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The times-news. [volume] (Hendersonville, N.C.) 1927-current, April 08, 1933, Image 2

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Oh* U4tnea-3spms *
HwiJmi on Till • N*wc EiUbHtUd la 1AM
HeadersonTiQe TifflM EitabliiUd !■ 1U1
Published every afternoon except Sunday at 227
North Main street, HendersonviDo, N ,CM by The
Times-News Co., Inc., Owner and Publisher.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
By Ttanea-Newa Carrier, in HendersonviHe, or else
where, per week 10c
By Mail in Hendersonville, per year $5.00
Due to high postage rates, the subscription price
of The Times-News in Zones above No. 2 will ho
based on the cost of postage.
Entered as Second Class Matter at the Post Office
!n HendersonviHe, N. C.
TELEPHONE «f
J. T. FAIN
C. M. OGLE
HENRY ATKINf.
Editor
Managing Editor
City Editor
SATURDAY. APRIL 8, 1!>3:5
BIBLE THOUGHT
PRAY FOR THE MISSIONARIES
The missionary letters of the Now Testament are
full of such pleadings as
**I beseech you • . . that ye strive together
with me in your prayers to God for me." (Ro
mans 15:30).
A recent letter from a missionary in Central
Africa closed with these words: I am convinced
that the great thing that keeps us happy and for
ward-looking out here is
" 'Someone, unknown perhaps, and far away,
on bended knee.' "
—Kt'v. Egbert W. Smith, 1>. !>., in "The Desire of
All Nations."
CITY DEBTS PROVE HEAVY BURDEN
(By BRUCE CATTON)
It is probable that no American city will
ever again rush into debt as blithely a*
was the custom during the earlier part of
the past decade.
The chickens, right now, arc coming
home to roost, and the effort to find a place
for their restless feet is giving mayors and
city councilors gray hairs, wrinkles and
sleepless nights in a horrifying manner.
Some cities, of course, are in good shape
financially. Rut they are in the minority.
Bonds totaling something like $15,000,
000,000 are now outstanding against vari
ous American cities, towns and counties,
and Congress is now being asked either t«>
let the cities enjoy a two-year moratorium
or to set up a plan whereby principal and
interest on this stupendous debt could be
scaled down.
The situation represents one ol Uie most
pressing problems the nation has to face.
It also stands as a monument to two mis
fortunes—to the depression itself, which
lessened municipal revenues and increased
municipal expenditures, and to the era of
high, wide and handsome spending which
preceded the depression.
That this tremendous load of debt can
be carried through the recovery period is
extremely doubtful. A moratorium, a gen
eral revision or an epidemic of outright de
faults—one of these, or a combination of
all three, seems to be in prospect.
But suppose that that happens, and thr.t
prosperity eventually returns, with our city
treasuries in a solvent condition once more.
What then? Shall we begin anew the free
spending habits that brought on this trou
ble? Shall we continue to put up with the
inefficient, graft-ridden, politics-perverted
type of city government that caused so
much of thus vast debt load?
If we do, we shall prove that the depres
sion has taught us nothing.
The one great truth that this crisis hgs
made obvious is that the ordinary kind of
city government in this country is too ex
pensive to be tolerated any longer. If we
are smart enough to learn by our trouble?,,
we shall insist on having a new kind.
• ' • -
| NEWSPAPERS' OPINIONS J
©
A LESSON FROM FINLAND
Americans now in the midst of voting on the
question of prohibition repeal can well afford to
consider the case of Finland. One year ago today,
as a result of popular ballot, Finland repealed her
prohibition law . This tide of popular opinion was
largely a result of the economic pressure of the
times. Under extreme duress people call for a
change, often without knowing why but always
with the earnest hope that a change will better
conditions. In America likewise the demand for
repeal of prohibition—just recorded in its most
definite form by th^ 3-to-l popular vote in Michi
gan—has been markedly influenced by economic
discontents.
The Finns was told that repeal would restore
"pre-depression prosperity." retTuce unemployment,
eliminate the bootlegger, and substantially modify
crime. The political leaders having been taken at
their word, a large anti-prohibition vote was re
corded. Now at the end of her first year Finland
takes count of stock. The results are illuminating^
"Prc-depression prosperity" is still around the
corner, no noticeable improvement is felt in the
unemployment situation, bootlegging continues to
thrive, and Crime shows a slight increase. Obvi
ously the answer to these questions was not in re
peal or modification.
