.
SOVIET HOLDS
Spokesman Claims Britain
Seeks to Prevent Ac
cord of Countries
COMMONS ADOPTS
BRITISH EMBARGO
LONDON. April 7.—(IT).—
Confident that the threat of an J
economic boycott will have some ^
cffect on the Soviet government,
the British cabinet was represent
ed todav as feeling it had done j
everything possible for the six ,
British subjects to be tried in
Moscow next Monday on charge-;
of sabotage until after the revo
lutionary tribunal reaches a ver
dict.
SOVIET SEES AN
ULTERIOR MOTIVE
MOSCOW. April 7.—(UP).—
One of the chief motives behind J
England's exceptionally strong i
protests against the arrest of six '
of hor citizens in Russia is the de
sire to prevent American recogni
tion i»f the Soviet, a Soviet spokes,
man charged today. He <aid Brit
ish conservatives are hopeful that
Washington would hesitate to as
sume relations with the Soviet th-»
moment when London threatened
to limit its relations with the So
viet government.
EMBARGO BILL
PASSED IN COMMONS
LONDON*. April 7.— (I'P).—A
break in diplomatic relations be
tween Grraf Britain anil Soviet
Russia wa- believed n°arer today
after the house of commons hau
passed on third readintr of the en
abling act to allow the govern
ment to declare an embargo
against Russian good*.
The enabling act v.-as passed at
the third reading, 2(»1 t<» 41. and
«ent to the house of lords wherv
it was cxpected to pass all >tagcs
next Tuesday.
The reading of the measure
aroused only listless debate com
pared wi'h earlier dramatic dis
cussions of the legislation, crow
ing out of the controversy which
has arisen following the arrest ofi
six British representatives of
Metronolitan-Vickcrs. Ltd.. an
electrical company, in Moscow, on
charges of sabo'age and espion
age.
Queries in commons were con
cerned chiefly with whether th«>
government intended to use the
power for anv other purpose than
in behalf of the six men held in
Moscow.
Walter Hunciman, chairman of
the board of trade, denied that
the government had any ulterior
motives and promised that the ex-1
traordinary powers to be granted
under the enabling act would not
be utilized otherwise.
SPECIAL SERIES OF
TALKS AT ST. JAMES
Friday night between X and D
o'clock, the Rev. James I*. Burke i
is rrivinjr a series of instructional J
talks on various phases of church .
life, which are open not only to J
church members, but to all inter-!
ested. The series of topics which,
is being discussed at this time in
cludes: The Church, the Body of
Christ ;_'hc Church in History; the1
Faith of the Church; the Worship
of the Church: the Church's Li
brary—the Holy Scripture; the
Sacraments of the Church; the
Ministry of the Church. The se
ries continues until the first of
May.
FIRST BAPTIST S. S.
MEETING TONIGHT
The Sunday school meeting of
the First Baptist church for April
has been called for tonijjht by Su
perintendent W. B. Sinclair. The
meetinjr will be held at 8 o'clock
in the Hollowell Bible class room.
ORCHESTRA AT THEATER
A program by Jimmie Livinjr-j
stones orchestra >» announced as
»n added feature to the motion
picture attractions at the Caro
lina theater tonight. The orches
tra will appear at 9 o'clock, and
immediately following this pro
gram will play for a Henderson
ville Golf and Country club dance
at the Skyland hotel.
TUGWELL CONFIRMED
WASHINGTON. April 7. (UP) j
The senate yesterday confirmed
the nominations of Rexford G.
Tugwell of New York to be assis-i
tant secretary of agriculture and
William Lane Austin, of Missis
sippi. to be director of the census1
bureau. '
HOUSE BILL FIXES
SALUDA MAYORALTY
TERM FOR 4 YEARS
KALKIGH. April 7.—A Mil l>y
Representative Massonburtr, I'olk,
to fix the term of office of the I
mayor and city commissioners of
Saluda, was passed by the house I
yesterday and sent to the scnat?.
The bill provides that at the I
next election of the officials in i
Si*! it da there shall be elected four
commissioners and two of these
so elected shall hold olfico for the
term of four years and the other
two hall hold office for two years. i
Two commissioners are to he
••lifted at each term of election
for a period of four years.
