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The times-news. [volume] (Hendersonville, N.C.) 1927-current, April 18, 1933, Image 1

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WEATHER
Generally fair Tuesday night
and Wednesday with ruing temp
eratures.
GOOD AFTERNOON
Now comes the happier days
when leather-lunged citizens can
sometimes get a new deal by
simply yelling "Take him out!"
VOL. 52—Nc. 92
HENDERSON VILLE, N. C., TUESDAY, APRIL 18, 1933
SINGLE COPIES; FIVE CENTS
. * c
Roosevei > Is Push ing
LOOMS
* # * # # # - * * * ***,1
Limited Production
<3>
MINIMUM WAGE
ALSO SOUGHT
IN BLACK BILL
Hearing for Revolutionary
Social, Economic Experi
ment May Be Had
arbitration" would
DECIDE JUST WAGES
By THOMAS L. STOKES
United Pre»s Staff Correspondent
WASHINGTON. Apr. 18 (UP) '
President Roosevelt has asked
that national control of produc- j
tion as well as a minimum wage
provision be included in the Black
Connery five-day week, six-hour
bill which the senate finally sent •
yesterday to the house, the United i
Press learned last night. f*
By adding this indus'rial plan-'
nine feature, the president has j,
broadened the measure now pond-: '
ing in the house into a revolution- j
ary social and economic experi-1
ment.
It was known that the president j
has discussed control of produc
tion with his alvisers in a geneva I '
way. It was thought, however,
that his plans had not developed
to the point where they were
ready for submission ot congress.
But it became known yesterday
that Secretary of Labor Frances
Perkins has submitted to the house
labor committee, on behalf of the
president, an amendment which |
would set up a national board to '
provide for control of production.
It would prevent the recurring
surpluses that periodically have
proved the bane of American in
dustry and the workers who de
pend upon it for a living.
The senate gave its final ap
proval to the Black bill yesterday.
It defeated 52 to JJ1 the long
pending motion by Senator Park
Trammel!, Dein., Fla., to recon
sider the measure and then sent
it to the house. The vote came
after pleas by Senators H. D. Hat
field. Repn.. West Va., and Ar
thur F. Vandenbertr. Repn.. Mich.,
to include Hatfield's amendment (
applying the restricted working j
schedule to imports. jj
W ltnous mis Hnu'liumciii OIIIV.I ; (
the senate defeated by only two
votes several days ago, Hatfield
said that American industry j i
would be discriminated against. *
As. it stands, he declared, the j
measure instead of increasing em- j
ployment. would add hundreds of
thousands to the ranks of unem- j ,
ployed.
Speaker Henry T. Kainey re- j
ferred the measure to the house ^
labor committee. Chairman Wil- ;
liam P. Connery immediately j
called the committee to meet
Wednesday. He said yesterday he i c
would suggest that public hear- t
ings be held because of the pro- j
tests from manufacturers which s
have flooded the committee since j"
the senate passed the bill. Th? • .
committee Wednesday will con
sider and make public the amend-1 s
ments submitted by Miss Perkins. £
In addition to the national'
board to survey American indus- .
try and correlate production, Mi.-s I
Perkins recommended boards to
supervise wages and working hour
schedules. i
The amendment on wages f
would not definitely fix a mini- j (
mum wage. It would follow the *
New York law in prescribing a '
just wage and would set up an ar- 11
bitration board to adjust and set- F
tie controversies over wages. It j
was feared a fixed wage might be , 1
declared ur.consti'utional. The I
question of constitutionality also '
has been raised in regard to giv-1
ing the board power over wages, i
This might be revised to give it j
merely arbitral powers such as
the railway meditation board en
joys. depending upon public opin
ion for its effectiveness.
6500 Tarheels ;
Will go to Camps\
_____ ^ | a
RALEIGH, April 18.—(UP)— J
North Carolina will recruit 6,500 ^
men for the civilian conservation .
corps of the federal reforestation |
program, it was decided in a week
end conference in Washington. j.
GEORGIA HAS NEEDY |f
WHO WILL NOT WORK 2
f
AMERICUS. Ga.. April 18.— 11
(UP).—In a front page daily fea- 1;
ture, "We Saw Today," the Amer
icus Times-Recofder said: r
"That a good many of the so- e
called needy in Ame.ricu^ woa'tjf
work when they get a chance." 1c
Brigands Kidnap
U. S. Missionary
apanese troops and Manchoukuo
>fficials are trying: to effect the
elcase of Dr. Niels Nielsen,
ibove, American medical mission
iry, kidnaped by Chinese brigands
lear Mukden. Dr. Nielsen, gradu
ite of the University of Minne-1
ota. formerly resided in Minne-1
ipolis.