The restoration of normal business conditions
will comet in Finland a* in the United States, with
a sane Teadjtfftfttent program supported by con
structive legislation. This is now taking place in
the United States. Unemployment will be elimi
nated as t normal conditions return. Bootlegging
and crime will he banished only with the stricter
enforcement of law and the routing out of organ
ized gangsters.
Today America is on the road back. A gratify
ing unity among leading statesmen and a renewal
of public confidence are mileposts marking prog
ress. Hut prohibition repeal cannot he considered
a promising vehicle for completion of the journey.
—Christian Science Monitor.
CAMPS IN PISGAH FOREST
Pisgah Forest will be amoncr the first of South
ern reservations to feel the effect of the law which
will muster an army of unemployed for forest cor
servation and improvement. Work will he started
at once on four of the ten camps to be used in the
Pisgah reservation and it is announced that the
four camps will be completed and in operation
within three weeks. The remaining camps will be
completed by July 1. Each camp will accommo
date 110 workers and approximately $33,000 will
be distributed monthly.
There are 151 national forests, many larger than
Pisgah and many smaller, and the total number of
workers to be employed in them will bo consider
ably more than 200.000. Their total earnings will
be between six and ten million dollars monthly.
I The enterprise is of major proportions and will
not only release large sums of money in wages but
large purchases will be made by the government
for supplies needed in the camps.
Opposition to the forestry employment bill
I yielded under pressure from the White House. *t
was based upon the small wage of one dollar a day
to be paid. That view lost sight of the main pur
pose of the measure which was to offer a living to
men without work and in addition pay them some
thing which they could send to their homes. Tli-»
plan was intended to keep the wolf from the doo.
of men without work who might be faced witu
starvation. Until it is proved unwise in practice
we must believe that it is a wise and sensible relief
measure.—'Spartanburg Herald.
GEN. NINES' STATEMENT
The declaration by Frank T. Hines, veterans'
administrator, that President Roosevelt's economy
program will save the United States government
$1,203,000,000 in expenditures for hospitals and
veterans' care alone should he heartening to tax
payers and to congressmen who are striving to find
ways for balancing the national budget.
The statement made to the president by Gen.
Ilines has nothing to do with the savings that will
be made in pensions and the decrease of other ex
penses incurred by the government in compensat
ing veterans. It refers to the cost of hospitals, and
the rising tide of veterans claiming treatment and
care in them.
Tiie people of the United States are learning
that they have heen paying sums for veterans of
past wars that dwarf all similar expenses incurred
Iby all the nations of Europe. It is not proposed in
President Roosevelt's economy plan to do injustice
to disabled veterans who are disabled as a result
of service. It is proposed to stop a Hood of imposi
tions upon the taxpayers which was growing and
which, in the end would have bankrupted the rich
est nation on the face of the earth.—Spartanburg
Herald.
FLOOD CONTROL AS PUBLIC WORKS
The great flood now raging through (ho Ohio
River valley, all tht» way from West Virginia to
Indiana, emphasizes the fact that here is one great
public work which very much needs to be done—
flood control.
Several lives have been lost and there is great
i property damage in four or five states.
Although this is said to be the worst flood in
twenty years, it is only a very few years—three
or four—since there was a similar great and cosily
overflow of the waters of this same river.
The idea of great public works for the purpose
of stabilizing employment is just now very much
occupying the nation's official mind, as well as the
I minds of business and industrial leaders.
Various sous of mojre or less unnecessary works
have been and are being proposed to contribute to
' this end.
Here is a project for which there is great and
increasing need, and not in the Ohio River valley
alone, but in a dozen other great water-courses 111
various parts of the country.
And if we may judge by the millions of dollars
of damage every year because of flood waters,
which might be prevented by flood control, it
ought to be mighty profitable work.—Rock Ilill
(S. C.) Herald.
REVENUE AND INDEPENDENCE
The newly discovered potash fields in New Mex
ico and Texas promise to become the l>asis for an
early and important industry. The field in New
Mexico, it appears, is owned by the state, and mir
intr has already been begun by a lessee and a check
for the first royalty has found its way to the state
treasury.
