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The times-news. (Hendersonville, N.C.) 1927-current, November 17, 1933, Image 5

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Times-News
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' - ' n.e, 20c and J
.• a\ : 30c and 16c |,
I
FOR SALE
and Accessories
f;L3 PRE STONE OR G.P.
p M i-< ity Tire Co. *
-Foodstuffs
|HITS' NUTS: New crop.
i butternuts.!
is ... ! rand Fruit Cakej
Gem City Nut
pot. * J
BLS No. 2 meal, 10 lbs |
35c. * !
(
FRYERS 21c, hens
- 19c. Star
' • i" >horty's Bar
Gve* " \.. '.r highway.
t-Transportation
PG FOR FLORIDA about I
Want..: passenger!
car. av>: with driving.1
t:ces. Call I
|2—Mi seel lan ecus
-E—Three-Gallon electric!
: v. vv.ue '•vest. •'
"• * OIL STOVE]
• capacity oil
• new, real'
ci Mr. Howell. Depot:
orv )
|£ ARE HERE. Again
t-at u'.\ radio values.
N-. " • anil up. Small
s* v%n. Brunaon Fur-i
Company. *
pOAL BILL ONE-THIRD
f iti ng heater—
a c n.-tructed. Priced!
: . Brun:>on Fur
Coaspanv. *
| .J ELS At water \
ad p.< \ radios before
M,i-( :ty Tire Co. *{
'OR RENT
4— Apartments
■NT — Two nice apart
rooms each. 305
•*enue oast.
WANTED
17—Farms
;ACRF. FARM. 2 1-2
town, large house,
his, city phone,
k' cultivation. Phone
''-Real Estate 1
—Littinyi on some
r. xses and/ small
G. I.. Anders
f.' koom 4, American
Bid-.
Miscellaneous
° '■ Married couple
r • and keep
and water only
! »• 111 -J.
V°L'> F ARMER want*
Twenty acres
cultivation with
; i> stock and
::>7.
,f) HUV used *tOTes,
• also used
'a-okson's, 733 7th
j and Found
P ersonal Property
' 4d rob*; Owner get
wl. • Stevenson, Druid
ft
I ih'.h*nd *"T slove on
N fuUer" Hodge"el1
/ THERE VA GO.r
A DAY OF HARD
WORK, GlTT'M A
BAG OF CHESTNUTS,
AM' VA GO AN'
GIVE 'EM TO AGIRL
\ T NEV£R WAS
SUCH A 'SAP,
SrV EVEN AT YOUR
>~?)\ AGE.
NO? WELL, I'M
A SAP WHEN
I'M YOUNG,,
AN' At NT GOT
MUCH —- YOU'L
BE A SA P WHEN
YOURE OLD, ASJ'
GOT A LOTS. y
v THE. FELLER I SEE. \
\ HANQN' £\ROUND -VA?. 1
] pust office. was tall
/ AND SKINNY-'BO'JT SIX
' FEET- WITH A 7>-ACK
BEAPD—I'D SAY/BOUT^.
V THIRTY
OUT OUR WAY
By Williams
11-17
r 193". EC NEA SE7VICr. INC
I MC. U. s. PAT Off.
IT WORKS THAT WAV.
THE NEWFANGLES (Mom'n Pop)
■By Cowan
SO YOU THINK
rou GOT AN \DEA.
WHO TRIE" TH" KiDNAPIN',
' EH? V/EL'-,l NEED
A. DISCRETION
OF
THE MAN I FlGUPE DONE IT ) WHO'S THE
WAS SHORT AND FAT, NOT j MIDDLE-SIZED
MOPE THAN EWE FEET-- J FELLER W»TH
SMOOTH-SHAu'CN-SANDY- / THE SUCK CLOTKE5J
HAIR AND 'BOUT F\FTY / I SEEN ABOUND
YEA.PS OLD
here? he
LOOKED /
/ WHEEL
\S WITHIN a
•A WHEEL-DA
isL^AGlT IT
?