PRESBYTERIAL
IS IN SESSION
Hany Auxiliary Members
Attend 3-Day Meeting
Held in Brevard
BREVARD, April IK.— The
Vsheville Presbyterial convened
lere yesterday at the Brevard i
'resbyterian church for a three
ay session. The Brevard-David
on River auxiliary is hostess to
he gathering.
Monday's program included a
leeting of the executive commit
ee followed by a night session
resided over by the president, {
Irs. C. K. Dorsey of Montreat.!
'ommunion service, conducted by1
)r. L. T. Wilds, pastor of the I
'irst Presbyterian church of Hen
ersonville. was held after the
(Continued on page 3.)
.OWER HOUSE VOTES <
EMBARGO POWERS,
WASHINGTON, Apr. 18 (UP) I
)vercoming bitter opposition the
louse passed the arms embargo
esolution giving President Roose
elt power to ban munition ship
lents to warring nations.
The vote was 252 to 110.
Opponents of the resolution
ontended it would open the doer
o co-operative action with the
.eague of Nations and might re
ult in the United States becom
ig embroiled in international
isputes.
The resolution now goes to the
(.mate where speedy action is an
icipated.
iEUEVE WRECK OF
AKRON CONTACTED
NEW YORK. April 18.— (UP)
irapplinsr irons from the tug Sag
more encountered "an object
irge enough to be the main body
f the sunken Akron," the tug re
orted today.
(Continued on page three)
ADMISSIONS OF
GUILT MADE IN
MOSCOW TRIAL
Stand of One Briton and
All Russians on Trial
Shocks Courtroom
SABOTAGE AND SPY
CASE NEAR1NG END
MOSCOW. April 18.—(UP).—'
The fate of six Britons and 11
Russians, charged with high
crimes against the Soviet state i
was placed in the hands of three
judges today when the trial end
ed. A verdict was expected late
tonight.
By EUGENE LYONS
United Prefs S'aff Correspondent
MOSCOW, April 18.—(UP).—
Frank admissions of guilt on the
part of their clients made by at j
torneys for one British and all
the Russian defendants shocked
the courtroom last night when the !
defense attorneys took over the
presentation of their case in the
Metropolitan-Vickers trial.
The lawyer for William Mac
Donald, one of the six Britons
charged with espionage, bribery
and sabotage which may cost
their lives, admitted that his cli
ent's confession was "sincere,
courageous and conscientious."
Far from impugning its credi
bility. the counsel. M. Smirnoff,
held it up as an argument for len
iency. He pictured MacDonald as
a weak, subservient "petit Bour
geois" employe who* obeyed'-the
orders of his superiors but who at
the crucial moment had admitted
everything.
MacDonald's fellow Briton:?
gazed at him and Smirnoff in as
tonishment as thn admission was
heard. MacDonald had sought to
repudiate his original plea_
line up with the others in insist-1
ing he had "confessed" only un-1
der duress.
Attorneys for the Russians in-,
volved first took up the arguments j
at the evening session, after the i
summation for the state had been |
brought to a dramatic conclusion .
by Prof. Andrew Viship.sky, chief '
prosecutor for the Soviets.
One by one they spoke, and
none made any effort whatsoever
t,o deny the guilt of his client.
They arose and in comparatively
brief speeches instead pleaded
extenuating circumstances had
caused the Russians to succumb
to the alleged bribes of the Brit
ish defendants.
The attorneys reached oratori
cal heights in denouncing the
British.
"The clutching hand of a for
eign intelligence service" was
held responsible by M. Kazna-.
chevev, defense counsel for three
of the' Russian engineers, Peter j
Oleynik, Vassili A. Gusev and j
Vassili Sklolov. He was the first
to intimate that their inveigle
ment by what he described as a
clever and Well-financed British j
spy system, would be the defense j
tactics for all the Russians.
Kaznachayev argued that Oley-j
nik was less culpable because he -
had worked for foreigners, and j
not directly for the state.
MISS KENNEDY TO WED
HOLLYWOOD, April 18. (UP)
Merna Kennedy, former leading
lady for Charlie Chaplin, yester
day said she would marry Busby
Berkeley, creator of dance ensem
bles, in June.