The bill further provides that
at the next election the mayor of
Saluda shall be elected for a term
of four years and that thereafter j
the mayor shall be elected for a !
term of four years.
The bill also provides that the |
commissioners shall be empow- i
ered to fix the salary of the may
or of Saluda.
Two Automobile Accidents
Lead to Court
Action
I>aniage suits aggrega'ing
r,00 have been filed in the office •
of the clerk of the superior court |
as a result «>f accidents occurring 1
s»nce the first of the vca>\
Mr. and Mrs. Sam Lubow are!
named defendants in two suits, j
file<l by Gus Summey and George j
Robinson, colored, as a result of;
an accident on Justice street on
January 24 in which a horso and i
buggv driven by Summey was |
struck bv an automobile driven!
by Mrs. Lubow.
The plaintiffs in these cases al-j
lege that about 7 p. m. on that j
date Summey was driving v horse.
and buggy on Justice street, thaN
the buggy was on the right side
of the street, that a lantern was
disnlayed on the vehicle, and that
Robinson, who walked behind the
buggy, also carried a lantern.
The plaintiffs further allege
that Robinson was leading several
hunting dogs, that several of
these dogs weh; killed or injured,
that the horse was injured ami
the buggy demolished, and that
both plaintiffs were injured.
Summey asks damages in the
amount of $.1,000 and Robinson
in the amount of $2,500.
In the other two suits, Everett
E. Brock is named defendant by
G. F. Jones and Henry McMinn,
and it is alleged that a car driven
by McMinn and occupied by Jones
was struck by a car driven by
Brock on the west side of Osceola
Lake, that the car was turned
over and came to rest in the
water.
It is alleged that Brock was
driving at a fast rate of speed
and that there were no lights on
his car, that the car driven by
McMinn had come to :i stop on
the side of the road at the ap
proach of the Brock car. Botii
defendants seek damages in the
amount of $10,000 each. i
FIRST CAPITAL
BEER GOES TO
WHITE HOUSE
Roosevelt Will Send It to
Press Club With His
Compliments
TENNESSEY HOUSE
PASSES BEER BILL
WASHINGTON, April 7. ( UP).
The bo.-^s of the Abner l>rury
brewery stopped out on the ship
ping platform at 12:01 a. m. to
day and shout to a truck ilriver:
"The White House. Let her
go!"
The motor roared and the first
shipment of beer to be delivered
in Washington started for the ex
ecutive mansion. It arrived with
the help of four motorcycle po
licemen and the United States
marine corps.
Pennsylvania avenue was chock
ed with traffic, but automobiles
readily jrot out of the way for
the big white truck that bore the
sign:
"President Koosevell, the first
beer is for you.''
A marine was riding on top of
the truck just to make things of
ficial.
The beer truck stopped in the
narrow street between the White
House and state department. It
was followed by another truck
loaded with beer destined for a
(Continued on page 3.)
Beer is Legal in
19 States Today
(UNITED PRESS)
Nineteen states and the District
of Columbia had .'5.2 beer today
af'er l.'J years of prohibition.
Lively but orderly celebrations
were reported in New York, Chi
cago, Washington. St. Louis, Mil
waukee and San Francisco.
In seven more states legislative
arrangements have been made to
place beer on sale within a few
weeks.
Several such cities, lacking state
regulatory measures, pushed thru
temporary licensing measures.
The states in which legal beer
is being sold today are Missouri,
Kentucky, Ohio, Maryland, Wash
ington. Oregon, Colorado, Mon
tana. California, Nevada Illinois,
Arizona. Indiana, Wisconsin, Min
nesota, New York. New Jersey,
Pennsylvania and Rhode Island.
The District of Columbia likewise
has legal beer.
The dates on which other states
will begin drinking legal beer are
Vermont, May 1; West Virginia.,
May 10: North Carolina, May 1;
Louisiana, April l.'J: Connecticut,
April 25, and Wyoming, May IS.
The Massachusetts state legisla
ture was in session Wednesday
night attempting to push through
a beer bill in order that the state
might have legal brew at the ear
liest possible moment.
All the other 22 states are with
out beer legislation. In several of
these states test cases, involving
the legality of beer sales, were
pending.