LETS SEE,NOW— \ PUT DOWN,
RFWA.RD, DEAD OR >> FEET TALL,
ALIVE-A MAM BETWEENJ AND DARK
TWENTY-EIGHT AND
FIFTY YEARS /
OLD
-B1Wa.tr
oead ep: /vuvE
MAN riT/N' -JV£
FOLlEKN {MSCSiPTFdKi
TvWFNTY-FlVJE ToflfTr
YEAR 5 OLD - ElTHK SIK I
FEET TALL AN' PACK. EC
FAT AND NOT MORE'W |
FNF FEET HIGH-WE •
MtGMT HAUE A BtAPD. '
rp A SMALL MUS7AS«on|
UPPER UP-LAST SEEN \ III
,M AlH&CK.tR UGiTT \{ll;l
-r.pAY COAT- notefv
I ccttsrABLZUfoctotw*
TUET OBTEPI
GIT HIM,
HP
t *
BEG. U. S. PAT. orr.
^ © 1933 BY HEA.SiSVICE. INC. cn
Special Notices
WILL EXCHANGE Buick sedan
in A-l condition for Laborers'i
Building & Loan stock. See;
Jimmie Mitchell, Hendeison1
Chevrolet Company.
AMAZING LAMP VALUES now
on display. Bridge, floor and
table lamps. See Brunson Fur-;
niture Company window. j
NEW 1934 PHILCOS arc here.'
See this master stroke of radio j
engineering. A price for every j
purse. Small payment down i
Brunson Furniture Company.* j
BE SAFE, insist on genuine Mor
ton's Smoke salt and sausage,
seasoning. Shelton & Kin?.'
Fourth avenue east.
BUILDING MATERIAL for that
new building or for those re-,
pairs can be found at Rigby
Morrow plant on Fourth Ave.
East. Dhone 97. * i
RADIO service, batteries and
and tubes. Midcity Tire Co.,
DEPENDABLE—Freeze Drug Co
carrying complete line of drugs
and drug sundries. Prescrip
tions carefully compounded.'
Phone 122. Immediate delivery. >
4
FRESH killed Henderson county
meat at Star Market. Try it;
once and be convinced. Next to j
Shorty's Barbecue. Greenville'
highway.
TRY McBRADY'S famous Beauty
Cake; unexcelled for face and
hands. Mrs. Vroman. 2C1-W.
NSWERS
l .vjjst*
Jji _ J -.HO*
^ KO
hbdayS
J!EL
GUESS
WlMOOkA
\ «««
• .1 • SPOBf I
SOUTH KltN CROSS is the
name o»' tin? i>1;:ti•' Winookn
is a highly touted RACK
HOKSK The iblund indicated
is CEYLON.
Turn U. S. Guns on Touhy Gang
: a."*, a—g ———
"Spearhead" of the federal drive on kidnapers, Joseph B. Keenan,
assistant U. S. attorney general, is pictured, left, with George Sulli
van. U. S. district attorney, in the St. Faul courtroom where the two
are demanding life terms for Roger Touhy, Chicago gangster, and
three a.des on trial for the kidnaping of William Hamm, wealthy
brewer.
FRECKLES AND HIS FRIENDS
EffsASM SCOOPS UP KWSSIOM'S kICK-CFF AMD
UAMtfEBS WIS WAY BACK TO.SWADYSIDE'S
FORTY-YARD STg|?g ...
ATTA )
BoY. /
CRASH1
. Eager it>
VINDICATE
h'IMSELF,
freckles
ASKS FOR
7W£ BALI.
OSJ 1UE
NEXT
PL AY....
BITM)
By Laura Lou
BROOKMAN.
= C '.9J? «> SOMCC H-C —rt.
BEGIN HERE TODAY |
Cn a stormy November evening |
David Bannister meets a prettj j
blond girl and offers her a lift in
the cab in which he is riding, j
Her handbag opens and he sees
a. revolver inside.
Ne::t morning Eannister reads]
that Tracy King, orchestra leader
in a theatre, ha3 been found
dead in his apartment. Police
are searching for an "unknown
blond'1 who visited King the night
before. Bannister, remembering
the girl in the taxicab, is puzzled.