ROOSEVELT'S OPPOSITION 1
TO CURRENCY INFLATION
DEFEATS BLOC IN SKIRMISH!
WASHINGTON. Apr. 18 (UP) '
iponsors of currency inflation
ugislation received a double set-1
ack in congress today. The sen- j
te abandoned the current out- {
reak of currency inflation debate
nd the house rules committee re-j
orted favorably a change in the
ules which, if accepted by the
ouse, will serve to block inflation j
egislation there.
Br HARRY FERGUSON
Jnited Press Staff Correspondent
WASHINGTON, April 18. (UP),
'resident Roosevelt's opposition
ent the currency inflation bloc
own to defeat yesterday in the
irst senate skirmish of the bat
le to cheapen the American dol
lr- . I
The senate rejected an amend-!
lent offered by Senator Wh<?el
r, Democrat. Montana, to the|
trnr relief bill, providing for t.he
oittngiN'O-f silver, int a ratio of «
WW fK> V- T
:o 1 with cold.
The vote was 43 to 33.
Shortly before the vote was
:aken, Democratic leader Robin
son, in reply to a question by
Senator Borah, Republican, Idaho, I
said:
"I can assure the senator that
:he president is opposed to this
amendment."
Robinson's announcement spell
?d the doom of the attempt of
the currency inflation group—
composed of progressive senators
af both the Republican and Dem-!
jcratic parties—to return to the!
William Jennings Bryan formula'
:hat was a prime issue in politics
more than 35 years ago.
A curious situation developed
in the senate as debate progress
ed on Wheeler's proposal. No
body spoke against the amend
ment but when it came time £o
ake a toll call the opponents of
(Contrnued on page three)
Strike Gold in Deserted Town
Virginia City, New, deserted mining metropolis of the great gold
and silver strikes of 1870, is springing back into life. For under a
house, on land bought for $150, has been found a new vein of gold,
believed to be a major strike. Above is Virginia City's deserted main
street. Below, right, Oscar Lewis, discoverer of the new lode, is
holding a specimen of the gold ore. Below, left, miners tunnel under
the deserted house.
DEMOCRATIC TICKET HAS NO j
PARTY OPPONENTS IN CITY;
NO REPUBLICANS OFFERING
"Excuse Me"
I just stepped out of the new s«-|
rial, "Darling Fool," and I'm
ready to step right into your fife
—if you'll let me. I'm Monica!
O'Dare, the girl Mabel McElliott
wrote the serial about. It begins
today on page four.
Retention of Water Board i
Sole Issue That Could |
Develop in Balloting ofi
Tuesday, May 2
Hendersonville's municipal elec
tion, set for Tuesday, May 2, wi'l
be a mere formality in so far as
the selection of city officials is
concerned.
This became assured at 4 o'clock
yesterday afternoon, the time lim
it set for filing; for office. At that
time no Republican candidates
had filed and no opposition had
developed on the Democratic
ticket The city thus is saved the
expense of holding a primary
election.
Whatever interest may develop
in tho election will he centered on
the question of whether qualified
voters of the city wish to abolish
the board of water commission
ers, repeal all laws pertaining
thereto and turn the administra-j
tion of the city's water system j
over fo the board of city commis
sioners.
About 200 additional voters
qualified for the city election by
registering1 during the period per
mitted by law. but in view of tho
lack of a contest cither within the
Democratic party or between tho
Democratic and Republican par
ties it appeared certain that the
vote on May 2 will be small in
comparison with elections held in
former years. Only 25 or .'{0 new!
voters registered voluntarily, the
remainder of the registration be- '
ing effected by election workers, J
thus indicating a low ebb in in- j
terest in the election.
Mayor A. V. Edwards and I
three commissioners—L. A. Blair,
B. F. Foster and L R. Geiger—
are candidates to succeed them
selves. while a fourth, W. M.
Sherard. former mayor, has of
fered for a two-year term to fill
a vacancy on the board. Dr. W.
O. Allen and J. H. Riggan are
hold-over members of the board.
City officials pointed out today
that the question of abolishing the
water commission will be voted •
on separately and asserted that
they are interested in the outcome
merely as individual citizens.
(Continued on page three)
Japs Reject |
Rail Protest |
By Russians
JUNIOR ORDER
TO MEET HERE
EARLY IN MAY
300 Delegates Expected;
Local Council Confer
This Evening
The regular meeting of the
Junior Order United American
Mechanics will be held tonight at
8 o'clock in Woodman Hall 0:1
Main street.
