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The times-news. (Hendersonville, N.C.) 1927-current, November 17, 1933, Image 2

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dht (Hhnra-Nftns
Hendersonville News Eitablislied in 1894
Hendersonville Times Established in 1881
Published every afternoon except Sunday at 227
North Main street, Hendersonville, N. C., by The
Times-News Co., Inc., Owner and Publisher.
TELEPHONE 87
J. T. FAIN Editor
C. M. OGLE Managing Editor
HENRY ATKIN City Editor
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
By Times-News Carrier, in Hendersonville, o«r else
where, per week 12c
By in Hendersonville, per year $5.00
Due to high postage rates, the subscription price
of Times-News in Zones above No. 2 will b»;
based on the cost of postage.
Entered as Second Class Matter at the Post Office
in Hendersonville, N. C.
> FRIDAY. NOYEMBER 17. 1933
BIBLE THOUGHT
TOTAL ABSTAINERS
"WW will drink no wine: for . . . our father com
manded us saying, 'Ye shall drink no wine.' Thus
have we obeyed the voice of our father."—(Read
J«r .M).
mi * * *
What God thinks of sobriety may be gathered
from "His pronouncements concerning the Recha
bite* -(-x.19). GOD HONORS TOTAL ABSTAIN
ERS. Jeremiah's test of the Rechabites exhibited
their strength of character and brought the praise
of 6od. Their obedience to parental training ought
to Inl'ourage Christian parents to similar action.—
Ernest M. Wadsworth, director of the Great Com
mis*i*k Prayer League.
tHE PARK TO PARK HIGHWAY
One. of the most important developments
to date in connection with the Great Smoky
Mountains National Park is that made in
Washington yesterday that Secretary of
the Interior Ickes has approved the con
struction of the proposed Park to Park
Highway, to connect the Great Smoky and
Shenandoah national parks.
The federal government wili supply the
mortey to do this big construction job. The
States of Virginia, North Carolina and Ten
nessee will be required to aid in selecting
the route for the highway and will be re
quired to furnish the rights-of-way. It is
estimated that the building of the highway
will cost fifteen million dollars or more.
Rights-of-way 200 feet wide will be re
quired.
Prominent North Carolinians who are
working with Secretary Ickes and other
federal officials in securing the construc
tion of this highway are reported as being
unanimously of the opinion that the road
should follow the crest of the Blue Ridge
in this State. If their plans are adopted
the road will enter North Carolina near
Sparta and will come through the moun
tains by Boone, Blowing Rock. Linville
Falls, Alta Pass, Little Switzerland, Mt.
Mitchell and the Craggies to Asheville and
then on into the Smoky Park.
This highway will undoubtedly be one
of the most far reaching and important de
velopments in connection with the Smoky
Park. Its location, traversing the most pic
turesque mountain country in the eastern
part of the United States, and the fact th?t
it will make the Park directly accessible
to the vast population in that section of the
country from Washington to the New Eng
land States, will bring millions of people
to the Smoky Mountains in the years to
come.
Mayor O'Brien of New York is to get a
pension of nearly $15,000. Who wouldn't
want to be fired with that amount of
money?
Six out of every ten persons have one
leg shorter than the other, say scientists.
They should let the politicians pull the
other leg. for a change.
The League of Women Voters still had
money left when the last campaign was
over. The women will never get anywhere
that way.
Even though England is to offer us onW
$7,500,000 as a token payment on her war
debt, we understand the token will be
taken.
NEWSPAPERS' OPINIONS
SHALL CRIME NEWS BE CENSORED?
Will a rigid censorship of crime news be of as
sistance in combatting the spread of lawlessness in
this country?
Such a plan i? suggested by the winner of an anti
crime contest conducted by the United States Flag
association.
Similar suggestion has been advanced again and
again by those who seem to believe that the way
to eliminate an evil is to ignore it.
A "rigid censorship," if it means anything at all,
can only mean the virtual suppression of all impor
tant crime news, which would seem to serve no
other purpose tha i to create a roseate though false
view of American life among newspaper readers.
We have had altogether too much of make-b*
Lufl jjj the conduct of our national affairs dun*
recent years. Persistence in ignoring the evils o?
prohibition only served to make those evils the
greater.
A knowledge of facts combined with a true in
terpretation of them is of prime importance to th>?
future economic and spiritual progress of any com
munity, state or nation.