It is said that there are 2,000 sections of land in
a sintrle county that are underlaid with potash, to
the amount of possibly 2.000,000,000 torts. Tho
potash is minpd at a depth of about 900 feet.
The importance of these potash discoveries in
these two states and in one basin in the Far West
cannot well be overestimated, for this country has
ilonjr been dependent upon mainly Germany for its
I potash, an element needful to the production of.
fertilizer, and invaluable in agriculture.—Nashville
| Banner.
Employers have this problem, also: The man
who is likely to he fired is not likely to he fired
with ambition.
Anyway, we have learned that boys aren't really
wizards because they made a profit when stocks
went up.
Imairination is the quality that makes the knock?
sound worse when you couldn't *jet your favorite
kind of gasoline.
i. • ! < ; '* «..r»
But if there were no depressions, there would t>e
no way to drain off the accumulated water.

Synopsis of anti-Roosevelt criticism: If the new
broom sweeps clean, there's nothing for the boys
to mop up.
The Last Flight
Education Board
Act May Become
Effective in 1935
RALEIGH. April 8.—A stale
wide hill reducing county boardsj
r>f education to three-members
will not become effective untlij
11)35 as a result of Representa
tive Martin's (of Runcombe) ob
jection.
The house committee on edu-j
cation was informed by the Run
combe legislator, that, if *hc bill J
became effective this year, il j
would require Runcombe to re
duce its county board from seven!
to five members.
Mr. Martin said that if be vot
ed for a bill to separate four of
i lie seven members from their
jobs, he would face a political,
storm in Runcombo.
At bis request, the committee
amended the bill to make it ef
fective two years hence.
CIVIL FLYERS TO USE
I,F, BOURGET FIELD
PARIS, April X. (IT)—1Tin-!
fate of l.e Bourget airport, un-j
certain for two years, lias been'
determined by the new French
air minister, Pierre Cot.
He had ruled that the famous
field shail be resorved for civil
aviation, the army fliers will seek
other quarters.
I,e Bourget, which is about an
hour's drive from here, was de
veloped as an airport by the
army during the war. Pespitc
the fog frequency, which makes
it inferior to others in the
neighborhood, it was chosen be
cause of its relative proximity
to the war front.
Civil aviation later developed
the airport, and now it is one of
the best in Europe. Because or
the danger to air passengers,
however, the presence of mili
tary craft has been protested, as
has been the case at other air
ports.
Ten niillion francs are to be
spent on improvements to the
field. As a result of the order,
military aviation will "fie center
ed on Villacoublay, a flying
field virtually free of fog.
NEEDY REDSKINS
FEED ON PARK HERD
YKU.OWSTONE I'ARK, Wyo.,
April N. (UP)—From near ex
tinction to such numbers that
Indians and relict' agencies have
been donated surplus animals for
their meat supply, is the history
of the Yellowstone Park, buffalo
herd, now totaling more than
1,000 animals.
In 1902, officials figures list
ed but buffalo in tin
world. Kmerson Hough, after a
.winter inspection trip, said there
were but 2 of the animals in the
park. That year funds were ob
tained for establishment of a
protected herd and by there
were 7*»4 buffalo in the park.
Careful feeding, strict enforce
ment of protective rules, and
even vaccinations were required
to develop the herd. In J!U2,
3911) and 1922 a blood poisoning
disease threatened to wipe out
the herd, but vaccinations count
eracted. the epidemic, and since
that time no serious outbreaks
have taken place.
The herd now has reached such
security that park authorities
each year cull out the infirm,
weak and undesirable animals,
slaughter them, and give the
meat to Indians, or relief agen
cies.
Bones and Brain*
Science in its astonishing way of
doing things, has found that the
mind of a genius grows faster than
his bones. In non-genius, of course,
the head hones develop rapidly—
Columbus (Ohio) State Journal.
HOLLYWOOD FILM SHOP
By ALANSON EDWARDS
Unit etl Press Staff Correspondent
Ry AL.ANSON EDWARDS j
United Press Staff Correspondent
HOLLYWOOD, April K. (UP).|
—Tt. was Marlene Dietrich, of
course, who drew < he season's
"find" for loading man in her
newest vehicle.
lie had turned down no less'
than ten screen offers —and for a 1
lot of money—before he suc
cumbed to the lure of the cellu
loid.