AGRICULTURAL AND MINING
BELTS CHEERED BY STEADY
STRENGTH OF COMMODITIES
NEW YORK, April 7.—(UP).,
More checr swept over the agri
cultural and mining belts of the
nation yesterday as commodity
markets kept ui> their tremendous
displays of strength.
Millions were added to the
value of crops and stock on hand
and potential millions were ex
changed in furi vs sessions on;
the various commodity markets j
of the country. The wheat ex
changed yesterday was enormous.
Various brokers expected the
volume to be the highest in sev
eral months—millions of bushels
••hanging hands — although the;
Chicago board of trade question- j
ed whether the day would be the j
largest of the year.
Based on mean prices of three j
future deliveries in wheat, corn (
and oats, plus preliminary esti- •
mates of what the rate of trad-J
ing might have been yesterday,!
approximately $34,426,250 was]
represented in the trades on those
three commodities on the Chicago
board of trade. Actual figures
of the trading, however, were on
marginal basis.
Meanwhile cash prices were
bounding. Wheat which the farm-1
iC •• 2 * vi
or sells at his own back door was
quoted at 63 rents a bushel for
the finest grade. Corn was at 35
cents a bushel as against 21 3-4
and 23 cents on March 3 while
oats was at 22 3-4 cents, equal
ing the outside figure of last
July.
But the farmers were not sell
ing. There were few bids ask~d
from the famine region. Chi
cago's outgoing delivery was esti
mated at 25,000 bushels with
only 1800 bushels reported in
coming.
Rye lost some of its spcctacu
larity during the day. There had
been reports that a big eastern
operator, one who is as familiar
with the New York board of trade
as the various grain centers, had
taken tremendous long positions
in a 'soueeze" maneuver. Wed
nesday's prices skyrocketed but
yesterday they slumped off.
Generally, however, commodity
prices soared. The United Press
daily commodity index stood at
74.40 for 30 commodities, a new
high. Wheat, corn, oats, lard,
butter, flour, cotton, sugar, silver
and lin advanced. Three com
modities were lower and 17 un
changed.
SOUTHERN PINES IN
BID FOR SEVERAL
HOLLYWOOD STUDIOS
SOUTHERN PINKS, Apr. 7.—
; (UP). — The Southern Pines
I Chamber of Commerce has stort
i (.'(I an extensive campaign to briiiK
j several motion picturc studios
! from Hollywood. Calif., to the
j Sandhills Resort section here,
stressing the local climae and
I nearness to New York. The cham
1 ber officials have learned that
banking interests are encouratrintf
producers to move locations from
j the western seaboard.
ALLEGATIONS
IN SC0TTSB0R0
CASE A 'HOAX'
Ruby Bates Repudiates Her
Testimony at First Trial
of Nine Negroes
DKCATUR, Ala.. April 7.—I
(III')—Dramatically appearing as)
a surprise defense witness, Missi
Kuby Hates of Iluntsvillc, Ala.,
yesterday completely repudiated i
her charges against nine negro
youths in the internationally fa
mous Scottsboro case, and refut-j
e<l the testimony of Mrs. Victoria
Price, her co-complainant.
Her entire previous testimony)
in the case, now bring retired |
here in an atmosphere of tension
caused by vague threats of vio- j
lence, was a hoax, Miss Bat,es
said. She added that if M.t*.
was si^»jectan to mistreatment,
she knew nothing of i'..
The testimony of the long-miss
ing girl was a diroct right-about
face from the story she told when
the state won death sentences for j
seven of the nine accused negroes, j
It came as a l.~:r.bshell, a distinct!
surprise, as the defence had rest
ed its direct presentation.
Miss Bates arrived in court in |
company of Mrs. May Jones, so
cial worker for the Independent
Presbyterian church, Birmingham,
Ala., and was immediately called
to the witness chair by Samuel
Liebowitz, chief defense counsel. |
Mrs. Price flushed.
I'jariy in ner ii'suiiiun.v, mi.-.- >
Bates revealed thnt until two
weeks ago she was in New York, j
where she conferred with Dr.
Marry Emerson Fosdick, widely-l
known pastor, to whom, she said, j
she confessed to perpetrating a(
hoax. Dr. Fosdick arranged for
her return, she said.