Crime news is not pleasant reading but if there
is one thing that criminals have most reason to
fear it is an aroused public opinion against crime
—a public opinion that will demand the eradica
tion of predatory lawlessness and back up the
forces of law enforcement and justice to the limit.
We are having an effective demonstration of
what an art. ised public opinion can do against kid
naping and racketeering. It has been a long time
in the making but unquestionably it is the result
of the continuous and widespread publicity given
by the press to this sort of criminal activity.
Furthermore, it is safe to say that the success :,p
any campaign against crime depends almost en
tirely upon the backing cf a determined popular
sentiment that can come only from full and com
plete knowledge regarding crime condition.—The
Rock Hill (S. C.) Herald.
TRIBUTE TO EDUCATION
The tribute of A1 Smith to public education is
the encomium not of one who has been advantage.!
by its blessings, but of one who appreciates its
value because of his deprivation.
As a boy he was denied the opportunities fcr
such schooling as now is given not only, but en
forced upon the child of the most forgotten and
obscured parentage.
The log cabin or the modest urban school is not
responsible for the rise of this man to national
notice and political eminence. His is the exception
that proves the rule. His attainment of high hon
ors, in the realm of politics, his talent for states
manship. the scholastic distinction which has come
to him as the recipient of an L.L.D. from HarvarJ,
have resulted not through the cumulative benefits
of educational opportunity, but in spite of the cir
cumstance that* he had none.
And this ousrht to make all the more emphatic
Governor Smith's pronouncements upon the ques
tion of public education and to give his timely
warning sounded in Albany a few days ago the
wings of the wind as it goes forth to call public
attention to the peril of making education pay the
bill for essential governmental economies.
"It's all right to have economy," he said. "Let
everything else go by in times of stress, but don't
let false economy fall on our public schools. . . .
I could name dozens of activities we could get
along without in time of trouble. . . . We can build
roads any time . . . but where you lose one year
in public education it can never be regained."
Nothing has contributed more vitally to progres
sive civilization than education. To be sure, it is
possible to measure human advancements of a civ
ilizing nature with the gradual steps that have been
taken to make this an educated world.
The advice, therefore, of Governor Smith is
timely and impressive. L is the counsel of a man
who knows both sides of the question—that of the
need for economy as well as that of the need ir>
keep the fires of educational progress burning.—
Charlotte Observer.
SPEND JUDICIOUSLY
Public sentiment apparently has turned against
the government's relief policy and those in charge
of administering the relief. Some difficulty is b»
ing experienced because of the above-the-average
wage being paid relief workers. There are some
who will not seek other work when they can get re
lief work one or two days a week at the established
wasre scale.
But an even graver complaint, and one that at
least has some grounds, is that some of the so
called "made-work" is unnecessary. There are in
stances where large crews of men have been sent
to repair a small wooden bridge, when one-third
of the men worked and the others stood around
and watched. Actually, there wasn't room on tho
bridge for the crew.
Another crew digs palmettoes in an open stretch
of woods. InNtwo years, if the tract isn't taken
care of, the palmettoes will be as thick as ever.
There are some jobs that ought to be done with
relief labor, jobs that would prove of considerable
benefit to the general public, at the same time giv
ing jobs to the unemployed.
As a rule, the people want the government to
spend money, but nobody wants to see money
wasted, even relief money.—Florida Advocate.
THE BALDWIN
Massachusetts traces the ancestry of another fa
mous offspring. The Baldwin apple is declared to
have come from a chance seedling on the farm of
John Ball, near Lowell, about 1745. W. H. Thicss,
State College promologist, finds that after the Rev
olution Deacon Samuel Thompson took apples from
the flourishing tree to Colonel Baldwin of Wo
burn, who liked them so well that he gave the fruit
his name and started it on it> way to becoming one
oT 'he orchard leaders of the nation. But for years
it was merely "that woodpecker apple"—and wise
woodpeckers tried to absorb the whole crop.—The
Christian Science Monitor.
PUNISH
Why do men carelessly drop matches and ciga
rettes on other people's woodland and do thousands
of dollars' damage to both timber and land?
Smoke has settled over Eastern Carolina for
days from burning timber and turf, which ha:;
taken many years to grow, and which will not be
reproduced in a generation.
The law is,strictly against burning woods, yet it
does not curb carelessness.
