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The times-news. [volume] (Hendersonville, N.C.) 1927-current, April 19, 1933, Chamber Of Commerce Edition, Image 7

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063811/1933-04-19/ed-2/seq-7/

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MOUNTAINS YIELD FRESH
SUMMER BREEZES AND WARD
Hendersonvilk Climate, Free From Extremes, Has |
Been Famed for 100 Years—Maiaria-Carrv
ing Mosquito Is Unknown
TEMPERATURES. RAINY DAYS AND PRECIPITATION
Monthly
Mean Moan or Mean Precip. *Kainy
Minimum Average Maximum ir. Inches Pay<
January 27.38.T 49.4 4.02 *«
February 28.0 38.> 49.8 5.23 V
March "'o.T 47.2 58.9 5.S8 10
April 41.8 34.3 60.8 4.23
May 5').2 02.9 75.8 4.08 II 1
June - 57.k' 69.4 81.0 0.15 13
Juiy 61.1 72.! S3.'? 6.50 15:
August 61.1 • 71.9 S2.7 7.15 14
September ~ - 54.7 66.1 77.8 4.43 8
October _T 44.5 56.5 68.6 4.02
November 1 34.1 46.2 58.5 2.84 :
December 28.2 38.0 49.1 5.81 t>.
Annual 43 7 55.2 60.S 62.20 *121.
"'Average number o; days wi:h 0.01 inch >r move precipitation.
All the climutoiegica! averages giver, herewith aro taken from the
official recordings of ' he >>ast 23 year? as made T. W. Valentine, '
co-operative observer for the i*. 8. veath.v bureau.
The climate of Iier..;.t?rsonvi!!e
has been recognised for its salu
brious qualities since Pr. Ha--.lv. ;
South Carolinian. loca:..! hev ■*
move than 100 years ago an i
widely proclaimed i:s many ad
vantages.
After learning of it? hea!;h-r *
storing qualities. Pr. Hardy, said
to have been the first medical pio
neer of note to this section, dis
seminated th? favorable and pap
ular information to hi- numerous
friends in his native state ana
elsewhere. This resulted in the es
tablishment. over a hundred years
ago. of a colony of wealthy South
Carolina^ at Flat Rock, now a
large settlement of beautiful es
tates adjoining Hendersonville.
This greatly enhanced the pop
ularity of our climate for rest,
recreation and recuperation — a
paradise for the preservation or
restoration of health.
There is a striking and highly
favorable relation found in our
altitude <2,153 feet), our latitude
(33 1-3 degrees north) and our
proximity to the eas srn half of
the United States. Our altitude
gives cool summer nights with a
mean or average minimum of 61.1
degrees of temperature during
July and August (which is too
low for the existence of the
malaria-carrying mosquito in this
latitude). An average maximum
temperature of 49.4 degrees in
December. January and February
is highly favorable. Our central
location and proximity to most
people in Eastern America serve
to increase the popularity of our
climate among those who are seek
ing a healthful, comfortable cli
mate free from the severity of the
frozen north and oppressive sum
mer heat of the south.
As our climate (free from ex
tremes of heat and cold and fa
mous for health-giving qualities)
becomes more widely known the
greater the number of those who
come for a brief vacation, for a
visit during the summer to enjoy
our cool nights, for a winter to
escape the extreme cold of the
north, or for rest and recupera
tion.
Our mile-high mountains doub
ly serve to give us a glimpse of
the beauty and grandeur of a
country swept by cool, pure, fresh
mountain breezes, and cool sum
mer nights, as well as to throw up
a high mountain wall or barrier to
shield us from wintry blasts.
The daily variation in tempera
ture—most favorably affected by
the altitude of this section—is vi
tally important in summer. While
the heat of summer midday is
comfortably borne, being usually
accompanied by delightful breezes,
the low temperature on summer
nights requires covering and is
conducive to sound, restful, re
freshing, body-building recupera
tive £leep. The average daily
range for July and August, the
two warmest months, is 22 de
grees, which is a popular feature
of the climate of the Henderson
ville territory.
Hendersonville is situated on an
elevated plateau and is practically
free from smoke and fogs.
Hendersonville is free from
regular wet and dry seasons, hav
East Flat Rock, |
Fletcher Both on
State Highways!
Are Among Enterprising
Communities Lying
in This County j
East Flat Rock and Fletcher
are the largest towns in Hender
son county outside Henderson
vilie. East Flat Rock, with a
population of about 1000, is sit
uated three miles southeast on :h.?
edge of the famous Flat Rook
section, while Fletcher, long an
important community center, is
situated almost midway between
Hendersonville and Asheville.
Many other enterprising com
munities are within a radius of
a few miles of the county seat,
including Balfour. Tuxedo. Dana,
j Mills River. Fruitland. Brickton,
Davis Station, Horse Shoe, Bac
ker Heights, Bat Cave, Boyls
ton, Ednevville, Etowah, Holly
Springs Mountain tiome, zat
conia, Penrose and Laurel Park.
The latter is an incorporated
town, its board of commission
ers administering the affairs of
the settlement on the side of
Jumpoff mountain, at the west
ern edge of Hendersonville and.
atop which is the uncompleted ■
skyscraper hotel, the Fleetwood.
Both Fletcher and East Flat
Rock are on the mam line of the
Southern railway through Hen
; dersonville.
I ing an annual rainfall of 62.20
inches weH distributed over the J3
• year. Drizzly weather is Tare.'
There is an abundance of sun
shine.
Hendersonville's average maxi
mum temperature for the three J
' coldest winter months is inviting i
at 49.4 degrees.
Tho average or mean tempera-»
•ture for this same period is 38.7
—comfortably above the freezing ,
point. Even the mean minimum,:
the coldest average over the three i
winter months, is comfortably high
at 27.9 degrees. This invites ex
tensive and comfortable outdoor
; activities.
j The daily variation of tempera
ture rn winter (over 21 degrees) ,
1 is vitally important. One is able
to sleep comfortably at night de- j
spite lower temperatures. In the •
absence of mountain barriers toj
the east and the community's com
; parative freedom from smoke and f
fog the winter son bathes the j
Hendersonville plateau vith i
; warmth early in the morning. |
Snows are, as a rule, lijht and ;
infrequent, the annual Buowfall
j being only eight inches. •
The average date of the first
killing frost in autumn is Octo-1
i ber 16L. .,
The average date of the la?t:
: killing frost in spring is April 22.'
For 30 Years the Trading; Center of Hendersonville!
OUTFITTERS TO THE ENTIRE FAMILY
says
"Don't
worry
about
the
family
budget'
Dear Folks:
Your money is yours, and whenever you can save five cents,
ten cents, fifteen cents, twenty cents, on an article that costs a
dollar, it is your bounden duty to do so. 1 have spent a whole life
time in making just such savings possible. I have loved to plan
my merchandising so that by careful buying I could obtain mer
chandise which I could sell at a price under the next man, thereby
saving to my customer* this difference.
It has been a great pleasure to me to plan and plan and plan
my business so the folks of my community could say: "Why, you
can get that article at Patterson's for less money than thai!" You
know that makes me feel happy, when my good friends can say
that of my efforts.
There is no way of telling just how many tens of thousand* of
dollars I have saved to the people of Hendersonville and Hender- •
son county by selling good goods at low prices. And I am follow
ing that course now more closely than ever before. I want you to
come in and see, for yourself just what it means to you to trade at -
Patterson's.
H. PATTERSON.
We extend a cordial welcome to anyone contemplating residence in
or a visit to Hendersonville. -
PATTERSON'S
■ DEPARTMENT STORE, 1N€.

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