Hc sees her again that morn
ing. The girl telis him her name
is Juliet France and that she
krows nothing of the murder.
He goes to see his old friend,
Jim Paxton, editor of the Tre
mont Post, and arranges to work
on the King murder case for the
Post. Bannister and J. Randolph
Gainey, star reporter go to police;
headquarters. They learn that
Herman Scurlach, unemployed, is j
in jail, accused of writing aj
threating letter to King.
Bannister decides to take a
look at the room where King died 1
and leaves. On the way he stops j
'o see Juliet France. He is in
formed that she has left the ho-1
tel.
NOW GO ON WITH THE STORY
CHAPTER VIII
Bannister repeated, in a tone
Ql' disbelief, "Checked out? You
mean she's gone? But there must!
bc-^" j
''Miss France checked out of1
the hotel early this afternoon," j
the voice over the wire told him;
crisply.
Bannister heard the click that
meant that the telephone call hadi
been disconnected. He put down
the instrument he hid been hold
ing, stared at it rather stupidly |
for an instant and then turned
away. He walked slowly across
the lobby toward the door.
1 >ut he had not taken a dozen
steps before he was back. He said
to the room clerk. "I understand
that Miss France has left the ho-1
tel. Po you know if she left a:
message for me? My name is
Bannister—"
The room clerk turned. "I see, I
sir," he said and began sorting
through a collection of envelopes.
A moment iater he shook his J
head. "There's no message," he,
said.
"And she didn't leave a for-J
warding address?" Bannister per
sisted. He knew, even as he ask
ed, that she hadn't. Juliet
France had gone away from the
Hotel Tremont because she did
not want anyone to be able to
find her. Evidently she hadn't
trusted him. hadn't believed him
when he said he would try to
heli) her.
Or did this disappearance have
an entirely different meaning?
Did it mean that the story the
girl had told him that morning
was a tangle of lies, made out of
whole cloth to appeal to his sym
pathy? Did it mean she was a
clever adventuress?
"No, there's no forwarding ad
dress," the clerk said briefly.
Bannister thanked him. turned
back toward the door. This time
he went out to the street, hailed
a taxi and told the driver to take
him to the Shelby Arms.
He felt rather as though he had
dived from a high spring-board
and landed flat. The more he
thought of it the more he was
convinced that the girl had used
him to suit her purpose—and how
well she had done it, too!—then
artfully gone her way. What
those purposes were, what part
lie had played in them, Bannister
could not guess. Of course her
story about going to see Tracy
King to ask for a job was ridicul
ous on the face of it. So was her
explanation about the revolver.
I And she had said she had no
! friends and was so terrified of
, i he police and the tears had core
into her eyes!
' * * *
Bannister muttered, "Damn!"
; and drew his brows together. He
' had forgotten that he; had gone
I into this thinjr to help Juliet
France, t hat his visit to Jim Pax
ton's office and the sudden, im
promptu suggestion that he
should go to work for the Post
had all come about because of
the girl. He wanted to know now,
more than ever, who Juliet
[France was. He wanted to know
[ whether or not she had killed
[Tracy King—and if so, why.
The cab slowed and came to a
j halt. Bannister got out. paid the
; driver and walked slowly up the
'.•■■top?. For an instant lie had a
j vision of a slender, green-clad
I figure silhouetted against that
entrance—a figure that drew
back from the stormy night, then
darted into it. But the vision was
cone almost as quickly as it had
come.
Bannister pulled the heavy door
open and stepped inside. He was
in a larjve. oblong entrance, car
peted and furnished almost like a
room in an impressive private
home. Chairs, a divan and tables
were arranged with taste. He no
ticed a tapestrv that he did not
like and a tall vase of bronze
I chrysanthemums placed before a
| mirror. The only detail that was
i unlike a home was the hotel desk
at the rear. A man stood there.
A little at his left sat the switch
board operator and as Bannister I
moved forward he heard the op
eiator's softly slurred, "Whatl
number are you calling?"