A few cases where severe punishment is meted
are needed.-i—Williamston Enterprise.
A LOST ART
If you are an adult, say about middle-age, and
your early years were spent on a farm where a
well-balanced farming program was the rule of th<?
day, think back until you can recall an institution
as inseparable from Thanksgiving as the turkey:
The pumpkin pie. We are inclined to feel that
pumpkin pie baking in this day and time is an ari
•dangerously near being lost. Prohibition spoiled
the mines pie; disuse is about to remove the pump
kin from smalV list of dishes that belong in' a
5category to themselves.—Rocky Mount Telegram.
ALL QUIET ALONG THE POTOMAC?
M CURRENCY (1
J, » o o o
fW
tqot ^
toot
gOM7
SEES FAILURE
FOR IL DUCE
Alternative Is Willingness
to Relinquish Power,
Says Harvard Man
By MARTIN KANE
United Press Staff Correspondent
CAMBRIDGE, Mass., Nov. 17.
(UP).—Italy's new deal, as an
nounced by Premier Benito Mus
solini. probably will be a failure
unless II Duce indicates he is wil
ling to relinquish power instead
of steadily acquiring more, ac
cording to Arthur N. Holcombe,
professor of government at Har
vard University.
"Mussolini produced noth
ing so far but a series of shatns,"
he told the United Press yester
day. "and the projected industrial
set-up cai be nothing else unless
it is truly representative and not
composed of mere shams."
The Iti.'ian premier has an
nounced the ultimate elimination
of the present parliamentary sys
tem. to be replaced by individual
guilds and a central guild council
which would separate economic
and political legislation. Th2
guilds would represent the vari
ous industries, as well as agricul
ture and banking, and each would
legislate for its own field.
"We have in this country," Pro
fessor Holcombe said, "the codifi
cation of industry under the NRA.
That is real. It is an actual devel
opment in actual operation and it
is genuinely representative. The
Swope plan would have control in
the hands of business and, even at
present, industrial disputes are to
be settled between capital and la
bor, with labor furnishing its own
representatives. The representa
tives are not handpicked.
"That is a truly American plan.
It remians to be seen whether
Mussolini is willing thus to share
power."
Professor Holcombe said he be
lieved it entirely possible that, al
though Mussolini has been consid
ering the "corporate state" since
1926, he may have been influenced
to bring it forward at this time
by recent American developments.
"It is not unlikely," he said,
::that the Italian people have seen
that America is trying to accom
plish something1 definite and that
a demand has arisen that a similar
effort be made there. The idea of
the corporate state was brought
forward in 11)26 and the project
has not yet been realized. It is
sliil very vague but now it looks
as if Mussolini felt obliged to
make good on this project, about j
which he has been oalking so long. J
Whether he will do that or turn
out just another sham is a ques !
tion which time alone will an
swer."
Although describing II Duce's
project as "interesting," much a^
a physician might regard the an
nouncement of a new cancer
cure, he .expressed doubt that
even a policy of "watchful wait
ing" is worthwhile, "there is :;o
little chance that Mussolini will
actually permit anyone but him
self to have a-ithority."
"Of course," he added, "Mus
solini is an able man. He might
'Some day piloduce something real
and this may be it. But what they
are doinj? in Washington is much
more worthwhile, from the pres
ent outlook, at least." <
Lower Tracey Grove
LOWER TRAC,Y GROVE, Nov.
17.—People in this community are
making the most of the present
weather for killing hogs and sev
eral have boon killed to date.
Mr. and Mrs. Buford Pell and
children spent Sunday with Mrs.
Bell Gordon of Saluda.
Mr. and Mrs. Cash Morgan of
this community have moved to
Dana. *
. A very enjoyable corn hulking
was given at the home of Mr. and
Mrs. Freno Jones Monday night.
All reported a nice time.
Mrs. Vernon Morris and daugh
ter, Valreen. were dinner guests
of Mr. and Mrs. Prince Arnett of
Druid Hills, Sunday.
Mrs. H. M. Hoke, of Hender
soitville, called on Mrs. A. B. Sta
ton Sunday afternoon.
Mr. and Mrs. James Sexton,
formerly of this place, have
moved to Hendersonville.
Mr. and Mrs. Freno Jones and
children visited Mr. and Mrs.
Cash Morgan, of Dana. Sunday.
