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The times-news. [volume] (Hendersonville, N.C.) 1927-current, December 29, 1933, Image 5

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Times-News .
V Ad Kates
-Caih n Advance)
t * 'lis Mze type, )
„ ' t ion; ha'' price
nt insertions.
I !
V., - »
I . —$1 a line (this
; minimum of Ave
; :1 w.^rJ this size type j •
,r • ' insertion, half j,
.:o r subsequent in
l d for type this
I first insertion:
jjf price for each ac-cJi
Aitt! consecutive inser
fv • :m oharce. 25c.
4SMFIF.D DISPLAY RATE
60c per inch
far' ' Thanka and Trib
^ ,? :: speci are accepted at
, j word.
p0 - a*k for information
u "keyed" ads, as they
,st::c''y confidential.
e " made. The Time«
!- responsible for only
, n o-ect insertion. The
- r > responsible for sub
h ertion*. 'Ihe adver
| notify immediately
r.y c rrections needed.
•da "ikon over
I
War.t s 1 department close*
B00n -sification posi
- - be suaranteei
fer thu: hwr.
Kan - always cash in
-o business men
having accounts
B rspaptr. When
H -.-ired the rate
j: . 5c per line, 20c and
u . Oc and 16c
I -
I
FOH SALE
I
L ck and Poultry
j
Tuesday. Hood miik
20. Gray l». Hamp
!2—Miscellaneous
t. Y-AR SAL'-- At
•\ .. VS StilV.
DUCKS for salt'.
[fi-:- A young sroV)d tow. j
pise's, heifers or;
Two young mules
years old. wagon
: h.i ness for trade or
it. Mrs. K. M. Kade% |
.
sack and 25
_ neal o2e at Gibbs". |
: . ; s week.
EssS Let No. 1 S3.95. lot I
P . • lot No. 3 i
i. All evening"
t" -'ss dresses £7.50 and
ENXIE BOWEX'S. V
FOR RENT
11—Apartments
- —-4— ,
RENT—Two story house
'' Heat, garage, a
plr.ee $1:i.OO Vv
1. ti. Love, i'hone 27.
WANTED
—To Scii or Rent
«■- - to,t jvc-.; hat :n ihop
Soft ha:< arid
- 7 io v . J KXXI'.
. AK\>.
Special Notices
I-. ■ ' Every ceat in the shop
k- v if.:Lit ,i. i'.jos rang
n v'■ > ' 22.50. -JKX
BOWEN'S. *
® N FRIENDS and customers'
^ al! a .M . i \ ('hr>' na<
a Ha; Xew Yea!,
(iroctiy.
'J1 n You to stand by f°r
Chevrolet. What a.
• "0 act it. . fn»ru wheel;,
j, more roont, mqre
•ate: t-cnut^y. What

C 3 ,D ENDS: Few 5.95
■•r" sets at HV'a
T'vo 3-piece knit
JKXXIK COW

ffbraskans Ask
pfA To Finance
irriRation Plan
Take $44,000,000
ilize Agricultural
; mpire Dream
^~1N(;S. Neb.. Dec. 29.—I
: a J of a great in
ictil J re empire, a region
hlc.«..< productive capacity,
-f.i iM'oiiont*nts of
-a*s great Tri-County de
projfet now .seeking
"val of tho public works
a'.ion at Washington.
f ' >>' XVhra.-ka ad
[. I :ii works, a|>
1 «• 'It '• "pmeni di>-:
• >> . te}y $-1-1,000,- J
•ini; for develop
ing dream arc now be
• lent official,-.
scheme of conservation
By Williams
I CFFtH WJ3H THAT!
1 OFPEN FIND MYSELF
WISH IN' THEY'L? FIND
US LAY1N' ALONG HERE, \
FROZE " O DEATH/ GOME
DAY THEN THEY'D CUT
OUY THIS SCHOOL BUSINESS
CM D^YS LIKE THIS. >
WELL,IT WOULDN'T
00 US AMY GCOD,
SO DON7 INCLUDE
ME IN YOUR WISHES.