Councilor M. Allard Case urges
that all members be present t'i
make plans for the district meet
ing which is to be held on May 5
with the local council.
Members are hoping to make
that meeting one of the most in
teresting that has been held yet
in the district. There will prob
ably be 300 delegates from all
over Western North Carolina for
this event.
Funeral Services
Held Yesterday i
For Drake Lad!
Funeral services were held yes-1
terday afternoon at 2 o'clock forj
Franklin Drake, the 14-year-old i
son of Mr. and Mrs. F. P. Drake |
of Oakland street, at Stepps Fu-j
neral home and interment was at.!
Pattys Chapel, Fletcher.
The Rev. W. H. Ford conduct-1
ed the services, both at the fu-|
neral home and at the cemetery. I
Miss Mamie Perry sang two solos,!
"Under His Wing" and "Some
Time We Will Understand." Mrs.
W. B. Sinclair was the accompan
ist at the piano.
The deceased who expired Fri
day in a Kinston, N. C., hospital'
after a lingering illness, is sur
vived by his father and mother
and two sisters, Dorothy and
Helen.
The pallbearers were N. B. Bald
win, E. J. Baldwin, W. E. Bald
win, J. F. Baldwin, Ira Baldwin
and Joe Freeman.
FLYER BAILS OUT
IN HIS TEST TRIP
RALEIGH, April 18.—(UP)—
Percy Hicks, of Durham, escaped
death late Monday when, unable
to bring his airplane out of a
spin, he jumped with a parachute.
Hicks was taking a private pi
lot's test in a biplane with a com
merce department i n s pe c t o r
watching from the ground. Under
the regulations, he was to go into
a spin and then prove his ability
to right his ship. He failed, how
ever, but managed to get clear of
the plane before it crashed.
REDUCTION OF $144,000,000 IN j
WAR DEPARTMENT FINANCING
TO GET ROOSEVELT'S OKAY
i
I
WASHINGTON, Apr. 18 (UP)
The proposed drastic reductions
of the navy's operating expenses
may cause dismissal of 20,000 of
the 44,000 civilian employes at
r.avy yards over the country, it
was learned on high authority to
day.
By FREDERICK A. STORM
United Press Staff Correspondent
WASHINGTON, April 18 (UP) 1
President Roosevelt last night was
reported ready to approve a re
duction of $144,000,000 in the i
cost of America's army as one of
the first steps in his general pro
gram of economy and budget bal
ancing. y # ]
Mr. Roosevelt who is desirous i
of slashing a billion dollars from i
direct appropriations in the next i
fiscal year was said to feel that i
590,000,000 could be lopped from i
military expenditures and $54,- i
1)00,000 from non-military expen
rlitures of the war department
md at the same time preserve an
jfficient fighting machinc suitable
for peace time purposes.
To carry out such a drastic re
iuction program, similar to tha:
which will be applied to all gov-!
eminent departments, Secretary
:>f War Dern was of the belief
hat from 12,000 to 15,000 enlist
ed men and 2,000 officers would
lave to be dropped from the rolls,
ilso that the rivers and harbors
mprovement work under supervi
sion of the war department would
lave to be curtailed.
Administration circles while ad
mitting such a sweeping reduction
Dlan would effect employment fig
ires, were convinced that so far
is the non-military activities were
:oncerned, they could be carried
Hit under a bond issue for neces
sary public works. This ,would
nean, it wa3 argued, that the
(Continued on page three) 'q
Accused Breaking Protec
tion Pact; Reply Made
Manchuokuo Is Now the
Joint Operator
TOKIC), April 18.—(UP).—A
vigorous protest against Japan's
"interference with Soviet ri^nts"
in the operation of the Chinese
Eastern railway was made by Mos
cow today.
The protest accused Japanese
of violating the agreement to pro
tect Soviet property as made at
the outset of the Manchurian in
cident.
Government spokesmen said
that Japan will reject any pro
tests and that the maintenance of
the railway now rests strictly with
Russia and the Manchoukuo rov
crnment as joint operators of the
road.
'Deposit' Trade
Measure Voted
Hood Will Seek to Procure
Senate Reversal .i{
RALEIGH, Apvil 18.—Repre
sentative William A. Sullivan of ;
Buncombe last night jammed
through both houses of the gen
eral assembly a bill which would
allow depositors of closed state
banks in that county to sell de
posit claims held by them to debt- ,
ors who can apply the purchased
"deposit" against any money
owed the bank.