Mrs. Pierce Williamson spent
Monday afternoon with Mrs. II.
A. Stepp, of Flat Rock.
The friends of Mrs. Kirk Stepp.
Justices Occupy
Fleming St. Home
Judge J. Foy Justice and fam
ily and the Rev. A. I. Justice have
removed from their home near
Blue Ridge School to 1027 Flem
ing street, city, the place adjoin
ing the property of Fassifern
School. Thty will reside there
<luring the winter. Judge Justice
has been indisposed for severul
<lays, but is recovering.
Arthur Bennett
Now Seriously 111
Friends of Mr. and Mrs. Amos
Bennett are grieved to learn of
the serious illness of their young
son Arthur, who was injured sev
eral weeks ago while playing foot
ball. He sustained a fractured rib
and complications resulted, which
have caused his condition to be
serious for the past three weeks.
B.Y.P.U. MEETING IS
SET AT BREVARD
PISGAH FOREST. Nov. 17 —
(Special).—Lower district B. V.
P. U. quarterly meeting will it?
held at the Baptist church here
Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock,
main feature of the program be
ing; an address by the Rev. Paul
Hartsell, pastor Brevard Baptist
church, on the "every member
canvass."
who is in the Patton Memorial
hospital, are sorry to learn of her
slow improvement.
Mr. C. A. Lawing, of Forest
City, was the overnight guest of
his" sister, Mrs. Pierce' Williamson,
recently.
Mrs. D. E. Blythe and Mr. and
Mrs. Raymond Foster, of Spartan
burg. visited Mrs. S. M. McCall
Sunday.
Mrs. Fair Wagner, of the Dana
road, visited her mother, Mrs. S.
M. McCall, Sunday. .
H. C. McCall visited Johnnie
Cagle who is seriously ill at his
home at Upward.
Billie Holbert, of Big Hungry,
is visiting his sister, Mrs. Howell
Henderson, of this place.
ALLEY" OOP
By HAMLIN
/THE GIANT'S OUT COLO \
AN' STILL; TH1 GRAND VJIZER
HAS A NERVOUS CHILL— >
THE KING IS MAD UP
TO HIS EARS -FROM LISTEN
ING TO HIS SUBJECTS' CHEERS.'
S His PLOT TO PUT OUR PAL
V AVJAiV VIENT FOOEV, /
. \ Atf OOP'S TH* HEROW
, OF TH', S
DA^/y
I ' * A
/ YER SWELL PLOT TO GET OOP BUMPED \ L^Boy
OFF,WITHOUT TH'PEOPLE GETT1N' VIISE.WAS ] V- o\\S °Tr*
A BUST/ LOOK a THAT/ BARE-HANDED, HE / 1V wotta r •
.....—— — — —' / r sock•
KNOCKED VER GIANT SILLY/ NOVJ HE'S A
BIGGER HERO THAN EVER?
m<i
fW VJE'LL BE LUCKY IF THEY DON'T ^
RUN US CLEAN OUT'A TH' COUNTRY,
AN' SET ALLEY OOP UPAS KING! r4
. WOTTA FINE GRAND WIZER
YOU TURNED OUT
LT0
BEHIND THE SCENES IN
WASUhJGTQll
W m m
BY RODNEY DUTCHER I
WEA'Service Staff Correspondent I
rprASHINGTON—"Best minds"
of the administration at last,
have thawed to the point where j
they'li give their honest views on
progress of the national recovery
program. Here's the way they
ei26 it up
BUSINESS — Recent recessions
nothing to he (tyscouraged ahout.
•^Tiall month-to-month fluctua-j
tions not as significant as genera^
trend Previous improvement!
was so rapid that a slowing up
was to be expected. Exports I
show a striking increase of CO per
cent over tha low of the first three
months of the year Chief worry1
factor in recessions, aside from
possibility they will continue, is
me chance that public will take
them too seriously and become
alarmed
GOLD PURCHASE-Few presi
dential advisers can see it. except
as dubious psychological expedient
which should do no harm
CAPITAL GOODS — Little hap
pening to this vitally essential and
stricken market so far except lot
of smoke and talk Aside from
public works, whose net effect can't
> ?)•» forecast, bir;ges» hope for this'
V.arket is Russia, which wants to
I'ui1 machinery Machinery manu
facturers a-c /.jwerful brcker.« of
ecognition.