-By Cowan
yep, I GOT
SOKE sJUNV<
FEP. CWV1STMAS
1 WOULDN'T feZ
SEEK \N
1 KM SYMPA"TWOX WITH I
YP\.£t>-MY YOKEMATE IS >
ALWfAVS GlVlN' t'.E PRESENTS
I WOULDN'T WEPsP TO y
A DOG t-tftfT v
v :-fc Wj THAT'S A V IT'S A YULE TtDE SPAND,
PAPE.OlD WEED YOU'RE \ MY YSI.7E GAWE ME FOP
TrIAP.CONSTABLE,' ) CHP;STMAS_YEW LL
WrtAT bPAHD IS iT° y WAVE T'PUV *JP WYTH
^ "Tl'-L. 1 GET 'EM ALi
r*r£\: ••• ... ct^^mdked
i>. \mv.eel *
WHIM ^ WHECL
Pk-YA-GIT IT
DA YA MEW), L A\MT
^ SOUIMT AT
«' TIE. \
YEAH ^ WELL, I
DOfi'T SEE Vr'.ET
NOU GOT IT C.vi.
P\GHT MOW, DEr.C
\n*al.^s rep
uO^T M'.t ;D WEAP>N'
Ct.Z CHRISTMAS
PPESEMT MY W.FE
GWE ME >
REG U. S PAT. OFrJp 1933 LY NCA SC^VICi:. INC
Nab Disimger Suspect ^ind Bride
Accused a< a member ot the (temperate Dillinger bandit j'ang, a parolo
violator who turner tavern keeper and apparently wa^ going straight
v.'s captured by Chicago police, :\nd his reputed bride also h"!d for
questioning. Violei Barretta, loft, was a waitress in the tavern which
Hilton O. Crouch. 2i>. right, was operating when po?u-2 trailed hi>r
down, a month after their n-arriage. He i* vaid to have confessed
his part in the robbery of mn Indianapolis bank with the gug.
of the surface an*! sub-surface
waters of the Nebraska watershed
is represented in plans for the gi
gantic development.
The district, in addition to the
irrigation phase.;, proposes to
build hydroelectric units capable
of generating annually aopro.\i
rnately 225,000,000 kilowatt
hours of primary power. Crea
tion of a great supply Df power,
it is believed, will turn the vast
central section of Nebraska into
a partial industrial section in ad
dition to its alreauy well estab
lished agrarian character.
Hans call for the creation of
two lakes by construction of two
dams to impound unappropriated
waters of the North 1'latte river.
One dam. one and a half miles
long and 110 feet high, would im
pound 20f>,30() acre feet of water,
creating a lake more than 100
feet deep. The other <Uim, one
and three-quarter miles long and
130 feet high, would impound
300,000 acre feet of water in a
lake 130 feet deep.
In presenting the approved
plans to Washington officials, the
Nebraska advisory board pointed
out that the development "repie
scnts a v'sion in national plan
ning", not- only for today but to
I morrow."
Advertise it or you may
have to keep it.
FKECKLES AND HIS FRIENDS
" MEED ANY HELP? J \ KJO,THANKS
CAN GO :si7t> SWADVS.de \ 6ST OUT BY MYSELF—
>AMD HAVi= A MECHANIC J COULD USE A TOWUNE
BRING A TOWCAR y "yoU HAVE
OUT
ALL YOU HAVE TO DO IS
LOOP THE ROPE AROUND
THE. HUB AND TIE IT TO A
SPOKE. THEM; WITH THE
OTHER END OP THE ROPE
TIED TO A TREE, IT'S A
VERY SIMPLE.
YOU SEE....VJHEM "THE WHEEL
REVCLVES, THE ROPE WINDS UP
ON THE HUB, JUST ENOUGH TO
GIVE THE CAR MOMENTUM
THATS ALL I NEED f AND
AWAY L GO f
Q}
—By Diosser
COSH! X BET TVS j>JLY ^
THIMGS YOJ'D NE6Pr"T®
VJPECK A TPAlM,
SNOULD BS A HAIRPIN
AND AN IPSA !
D
\.U
REG. U. S. PAT. Off.
e I #33 BY NCA 6I«VIC£. INC.
"C
x x?A
Mississippi Solons
Face Battle On
Wet-Dry Issue
Measures to Legalize Beer.
Whiskey and Wines up
in January
JACKON, Miss., Doc. 29.—
! (UP).—Wet and dry forces in
avid Mississippi are preparing for
a vigorous fight during the regu
' lar session of the legislature,
which convenes .January 2. over
proposed legislation to legalize
' the «i!e of beer and permit re
! stricted distribution of whisky
and wines.
APPROVE BEER MEAURE
Majorities in both the house of
representatives and the senate
j have expressed their approval of
the beer masure. Governor M. S.
i Conner, although personally a
' dry, has intimated that ho will
! not oppose such legislation in
viev; of the accruing revenue
i which is needed to balance th^
i state's budget.