Bannister addressed the clerk.
"Aie you Mr. Link?" he asked.
"My name is Bannister and l\e a]
note here from Chief Henley—"i
A swift change of expression—
was it alarm or something strong
er?—came over the rlerk's face.1
"Yes I'm Mr. f ink," he admitted.
"You say Chief Henley sent
you?"
Bannister presented the envelope
containing the note. It had been;
scrawled with a pen and wa^
nothing more than a request that i
Mr. Bannister, the bearer, be per
mitted to see the rooms Tracy
Kinj;- had occupied in the hotel.
"Why — why, yes, certainly,"
the clerk agreed quickly. "I'll
take vou up myself. If you'll
just wait a moment while I fc-et
someone to take charge of the
desk—"
He disappeared. The telephone j
operator, a pretty girl whose'
Irish anccstry was unmistakable,!
had been watching Bannister with
open interest. Now she kept her
eyes averted, became elaborately
preoccupied with her switch
board.
"Doesn't want to talk," Ban
nister decided. He turnd his
back on her and continued to in
spect the large room.
Link was back shortly, a
younger man beside him. The
newcomer stepped behind the
desk. Link said, "Now Mr. Ban
nister—" in the tone he might
have used with a prospective ho
tel tenant, and led the way to
the elevator.
Neither spoke during the ascent.
Bannister thought that the uni
formed vouth who operated the
elevator displayed considerable
interest as they stepped out on
the third floor and that he
lingered to see which direction
they would take. Then the slid
ing door closed and the elevator
was on its way.
Side by side the two men moved
down the corridor. Evidently Mr.
Link was not overly experienced
in the ways of police departments
and detectives. "You're a special
investigator, are you? Mr. Ban
nister?" he asked "Is that why
you're here?"
Bannister said, "yes" and felt
that he was not misrepresenting
the facts.
"It's a terrible thing — Mr.
King's death," the hotel clerk
went on. "Nothing like it has
ever happened since I've been
here. It's been a shock to every
one—the guests, the help, every
one! They all knew Mr. King.
He was always so pleasant. Such
a fine looking young man—.
"It was you who found him,
wasn't it?" Bannister asked.
"Yes. Mr. Drugan and I. He
didn't come back to the theater
ami Mr. Drugan came to find out
what was the matter. When he
knocked and couldn't get an an
swer lie came downstairs and we
went back together."
"I suppose the police are sure
it couldn't have been suicide?"
"Oh, impossible! The coroner
said that was out of the question
because there were no powder
burns—and then there wasn't any
Igun. No. it couldn't have been
jsuuicide. Besides Mr. King had
no reason to do such a tiling!"
"I wonder," said Bannister. A
1 moment later he asked, "Isn't
[there anyone from headquarter!*
[here now?"
"Not now," Link said with a
shake of his head. "There were
half a dozen hers last night. The
Chief, too. This morning there
were two men—detectives—out,
asking questions of the servants
and some of the tenants. I'm
afraid they didn't learn much. If
thev would only find that, wo
man—"
j His words broke off as he turned
the key in the lock. The door
swung open.
Hannister saw a living room,
longer than it was wide, with
three windows at the end. There
was an attractive dark rug on
the floor, attractive, figured
draperies at the windows. Aside
from these details the room was
completely in disorder. A desk,
standing before the window ha 1
been rifled. Chairs were at all
angles, one of them upturned.
Pillows from the davenport had
I fallen to the floor. Dirt had
I been trampled into the carpet
and there were several places
where ashes had been spilled.
"We haven't done anything to
the rooms at all," Link was quick
to explain. "Everything is just as
they left it last, night. CaDtain
McNeal said they weren't to bo
touched. I locked the door my
self and it hasn't been opened
since."
I'annister considered the wreck
age before him. That was to be
expected, of course. The photo
graphs at headquarters would
Rive a record of the appearance
of the room exactly as it had
been when King's body was
found. The disorder indicated
that the search of tfie apartment
had been most thorough. No
chance that Henley's men had
missed anything.