She came to Birmingham, she
said, and cot in touch with Dr. j
Charles Clingman, pastor of thej
Episcopal Church of the Advent,
through whom she met Mrs. Jones;
and at whose request she was I
brought to the court yesterday.
In a previous trial Mis Bates]
testified and directly accused the
nine negroes of mistreating her
and Mrs. Price on a freight train
while they were "hoboing" their
way from Chattanooga, Tenn., to
Scottsboro. There was a fight on
the train between the group of
negroes, and some white hoys
with whom the two women were
riding. The white boys, according
to the trial record, were thrown
from the train by the larger ne
gro group, members of which then
allpfjedly mistreated the white
erirls. Word of the incident was
flashed ahead by the ejected white
boys, and arrest of the negroes
occurred at Scottsboro.
Tho repudiation of Miss Bates
included the admission she and
Mrs. Price were on the train, but
also the assertion that they were
in an entirely different part of the
train from where the two fighting
groups were.
Testimony 01 jviiss i>an-> »><••
the second major defense move of '
the day, the other being the story |
of Lester Carter, a white witness,
who testified he and one Jack
Tiller spent tho nijrht prior to the
Scottsboro incident with Miss
Bates and Mrs. Price in a hobo
camp at Chattanooga.
"We were dissatisfied with
wages in Huntsville, and decided
to go to Chattanooga to look for
work," Carter said. "The four of
us spent two nights in a box car."
Carter testified his association
with Mrs. Price was intimate, at
that time. By his testimony the
defense sought to convince the
jury that Carter, and not the ne
groes. was responsible for a phy
sician's positive report of her con
dition an hour after the alleged
Scottsboro incident.
In her surprise testimony yes
terday, Miss Bates corroborated
the Carter testimony, that she and
Mrs. Price spent the night with
Carter and Tiller at the hobo re
treat. She confessed previously
described intimacies with the two
men, as testified by Carter.
On cross-examination by the
(Continued on page three) '
! Akron's Survivors Fly to
Capita! for Crash Inquiry
Three brave men—all that remain of the 77 who were dashed into
Lhe Atlantic in (he .Akron disaster—arc seen here at Floyd Bennett
Field, Brooklyn, N. V.. iust before boardinr a plane for Washington,
I). ('., t'> give lo the navy's hoard full accounts of the tragedy. Left
•o right: Richard K. Dtal. boatswain's nni'e of Lakehurst, N:. .J., who
■ilso survived tlie Shenandoah crash; Moodv E. Krwin, inctalsmith of
Memphis, Tcnn.; and T.icutcnant Commander Herbert V. Wiley of
Wheeling, Mo., second in command of the Akron.
Churches of City Unite for'
Half Hour Meetings at
Carolina Theatre
Undci the auspices of the City
Ministerial Association a series of
noon services will l>c held at the
Carolina theatre in Holy Week,
the last week before Easter, daily,
beginning Monday, April 10, be
tween the hours of 12 and 1U :.'>0
o'clock.
J. C. Coston, well known as an
evangelistic singer, will lead the
music for these services, and Miss
Elizabeth Cannon, organist of the!
Presbyterian church will be at the |
organ for the series of services, i
The program for I ho week calls i
for the following speakers:
Monday—Dr. L. T. Wilds, pas
tor of the Presbyterian church.
Tuesday—Rev. Jas. P. Burke,
pastor of St. James Episcopal
church.
Wednesday—Rev. A. W. Lip
pard, pastor of Grace Lutheran
church.
Thursday—Rev. !?.• V. Miller, |
pastor of Grove Street Gospel
church.
Friday—Rev. W. If. Ford, pas
tor of First Baptist church.
(Continued on page three)
East Fiat Rock
Contest Benefit
For Firp Dept.
EAST FLAT ROCK, April 7.—
A fiddlers' convention will be
held here a week from tonight,
Friday. April 14, at 7:*J0 o'clock,
at the liiffii school auditorium, the
purpose of which is to rai.;c funds
for the equipment of East Flat
Rock's volunteer fire department.