' The 1934-35 i'tate "executive
! budget'1 includes the suggestion
that beer be legalized, taxed one
cent, a nint, with a reasonable
privilege tax on dealers. The
jbudgeteers estimated that this
would yield $200,C)f0Q annually.
I Proposed legislation legalizing
hard liquors, however, will meet
'strong opposition. Politicians pre
; ferably are non-commital on the
[subject. Formerly, support of
I prohibition was an accepted plank
j in a candidate's platform. Such
i a strong wet sentiment has de
Mae West of
t, Patch
Hero i. the Texas gaiden variety
of Mae West, all decked out in
caba.re and rhubarb leaf cc.stunw.
What? Xo spinach? No, but
there's some parsley, just for gar
nish. and the ensemble, worn by
petty Mazie Stebbins of Wesla
co, Texas, won first prize in the
lower Rio Grands Valley vegeta
ble and style show.
veloped that a definite stt.nd on
either side of the question is cer
tain to alienate certain voters.
DODGED EY CANDIDATES
Because of this, officeholders,
scheduled to run in the August
primary, are desirous of blocking
a referendum measure that would
plate the question before the vot
ers eariv in lf>34.
Members of this group have in
dicated that if I: referendum is
voted, that they will favor post
poning it until August, 1D35.
Senator W. 15. Roberts and
Representative Walter Sillers
have drafted measures that would
repeal the state dry law and set
up a system of state dispensaries.
Bootlegdnff Of
Gold Is' Rivaling
Profits On Liquor
NEW YORK, Dec. 29.—(UP).
The bootlegging of gold threat
ens to replace the bootlegging of
liquor. An arrest has just been
made on the Canadian border,
which is believed to indicate that
gold smugglers recently have car
ried $1,000,000 worth of the pre
cious metal out of the United
States. The situation of the gold
prices'is unique in history, and
threatens to develop countless
bootleggers of the yellow metal
into foreign countries experts
j say.
Under the present law the as
i«ay offices and the mints cannot
pay more thnn S20.fi7 an ounce
for gold, while the RFC is buy
!ing gold daily for almost twice
ithis price, that is newly mined
i gold. Secondary golti recovered
! from old gold and scrap is not
purchased by the government at
; this higher price, and actually is
glutting the market. The gold in
both cases had exactly the same
purity and is "as good as gold."
But tootlegging this "secondard
gold" into foreign countries where
an open gold market exists, an
enormous profit is realized which
makes the old fashioned bootleg
ging of liquor seem trifling bv
; comparison.
IN REYNOLDS' OFFICE
1 IRK YARD, Dec. 20. (Special).
I Miss Mary Allison, graduate of
Brevard high school and Brevard
By Laura Lou
BPOOKMAfJ
f -r- TM•-» * Siftvu'i "*•
IO \ iDAA
UAVTD BANNISTER undcrJikM
40 find onl who killed TRACY
KING, orchestra leader. Bannister
Is nn nnthor and former newt
paper man. He work; on «Ue
murder case with GAINElf# star
reporter on the Post.
A in one those suspected are
JULIET FRANCE, blond, pretty
and known to have visited Kins:
shortly before his death!
MAN SCTJRLACH who wrote Kln«
a threatening letter: nnd JOE
PARROTT, down-and-out vaude
ville actor. It Is nlso known that
MELV1NA HOLLISTEB. middle
aged spinster, had quarreled with
King recently.
AI< DRUGAN. friend of King's,
l« found dead In n wrecked auto
mobile.
nnnnister persnndes the police
chief to let Juliet eonie to his
aunt's home, ostensibly ns a guest,
on the theory that if the girl be
lieves herself free they can learn
more about her.
llelvina Hollister Is found
strangled In the apnrtmcnt where
she lived with her brother, Mat
llicy. Iler death leaves him sole
heir to $150,000.
Juliet's sister nnd brother-in
law come to see her. They have
arranged with police for Juliet to
return home but she refuses to
Co. Later Juliet asks Rannlster If
he Is glad nhc Is staying. He
answers rather stiffly.
NOW GO OX WITH THE STOIIV.
CHAPTER XLIV
^ FEW hours earlier they had
talked In more friendly fashion
than ever before. Now that was
changed, and Juliet France thought
she knew the reason.