But now IJrian Aherne is a full
fledged movie actor with a bitr
part in "Sow; of Songs" and
hilled for the lead in "Peter Ib
betson" when Paramount gets
around to it.
A young Englishman, not yet
;:0, Aherne has had a remarkable
stage career in Great Britain,
Australia and America. "The
Barrets of Wimpole Street" and
"White Cargo" were anions his
successes.
A heme is six feet, two and on<'
half inclics tail, the same size as
(iary Cooper; ho has blue eyes
and brown hair and ho keeps his
weight down liy tennis golf and j
horseback riding.
And that is all to he currently i
determined about the young man {
who is Ma clone's sculptor lover iii
the picture, save possibly his rea-!
son for taking up with the flick-1
or« . •, I
"I'd always considered myself a '
stage actor," he explained, "1 j
war, happy there and making :il!
the money that was good for me.
"We had expected Katharine
Cornell's play 'Lucrece' to lastj
until June or .Inly hut it closed |
after a brief run. That left me
flat, :;o to speak, and when the !
chance t<> enter films came again
1 didn't need a second urging—ov
maybe it was an eleventh urging.''
Negro Kidnaper
Draws Pen Term
r
ItRKVARD, April s. (Spi-cial)
— Transylvania county's first
"kidnaper" now fact's a term »>f
from five to seven yars in the
r.laU- penitentiary, this sentence
having been imposed l>y Judge
I'. A. McKlroy. presiding at the
April term superior court, in ses
sion hero upon "the Rev. William
Talbert," self-styled negro preach
er who submitted 1i» kidnaping
(icrtrude (>n\ I i year old daugh
ter of a respectable colored cou
ple of this county.
At the hearing held Thursday
before Judge McEJroy, it was
hi ought (nit that '"the Rev. Tal
bert" had a reputation of "skip
ping'' from one love to another.
Seven years ago he was living in
; I'ickens with a woman supposed
to have been his wife; leaving
there he came to Transylvania
[and "married" a daughter of
iGurley Orr, and lived with his
believed-to-be lather-in-law for!
[five years.
Throe weeks aj?o he Id! thei
Oit home and carried with him
, on his last jaunt I he younger!
[daughter of the nejjro family.
ICaptured in Atlanta, (»a., Wed
nesday, "the Rev. Talbert" sub
mitted to charges preferred!
against him. asking witnesses no|
questions and making no com
ment on the Jong term at hard)
labor meted out. I'etween five!
and six hundred people crowded
the courtroom for ih«* trial, the!
■ case having attracted much at-1
tention throughout the couny. !
POLK CO. MAY HAVE
DEPUTY COLLECTOR;

KALKKiH, April S—The house]
Thursday passed a hill, introduc
i ed by Representative Massenburg
of I'olk, which authorizes the
Polk county board of commis
sions to appoint a deputy tax col
lector and fix his compensation.
I It was ordered sent to the sen
ate.
BEHIND THE SCENES IN
WASHINGTON
mitLRQDN SLDUICHES
BY RODNKY 1)1 TCI IKK
MCA Srri Iit Wrltrr
W/ASHIN(iTON, March 00.—As
** statesmen and financiers
wrestle with the complex task of
restoring America's banking sys
tem, the demand for a federal
guarantee of deposits has become
intensified and insistent.
For years regarded as a scheme
of the radicals, deposit guarantee
i has at last come up fv>r serious
consideration at. the White Hotisn
| and in the treasury where men
who control the country's imme
diate destiny have met in secret
| contei'enco to try to iind a way
j out.
» • •
A (SUAHANTEE covering pres
ent deposits seems out of the
question. The federal credit
could hardly prove adequate
because it would be obvious
that it couldn't handle the possi
ble demands for cash. Hence, al
though there is some sentiment
for a law guaranteeing 50 per
cent of present deposits, the more
conservative proponents would
apply the guarantee only to new
deposits. Such a plan, they say,
would help restore banks which
had a chance of salvation, would
restore public confidence in nanks
—even though the public took j
some loss on its present deposits
j —and would, in offect, send the
i banking business off to a new
I start.
But any such scheme first de
mands emergency procedure
which will carry the country
through its present crisis of cash!
and credit and then for the oro-i
if eel ion and supervision of the l>il
I lions of dollars of existing d°
! posits now lied up. These arc gi
! can lie t.isiks.