NRA—Hurly-burly giving way to
normality Publicity likely to veer
u> sericulture an«' liiuor with
Ford case a Ins'
Of
NRA settling <l v t,
as regular p;.r: -.[ n r. . 1
system, mercifu
tionnl period, • .^1
straighten out «
cated points aim . 1 j 7
AGHICULTl i ( _ —
remember i! . ' . j
boosted pri<< '
{arm prices i
new wage —.
reached and feUtjJ
static.
NHA will no
third jump, >
program will ta' -n nanv'n.
price parity
Chief effects <t ;>1:, ,)r ^
AAA ,iro,,: I
ami r«!) k:k' <1. . 'uiqH
as necessary n • ■\J:> farm*^
1
II
and reallege nuiii think<
look is rather
pRESIOF.N i ii KVELT.
*• hear him » it. often Ren*
of the IV.' i v.';.-k>rJ
news from ih- • tm
*1 just V;no\v <.!i»t ! read,"
frequently ' • 'i a
when ques? ioi 1 iu
ministratoi ' . n\- latest
with Henry 1
THK presid:' < ,r.to|iaUoo J
the anni
had his pbysi(; . . I
n,ei"' '''' lMfe so*|
timej* w 'I 11 ■ v. their ir, ■
slings *ftet "■
handsi.akiiu
- THIS CURIOUS WORLD -
T€RMIT£ QUEENS
MAY LIVE TO THE AjE
of f/fTSSA/
AND LAY MORE THAN
/oo, 000,000
^GG5/
MALE AUSTRALIAN
MONITOR LIZARDS
STANO UPON THEIR. HIND LEGS ANC
W&SS7LE: FOR THE POSSESSION
OF A MATE..
ooo
•EL€P{4ANT TUSKS
WERE aOU&HT ANNl'AU.Y F0R
VEAR& By ONB LONDON F'GM,
FOR THE PURPOSE C? /'AKN&
3/LL/A/<D BALIS.
>*" ' ^ 0 IMS Br mi SCnviCC ipic
r» HE SUPPLY of ivory is swiftly dwindling, and the r.stouriit,
thing is that it lias been able to last this long:. The fcfsi rcr
comes from the tusks of the African elephant, it bcii r prefsrab!
to that of the Indian elephant. Walrus and hippopotamus tort
furnish a small quantity. Not so many years ago, a hundred to:
of ivnrv werp handled annually by London dealers
In the Theater
HORIZONTAL
I Who Is the
man of the
theater in tlij
picture?
11 Sun god.
13 He Is ac
claimed one of
America's
finest s.
14 Command.
15 Lad.
16 Put on shoes.
17 Cer.us of
slugs.
L? Manufactured.
Hawaiian
bird.
20 Transmitter.
21 Spcck.
22 Like.
23 He is the
of numerous
plays.
25 Exists.
27 Contraltos.
23 Exclamation
of inquiry.
29 Higher.
II Road fabbv.).
12 Second note.
J3 Rubber trees.
U Oae of the
most famous
Answer to Previous Puzzle
songs was
his, "Over
There."
35 Senior (abbr.).
36 Ilod.
37 To challenge.
38 What street
does he cele
brate in play
and song?
42 Happens well
or ill.
43 Gaseous
element.
44 Lubricant.
45 Tuning
devices.
46 Devoured.
47 Encountered.
4S Residues Iett
after press."..*,
grapes.
49 Postscript.
50 What adjective
describes h<*
pictured n u>'
51 Paid publicity
VERTICAL
1 Chandeliers
(variant).
2 Repetition of
sound.
3 Indian.
4 Wands>
5 Grain tabbiO
6 Caustic.
7 Weeps.
S Smell.
9 Fowl.
I# Measure ct
area.
11 Houn^-uy
12 Yes.
15 * ,.;uids
i>aTl:in& ,
17 Variant of*
1 Knpine.
:i silent If'"14
23 Lane,
j 4 \i-i.ie atr.ew
nor-e'.'?
• * -rj pac'O
30 Pertal«W|
the oar.
.'{1 I.^s ct'O®*
... d;st
36 Ridicule*
j.rotessi'jn*
-—r.
]."•*£» of
40 i'pO!l
i A Rent.
4 j To roll
4: To
45 Fish.
4- Myself
4$ Mountain
«:ibbr '-j
.Tin

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