"Perhaps," she said quickly, "I
shouldn't stay. Perhaps it would
bo better if I didn't—"
"I'm sorry," Bannister apolo
gized. "I didn't mean what 1 said
to sound the way it did. I didn't
mean to be rude. It's only that it
might be easier for you if you went
with your sister and brother-in
law."
"I won't do that," she told him.
"I'll see this through to the finish."
There was silence for several mo
ments. Juliet leaned back, resting
one arm on the piano. She had
never looked lovelier and Ban
nister had never seemed less aware
of it.
"I don't know what Elbert told
you," the girl said slowly, "But I
do know him! I hope you don't
think I've done anything too fool
ish—"
"Not at all," he assured her.
But it wasn't the truth. He did
think she had been foolish. Out
rageously foolish. He couldn't for
the life of him understand how a
girl like Juliet France could let
herself become involved in a flirta
tion with Tracy King. Involved to
such an extent that she had been
the victim of blackmail. He couldn't
understand that and yet he knew
it was true.
"I'd like to tell you about it." she
said, "only 1 don't suppose it makes
any difference now."
No, of course, it didn't make any
difference. Not the slightest.
BaunLster said, "If 1 were you I
wouldn't think any more about it." 1
Her fingers touched the piano1
keya. She played a few notes ot
the oriental love song she had sung
one evening before. "Do you like
that?" sho asked.
"V«r7 much."
She played the melody, began
singing softly when she came to,
ihe chorus. When sho glanced
around again he was leading the l
Institute commercial class, has
accepted work in the office ot ,
I Senator Robert R. Reynolds, and j
: left this week to assume her I
duties in Washington.
! Two other graduates of Bre- •
vard Institute, Miss Paulette Gil-j
lespie and Miss Klsie James. al('i
also employed in the office of
Senator Reynolds.
MASONS HEAR NELSON
BREVARD, Dec. 29. (Special).
Jeff Nelson, lecturer for the
Grand Lodge of Masons, arrived
here Tuesday afternoon and has
Glenn Cunningham of th«
UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS If
one of the FASTEST RUNNERS
in the WORLD. GEORGE
GERSHWIN wrote the "Rhap
sody in Blue." The expeditior
headed by LINCOLN ELLS
WORTH plans to fly across the
pnnlinent r>f Antarctica
trenlng ne«ref*P«r. *PPfW«W oh-'
livioua to everything else.
"What'B In the paper?" she asked.
"Nothing much. They've had a |
bad storm on the east coast. And ,
another pair of movie stars are
getting a divorce."
Over the newspaper only the top
of Bannister's head was visible.
The girl waited for him to con
tinue, but he did not. Sudden y
she got to her feet.
"I think I'll go to my room." she
said, and disappeared.
• • • |
Bannister put down the news-:
paper and stared at the fire. He
thought. "I've made a mess of
everything. I don't know any more
about who killed Tracy King than
I did the day I heaid he'd been
murdered. I've wanted a lot of time
when I might have been doing
something else. What did I ever
get into this for?"
He knew the answer, though he j
refused to recognize it. He had
gone into it because he was inter
ested in Juliet France and because
he wanted to help her.
He looked across the room where
she had sat. Did she expect him to
listen to the songs she hac^ sung
to Tracy King? Well, he wouldn't!
"I suppose he told her they were
beautiful," Bannister thought scorn
fully. "I suppose he praised her
voice and paid her a lot of compli
ments."
Irritably he got to his feet and
walked to a window, looking out.
His aunt, coming into the room,
asked, "Where's Juliet?"
••I think she went upstairs."
Mrs. Hewlett pic'ked up her knit
ting basket. "Oh, dear," she com- j
plained. "I've lost those glasses
again—"
Her nephew paused in the door
way. "I'm going out," he said. "Be j
back in an hour or so." j
But it was later than that when
he returned. Head down, his coat (
collar turned up about his neck, j
Bannister strode along the dark, j
cold streets. He gave no thought j
to the direction be took, passed i
buildings without seeing them. j
He walked rapidly but the tor
meuting thoughts pursued him.
"You've made a fool of yourself.' j
they informed him. "You've pre
tended you were trying to solve a
murder when all the time it was ;
the girl you were interested in.
Well you know the truth about her i
at last. She's like the rest-vain,
silly, empty-headed. You let her;
flatter you by saying she'd read
your books, didn't you? How do
you know that she read them? She
probably flattered Tracy King. too.