Cash prizes have been arranged
for successful contestants and
merchandise prizes will be given
by the following merchants and
stores, co-operating for the suc
cess of the contest: Stepp & Walk
er, Hart's Grocery, Sanitary Mar
ket, Miller Drug Store, Hodge's
Service Station and Worley's
Grocery.
Any string band which would
like to enter the contest is asked
to communicate with Miller's
drug store.
Dr. Munden and Family
Will Make Permanent
Residence Here
The R. E. Noble house, a red
brick bungalow siutatcd on the
Kanuga road just outside the city
limits, has been sold to Dr. J. J.
Munden and will be occupied by
Dr. Munden and family. Original
ly from Pittsburgh, they have
been living in St. Petersburg, and
came to Hendersonville because,
as Dr. Munden says, lie regards
this section as having about the
best year-around climate of any
section of the country.
AT-P
NEWS
BEER BOOSTS U. S.
INCOME TEN MILLIONS
WASHINGTON, April 7.—
j (UP). — Government revenues
have been boosted nearly ten
million dollars already by beer
| taxes, although the product has
! been on sale only a few hours,
preliminary estimates showed
today.
I SURVIVORS HEARD
IN AKRON PROBE
WASHINGTON, April 7.—
I CUP)—The congressional com
mitter investiff.-atinj; the loss of
j the U. S. S. Akron, adjourned
I today, having heard testimony
by the three survivors of the
[ fti.int dirigible, lost in the At.
| lanlic early Tuesday morning.
, HITLER, MUSSOLINI
INVITED TO WASHINGTON
WASHINGTON, April 7.—
j (UP).—The state department
j announced today that it had in
vited Premier Mussolini of
' Italy, Chancellor Hitler of Ger
( many and Premier Daladier of
Fiance either to come personal
ly or send their representative*
to Washington to discuss prepa
I ratiocs for a world economic
confcrt ncc.
REPUBLICANS READY
TO SLOW DOWN ACTION
WASHINGTON, April 7.— j
(UP). — Senate Republicans
took issue with Democratic [
speed methods today as the sen- I
ate opened consideration of th>» i
administration's farm relief bill. I
i Senator Fess, Republican, Ohio, j
minority whip, demanded that j
I committee amendmenta be ex- I
| plained fully.
FIVE DAY WEEK
BILL IS PASSED,
Senate Measure To Be
Amended to Win Ap- '
proval of Roosevelt
By THOMAS L. STOKES j
j WASHINGTON, April 7. (UP)J
'The senate acted Thursday to
break the grip of the machine,
i\ge upon America's industrial
workers.
j With some reluctance, it pass
led the Hlack five-day week, six
hour day hill, a revolutionary
economic change designed to
meet the threat of the machine
by spreading jobs. Its sponsors
claimed it will give work to
000,000 now idle, half of the un
employed army.
The vote was 53 to 30.
Forty-one Democrats and J1
Republicans and one Farmer-I.a
borite voted for the bill. Oppos
ing it were 10 Democrats and :J0
Republicans.
Victory for the slight and de
termined Senator Hugo Hlack,
Democrat, Alabama, came after
an uphill struggle during which'
foes of the measure tried unsuc
cessfully to kill it by throttling
it with amendments.
Rlack's major skirmish was won
(Continued on page 3.)
REHABILITATION PROGRAM
OF ROOSEVELT WILL SOON
BE IN FULL FORCE, BELIEF
WASHINGTON, April 7. (UP).
Belief that the end of the Roose
velt rehabilitation program was
in sight, was expressed last night
in administration circles.
The president is making vapid
.strides toward completion of the
remaining major matters he will
submit to the special session of
congress. These includo chicfly
railroad relief and a self-liquidat
ing project, for public works.
He already has obtained action
on banking legislation, beer, un
employment relief and economy.
Somp congressional leaders pro
diet the end of the special session
01. May 15. Others arc not so
optimistic.
Mr. Roosevelt is putting the
finishing touches to development
of the Tennessee River basin
project and operation of Muscle
Shoals. This is one phase of his
public program. He will confer
today with Senator George Nor
n's, Republican, Nebraska, and
other congressional leaders inter
ested in the Shoals.
Recommendations in connec
tion with these projects will in
clude reforestation, soil erosion
prevention, abandonment of un
productive farm lahds. Mr.