The bill was passed in t both !
houses under suspension of 'rules. ,
Senator W. R. Francis, of Hay- !
wood, handled the details in the j
senate for Sullivan in the absence ,
of Senator Blackstock, of Bun-jj
combe.
The measure was condemned as :
"terrible'' by Commissioner Gur
ney P. Hood who said he will ask ,
that the senate reconsider its ,
vote today. He wants it referred '
to the senate committee on banks j
and banking: where, he feels con
fident. it will be killed.
Representative Sullivan said he ,
would fight the commissioner and
insist upon ratification. It be- ,
comes a law upon ratification.
WOULD END ASSEMBLY !
MEETING APRIL 30 j
RALEIGH, April 18.—(UP)— i
Senator T. Leroy Kirkpatrick, of
Mecklenburg, introduced a reso- <
lution in the senate today calling 1
for a sine die adjournment of the <
general assembly April 30.
The resolution said that the <
assembly had been in session 3l«j
days beyond the regular 60-day
period and that it would be an i
economic, industrial, and agricul- <
tural advantage to adjourn as t
soon as possible. (
FANNING CORN BETTER i
The condition of Fanning Corn.lt
who was struck by an automobile i
an Saturday night, was reported t
as improved at the Patton Me
morial hospital today. s

IS PLANNED TO
AVOID ATTACK
ON JEHOL AREA
Fjghting Below Chinese
Wall Is Over Unless New
Assaults Made
AMERICAN^ PREPARE
TO QUIT WAR ZONE
SHANHAIKWAN. China, April
18.— (UP).—Establishment of a»i
independent Chinese regime in
the region of Peiping and Tient
sin was forecast in informed cir
cles here today as Japanese mili
tary officials indicated their cam
paign proper is now finished un
less China counter attacks.
The success of the latest Japa
nese drive formed basis of belief
in a new and independent regime
which would serve as a buffer
against Chinese assaults upon the
subjugated Jehol province.
TUNGHOW BOMBED
PEPING, April 18.—(UP).
Three Japanese airplanes today
bombed Tungchow, 10 miles east,
of Peiping, where there is a 1'ni
ted States boarding school.
By HERBERT R. F.KINS
United Press Staff Correspondent
PEIPING, April 18.— (UP).—
Americans prepared to evacuate
their posts in North China last
night as the Japanese offensive
iin. . ~ * -a,
The tJhlted. States mini&ier,
Neliwi T-'JohrtWrr, notified his'
:onsul-general to Tientsin. Frank
Lockhart, a veteran in the China
service, that he would be held re
sponsible for the safeguarding «»f
United States citizens in the war
tone.
The minister empowered Lock
lart to advise American Nation
ils to evacuate outposts between
rientsin and the wall, where con
siderable United States mission
jroperty is located. Consular and
liplomatic authorities have no
lower to force Americans t.»
•vacute, but ordinarily in emer
gencies such as this their 'advice'
s sufficient.
The station master at Chanirli,
vhere American Methodist mis
sion property is located, including
i hospital and school, informed
lis superiors that Japanese air
danes have dropped five bombs
lear the mission buildings during
in air raid over the Chinese lines.
The telegram from Chanjrli was
supported by an official Chinese
nilitary communique declaring
hat a Japanese plane had
Iropped 30 bombs at Shih-Hsi. 50
niles north of Peiping, killing the
eader and 10 workers in the Red
Swastika (Cross) Association's re
ief unit there.
ine communique ciaimea uic
Chinese shot down the Japanese
lir raider, but not before he had
lone wide damage.
Verifying reports of heavy
ighting along the Great Wall
>rior to the Japanese push south
ward, seizing a 250-mile triangle
n the Chinwangto area, foreign
oservers who went over the bat
lefields reported they found 7,
>00 Chinese wounded.
The Peiping authorities esti
nated 4,000 killed and 3,000
'thers so badly wounded thai
hey were unable to be brought
nto the capital for hospital treat
nent.
The Chinese fell back to the
outh bank of the Luan river, for
"last stand" in defense of Tient
in. The Japanese consolidated
heir positions at Chinwangalo, on
he sea, and Pcitaho, popular sum
ner resort outside the port, set
ing up local self-governments.
(Continued on page three)
TIBS CMim
OF WHAT IS THE FOT
Mw IS THE NAME USED IN MAKING i
, GIVEN THIS 9 r., HATS WX '
■ i. fi 1
For cMroct An»w*f» 'totbooY
aeitiona, pltaae turn to page $

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