♦ • *
[YV/lTlf banking paralyzed In 4S
! ** .states and government forced
I to handle the situation, the old
argument that, deposit guarantee
i would mean complete government
control has lost some of its force.
I That is especially true in the pop
ular mind. Chairman Henry It.
Steagall of the House Banking
and Currency Committee says
"one hundred million Americans"
have been besieging Congress for
some such plan as his guarantee
measure, which was passed by the
House, but buried in the Senate.
Many limited forms of deposit
insurance have been proposed and
sojiie senators who object to any
peneral guarantee or to the Stea
gall bill are willing to consider
such a plan for savings deposits.
Senator Vandenberg of Michigan
would create an insurance fund in
the Federal Reserve System which
would pay any "time depositor"
75 per cent of his deposit within
lid (lays of the closing of a bank
The fund would be created by aft
annual tax of one-eighth of 1 pet
cent on all time deposits in Fed
eral Reserve member banks plus
contributions from non-members
desiring to participate. He would
niake the savings affected con
tract deposits rather than demand
deposits. ne says the limited
guarantee would still leave the de
positor with a 25 per cent re
sponsibility for choosing his bank
wisely.
NEW FIGHTING
PLANES TO BE
TESTED SOON
Future Policy Of Army's
Air Corps May Be At
Stake
WASHINGTON. April H. (UP)
Field combat trials, involving the
newest fighting pianos of the
army, will he held a' ramp Knox.
Ky., May 15-27. The trials w:II
be of great value in determining
future policies of the Army Air
Corps, according to the war <lc
partment.
A total of 111! planes will he
used in the trials, including 23
L'onihardment, 18 attack, 21 ob
servation. -15 pursuit and six
transport planes. Thev will b>
selected from fields throughout
the country.
Three anti-aircraft coast artil
lery regiments from New York,
lllinoi? and Alabama, troops of
the Fifth Corps Area, reserve avi
ation units and a signal company
will take part in the trials in ad
dition to the air forces. The ma
neuvers; will be direct^ I by Major
Gen. George Van Ilorn Moseley,
commanding the Fifth Corps
Area.
Development of tactics and
technique of anti-aircraft artil
lery defense, both with and with
out. co-operation of pursuit avia
tion; testing and development of
tactics, technique and equipment
of the air corps: development of
the use of sm<>ke in attack on
[ground forces by pianos; ajyi in
vestigation of the use of dttiant
' intelligence unit-* in co-operation
I with air units assigned to <lefon.se
! Missions are listen as prime pur
I poses of the exercises.
The air and ground forces in
i volved have been divided into two
j groups for the exercises. The at
j tricking group will ho under the
I command of Brig. Gen. Henry C.
i Pratt, assistant chief of the army
J air corps, and the defenders will
j he in the charge of Brig. Gen.
| Julian R. Lindsey, Fort Knox.
The attackers will assemble at
j Patterson Field, Ohio, for prc
i liminary training, while the others
i will be brought together at Fort
| Knox.
j PRISON EXHIBITED
KILLER TO VISITORS
j BEND. Ore., April 8.— (UP) —
j Charles Kimxey, held here on
i charges of murdering three trap
pers in 1924, proved such an ob
ject «>f curiosity at fhc county ja'I
thai he and Joe Allen, serving a
li<|iior sentence, worked up a
profitable trade by charging siglit
!seers 10 cents carh.
When someone approached the
I window, Kim/ev stayed out of
j sight until Allen negotiated and
| collected t!ie dime, then Kimzey
j stopped up to give the customcj^
j a look.
COLLEGES TO MERGE
ST. BAL L. (IT - St. Paul
I.uther College, which will merge
with Kuraka, S. I next fall,
'will remain in St. Paul, u.-ing its
! present campus. I lev. W. K.
! Schmidt, president of tli" schools,
i will head the marged colleges.
L
Story
HAL COCHRAN
(READ THE STOKY, THEN COLON THE iMCTUKE)
Pi IK Tillies 'ViTO fi»' i prb:-.d to m<i
u homo as canity ys could l»«». J
*1 »€*«•. 1 >uf (In: place »•.; small," .- imI j
)in', "but it is c*riI«; ;iM ripht.