, Roosevelt believes that through
sale of timber and additional pow
er generated by expansion of
hydro electric facilities, the cost
of the development will pay for
itself in a few years.
Mr. Roosevelt also was expect
ed to receive for studv today the
report of Secretary of Commerce
Roper on railroad rehabilitation.
It is understood the report will
call for appointment of a corps
of coordinators to carry out a
modified unification plan in an
effort to reduce waste, expendi
tures and provide for a more co
hesivo transportation system.
The railroad program also sug
gest, it was said, that trackage
be abandoned in some instances
and that stringent federal regula
tions be issued for busses and
trucks engaged in interstate com
merce.
Considerable opposition has de
veloped in the last few days to
the rail rehabilitation plan. La
bor, especially, has been hostile
to the eo-ordinator scheme be
cause they professed to see in it
a reduction in the number of
employes and a curtailment of
service which they claim would
react unfavorably on the. smaller
communities of the nation.?
The railroad situation was the
(Continued on page three) 1
CONTROL OVER
GERMAN LIFE
IS EXTENDED
Activities in Industrial and
Cultural Life of Ger
mans Affected
'HEROIC PIETY' IS
TO BE DISSEMINATED
BERLIN, April 7.—
The Hitler government, drove re
lentlessly and efficiently ahead to
day with its campaign to dominate
all fields of German life.
Through its policy of national
coordination, control was extend
ed not only over all government
functions hut over social, busi
ness. economic, religious and cul
tural activities as well.
Probably the most significant
development was the bringing int»
the Nazi fold of the Federation
of German industries, one of the
most powerful organizations in
the country, comproising the
heads of leading industries.
The Lutheran church, which
numbers practically all of the 40,.
000,000 German protestants be
gan a move to adopt the Nazi
principles. It is reported that a
certain faction is advocating th"
establishment of a huge national
radio pulpit, from which the of
ficial pastor will deliver sermons,
replacing a series of small and in
ferior sermons heretofore deliv
ered by local pastors.
Ry PAUL KECSKEMET!
BERLIN, April 7. — (UI'J. —
Chancellor Adolf Hitler yesterday
proclaimed a new campaign » <
eliminate "the excessive number
of Jewish intellectuals" whom h"
feels tend to dominate th" na
tion's intellectual life.
"Germany's claim to intellec
tual leadership by people of h'-r
own blood must bo fulfilled at.
the soonest opportunity by th"
elimination of the excessive num
ber of Jewish intellectuals," tin
chancellor declared in conversa
tion with representatives of medi
cal organizations headed by Prof.
Alfons Stauder.
The chancellor's declaration
followed a report in the newspa
per Taegliche Rundschau of tho
beginning of a Nazi party cam
paign to control the German
Lutheran church.
Complete revision of the con
stitution of the evangelical church
(Lutheran) to enable the gov
ernment to "utilize the ehurc'i
for the education of citizen1?'
was proposed at an all-German
congress of the "German Chris
tians," an organization composed
chiefly of Nazis.
The Lutheran church would bA
utilized for a "reich church" that
would preach "heroic piety,*' it
was said.
The new onurch would no es
sentially racial in character, it
was decided, thus denying church
ceremonies for Germans marry
ing "members of a foreign racc."'
The congress urged that th<:
government precipitate this rrvi
sion through the appointment *»f
reich church commissioners" ».»
the present church bodies proh
ably woul dbe tardy" in effect
ing revision unaided.
As an alternative, n govern
ment decree changing the churr'i
svnods to make them conform to
the political composition of »h<;
state diets was suggested. The
Nazis hold a majority in most
of the state diets.
The Nazi candidates in lln
synod elections of 1932 conduct
ed a widespread propaganda cam .
paign but obtained only one
third of the available seats. The
others went to church organize
tions more or less affiliated wit'i
the nationalist organizations.
In what sea battle d»d"
THE US FLEET COMPLETELY
DESTROY THE ENEMY FLEET
WITHOUT LOSING A MAN?
4
Who were
THE "BOXERS"
9
Which state
IN THE US MAS JWE
GREATEST AJ3£A OF
NATIONAL FORESTS?
For correct answer* to thee!
question*, please turn to page 5

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