"Tn there," said Link, "is where
we found him. In the bed room."
A boyish voice called from the?
corridor. "Oh, Mr. Link! Mr. I
Link!"
The dark turned. "Excuse me,"
he said, "I'll have to see what
they want. I !1 be back in a mo
ment—"
Bannister nodded. He heard
the door close behind him as he
moved forward, halting in the en-|
trance to the bedroom.
It was smaller than the other
room and it. too, had been com
pletely disordered. A dark, brown
ish stain on the gray carpet told
its unmistakable story. Bannister
k'ylt to inspect the stain.
Even before he heard a sound
he was aware of the presence be
hind him. There was no time for
action. Cold perspiration stood
on Bannister's forehead; he
would have turned but he could
not. Then something landed on
his back.
(To be continued.)
NATIONAL ANTHEMS j
BLAMED FOR WARS
NEW YORK. Nov. 17. (UP).!
National anthems, including "The
Star Spangled Banner," are'
teaching men of the world to kill'
and destroy each other, and!
therefore should be abolished, D.\ ;
Arthur Cromin, director of the I
New York schools of music, told
the American Creative League of
Music Students in session here.
"The world today," said Dr.
Cremin, "is under the influence
of a type of music, military and
sexual, which menaces the har
mony of millions of individuals
and the peace of nations.
"The whole world today is
ready to kill and destroy under
the influence of military music.
Any music that inspires feelings
for intense nationalism, feelings
of possession and boundaries like
I he American 'Star Spangled
Banner,' the French 'Marseillaise,'
the English 'God Save the King,'
and the Italian royal march, must
be condemned."
Dr. Cremin suggested that in
stead of the many national an
thems one international anthem
be written, by a group of inter
national composers, to be sung in
every country on state occasions.
HAIRLESS SQUIRREL
VERSAILLES. Mo. (UP).—A
hairless squirrel was displayed
here recently. The animal, killed
by a hunter, was hairless from
the tip of its nose to the end of
its tail.
NOTICE OF SALE
In accordance with the provisions of the North Carolina Code of
Chapter 5, Article 3, Paragraph 218 (C), Subsection 7, the
undersigned will on the 21st day of November, 1933, at 11 o'clock
at the courthouse door of Henderson County, in the City of Hender
sonville, and the State of North Carolina, offer for sale and sell as a
whole or separately to the highest bidder for cash, subject to the
approval of the Judge of the Superior Court of the Eighteenth
Judicial District, the following described notes, securities and judg
ments, being the property of the AMERICAN BANK AND TRUST
CO-MP ANY of Hendersonville, N. C., the said noteR being subject to
all equities which may be plead against the said American Bank L
Trust Company Right reserved to reject any or all bids:
NEGOTIABLE NOTES:
Maker Collateral or Endorter Principal Amount
F. L. Blank $ 423.08
J. 1!. Brookshire 96.04
AAA AA
J. B. Brookshire
Mamie Louise Bush
200.00
16.49
Cinderella Boot Shoppe—Geo. Cooley, Sam Cooley, Fred
F. Cooley. Secured by I)-T covering three tracts
ol' land in Hyman Heights 225.00
Cinderella Boot Shoppe—Chattel Mtg. covering furniture
and fixtures 304.39
W. L. Gibbs—B. F. Gibbs ^ . 200.00
Chester K. Glenn—S. H. Hudgins, Jay Allen Glenn 2,165.00
C. W. Harty—Mrs. C. W. Harty 100.00
Hendersonville Investment Co.—Note for 25.00 signed by
J. M. Shepherd; Note for $400.00 secured by D-T
signed by Lawrence J. Pace; Note for $120.00
secured by D-T signed by R. T. Long; Note for
$85.75 signed by B. L. Foster; Note for $540.00
signed by Bruce Drysdale and Geo. Wing, Jr.,
secured by I)-T on lot No. 4 on King1 Street; Two
notes of $375.00 each signed by Heiidersonville
Investmeat Co., secured by D-T on lot No. 5 on
King. Street ... 1,899.66
Cha.x. E. Holland—5 shares Hendersonville Investment Co.