'Tin' Midget Man walked in wiHi
Msr, but wo cr-iwlod in npon our
ill' <-s. Of cour.s*' i' wa:"Ti'I built to !
ioiiso ;i chubby Tiny mite."
The M.n said, "Well, ;il \
h:it, you bids jii c rer 11 v not >0
fat It is your- height flint made
ho doorway iniicii to low C«>r you
".lust look around am! don't miml
mo 1011 joy whatever y..u «an
Ami then we'll 'ill turn in. That
is tins next h'1:,' tiling to ■ "
* V *
• */ \If. look* A lin plai" ' <
i l ii'tl. "I wish tjn r,' was
Maz* inside " "Well, I dm.'!." an
swered Windy "I! is hot «•!!•.'. ^!i * it
here.
"Let's open up a window ami
thi^ drift avvuy to : lumb' riaiu!
With rial tush air. we'll wake 111)
in the nioruini; lull of cheer"
The Midget .Man brought blan
kets out and said. "We'll pread
♦ Youtnl ahoiil and llifli \c 1
Tiuio: cm crawl in. I'll use my
I illy l>e'l.
"For you i' pally is Loo Kmall."
"1» it'? worry! Wc don't mind, o'
;tll," : ;tid s- "AM I want/:; a
in t'rsl. iny wrary head."
* ¥ *
IT \\a ii i very loiu; nnMI tjiu little
i ' II' v. ;i. vt-|*y fc'.'ll. ">'*iC 'l uy
mi7* I. <i lixed a !>e<i of »d.».uU«»3
on !ii» llw.r.
Tin ir kind «dd frfi-nd jutt li^l fo
c in, and »li»*n ii<> lurked the whole
!>tiii. !i in. I' ;i!ui'i »' sliiok the
v hide |mhi>»» w hen I he lai'r l»'gan
l«» : ii<»r<-.
T'war.-J tii>Tiliiiu, at flit* window
I!:• i< ;i||i"ir< d two In ads. and
wi i a >.i! '!.• Tinn - would liavr
h d. n ilii-.v Ijad n<»t hem tlcfylns
:'"ll I'd.
Tv.ii mail t-1 la lie ; had found t lie
li«»»!:-•• :mu1 then. as <iuiet as a
tlii'ir l eads popped through
il.r window, ami liny :>larlcd look
ing 'round.
<«'. * • > i .r i:'. I' '. Ni: A Service. Inc.;
('I'lf {jiraflVs play a I rick Oil
l>i!ii( v 111 flii' m vl sforr.l
: - THIS CURIOUS WORLD -
,it.~w9w, « m v rip wit#»jurvT**rv 4
3W
Sleep with theip.
£YES OP&V /
THERE 15" NO
COMBUSTION
AT THE CCNTTR.
OF A
FLAME/
aaooep'm canole wicks do
NOT NEED TO RE SNUFFED.
BECAUSE THi.V CURL OVEP.
ANO EXTEND TO THE OUTER
EDGE Or" THE FLAME, WrlCP.E
7HCRE IS OXV(?£W, ANO
APE THUS CONSUMED.
tN THE OLD DAVX
WICKS WERE STIF£ AND
CONTINUED TO STAND UP
P.'&MT IN THE CENTER OF
THE FLAME. S"!NCE THERE
WAS NO OXYGEN THEPE TO
CAUSE COA\2USTJON, "iNL-y
COULD NOT BURN OPF.
THEREFORE SNUFFING
WAS NECESSARY/
O 1933 BY NCA SCR VICE. INC.
-/ J))
THG PLANET /AA&S ' ——«
Still has plenty of privacy ' \
fROM THE PRYING LVES ON OUP EARTH.
CUR 9EST TELESCOPE'S WOULD NOT
BE ABLE TO REVEAL BUILDINGS Gl>; MARS',
-HOUGH THEY BE /OO TIMES THE S
o.iE OF ANY BtXLDlMG ON CARTH. U-0
SNAKES do not possess movable eyelids'. Their eyries must
therefore remain open cortstintly, wl: ether awake or asioep. The
• ve is protected bv a thin transparent horny disk, continuous with
the skin of the body, and is shed when the snake, casts the
•rest or its skfn. Th*> idarsy'fftnrp'oT'a
Us part. It is unable to do otherwise.

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