stock __ 200.00
S. H. Hudgins—Real Estate Trust Deed note for $1,000.00 1,000.00
S. H. Hudgins _ — 370.10
S. II. Hudgins—Chattel Mtg. covering furniture & fixtures
bought from Bellevue Apartment 3,500.00
B. B. .Jackson __ . 245.00
F. A. P. Jones—Note of W. E. Love for $175.00 150.00
F. H. Lewis—Ctf. No. 1 for 1 share capital stock Reaben
Tire Company, Inc. 50.00
McKinley McCraw 118.00
H. C. Mardis 150.00
Osceola Lake Company 1,754.11
Lawrence J. Pace—50 shares Citizens Finance Co. stock2.995.48
E. J. Rhode? 1,845.00
J. Earl Robertson 136.00
J. W. Rutherford 79.54
A. D. Staton—Secured by D-T 4,375.00
C. S. Staton— Secured by D-T 4,374.78
I W. W. Walker -- 1,350.00
I W. W. Walker—5 shares First Bank & Trust Co. stock 750.00
I Mary Sue Whitaker—J. C. Whitaker 5.00
, Louis C. Williams—5 shares H'ville Investment Co. stock 70.00
Louis C. Williams 109.63
Louis C. Williams 550.00
JUDGMENTS
Defendants Principal Amount
I E. S. Browning
Marie R. Lane
, Claude M. Pace
A. S. Browning. Jr. $ 99.51
, Mrs. T. A. Allen
IT. A. Allen - — 1?0.00
IArthos Apostal 17.00
W. B. Arledge - 47.88
C. N. Baldwin
I Claudia Baldwin __ - - 50.00
| F. L. Blank - 155.87
I Cooley Bros. __ . — 299.73
I B. A. Dermid
j J. M. Dermid — 44.24
I B. F. Gibbs — 75.00
B. F. Gibbs
S. H. Hudgins --- 918.97
Allen W. Hawkins __ 31.00
J. P. Hollingsworth 16.00
Mrs. Blaine Jackson _ — 92.00
Donald E.Jones ) __ 38.94
S. L. Jones )
W. Mack Jones, Adm. Estate J. J. Slattery... 40.00
Elizabeth Leach, Admx. Estate of Emma L. Doyle 124.30
Amos Ma.vnard
.T. Willis Bayne 93.11
W. G. McCall 50.00
Rachel McCullough - 30.00
O. P. Smith . 149.64
O. P. Smith -- 21.50
C. S. Staton
N. B. Featherstone 150.00
Lillie S. Williams _ - 175.00
V. B. Bowers, Jr. _ 500.00
B. L. Foster -
W. L. Gibbs . Ufi'S
C. R. Glenn aHa'aa
Hendersonville Investment Co. — 16,900.00
Ruth McDaniel — JMJ.OO
Lawrence J. Pace PAT" kImZEY,
Liquidating Agent, American Bank & Trust Co., &
Hendersonville, N. -d ... ,
This the 8th day of November. 1933. NfrrJ'lO.ll/tt.g^
FUMBLE/
\ /-vrO> C>
wtc.
—By Bktsser j
CLEAN FOOTBALLS
r I^HE rules state that a lineman pay mike
A use of his arms,if he keeps his harvk to
gether; if he does this he may legally uie the pro
jecting parts of his arms on offense.
This rule gives the linemen a great many op
portunities for poor sportsmanship. The accom
panying sketch shows why.
I !erc the offensive lineman t!t left is attend
ing to throw his opponent backward. His hands
are joined together, which is intended to mislead
the referee, but his arms are NOT dose to (m j
Udy. He has thrown them out and up, caching
his opponent under the chin and idhumg a
blow that ran break the defensive lineman's neck.
Officials cannot be loo ffairtjoodiilptrf 1
[ layer. The penalty of half the <fotance to the
goal line is hardly stiff enough.

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