Don't forget that! Why, you cuuldnt
be in love with a girl like that—"
• • •
tN love? Ah. but he was. Bannister
A knew ir now. He knew he had
been in love with her almost from
the tirst, only he had been too blind
io realize it. Because Adrle Allen ,
had hurt his pride he had believed j
himself broken-hearted. He nan
never loved Adele really. That vy»as j
clear to him. too. uow. Adele hart .
turned to Donald Quayle because J
Quayle was a famous star and bcinr
seen abrut with him would aid tier
in her film carcrr. Bannister, thus
left in the lurch, hart interpreted
lus bitterness as proof that Adele j
,vas the only woman he could ever j
•are for. What nonsense! lie had
jarcd no more 'or her really man (
she had caied for hi:n. !
No. he wasn't in io\e with A'.ele
[ler place nr.d t>ecr. taken t>> u j
slender girl with sfcungold uaii I
ami gray *bo sat at
the piano In the twilight and played
old-fashioned love, aongs. who d*
lighted In snow gtorms, and laughed
like a child.
"And a girl." the imps of torment
reminded him. "who carried on a
cheap afTair with Tracy King. \o\i ve
got to put her out of your mind.
You've got to forget her! If you
don't you'll only be sorry for it!"
When Bannister reached his aunt s
home the house was quiet and only
a single light was burning. He
fastened the door for the night and
went upstairs to his room.
At breakfast be and Juliet France
scarcely spoke to each other It
was the same durjng the evening
meal and again the next morning.
His aunt tried1 to question bim.
••David." she said, "aren't you feel
ing well?"
"Why. yes. I'm all right."
"Well you don't look it. And
you barely touchcd your food. Why
don't you stop in and see Doctor
Porter on your way down town.
"Aunt Kate, there's no reason for
me to see a doctor! I'm perfectly
all right. 1 tell you."
Kate Hewlett eyed him shrewdly.
"Well maybe. But if you don t eat
more this" evening I'll know some
thing's wrong."
• • •
Bannister left the house with
a new grievance. It was true be
didn't feel well. Ho hadn t slept
much the night bef&fe and the
thought of food was nauseating. If
Aunt Kate should take it into her
head that he was sick be knew
she'd pester him about it.
The world in general was a
wearisome shade of blue that morn
ing until Bannister strode into the
Hotel Tremont drug itore <o buy
some cigarets. He £a<t taken one
from the package' ana paused to
light it when a maq.lcaning against
the counter, caught bis eye.(
It was an instant before Ban
nister recognized him. Then he
stepped forward. "Good morning.
Mr. Hollister." he said. ,
Matthew Hollister turned. "Holla/4
he said. "Say-I'm glad to see yoa.
Let's see. your name is—?"
"Bannister. David Bannister."
"That's right. I remember dow.
I'm glad to see you. Mr. Bannister.
Have a cigar."
"No, thanks. I think 111 finish
this cigaret." .
"Take it!" Hollister urged, hold
ing out the cigar. "Put tt in your
pocket and smoke it some other
time. It's a good one—I'll guar
antee that."
Banflister took the cigar because
he did not want to offend the other
man. He looked at Matthew Hol
lister appraislnglv. From the gray
felt hat to his ue?t black oxford#
everything Hollister wore appeared
to be new. His dark blue fleece
overcoat bore no relation whatever
to the worn tweed garment Ban
nister had seen him wear before.
The silk muffler was conservatively
correct. So wore the ?ray gloves.
But the change in Hollistcr'e ap
pearance was more than that
wrought by clothes. He looked .
vounger. The meek, submissive
t .anner was gone. To Bannister
the contrast between the man be
was fur-ins and the broken, hall
hysterical Matthew Hollister who
had cried out that the police must
protect bim was almost incoinpre
nensible. ■
BauUlster said suddenly, ^olng
down the street? Suppose we walk
along together?"
(To Be Continued*
been lecturing to members of i
that organization in their hall!
this week. Many Masons have j
been hearing Mr. Nelson as he j
spoke in the Mason hall in the
afternoons and evenings.
Advertise it or you may
have to keep it.
TRUSTEE'S SALE
Whereas,'default was made in
the payment of the indebtedness
secured by that deed in trust ex
ecuted by W. C. Edney and wife,
Lillie Edney, to E. W. Ewbank, |
trustee, dated October 28, 1919,
recorded in book 49 page 117
records of deeds in trust for Hen
derson county on account of
which the power of sale therein
conferred, after due and proper
notice, has become absolute.
Now. therefore, the said trus
tee will by virtue of the power
of sale contained in said deed in
trust, and in order to satisfy said
debt, and at the request of the
owner and holder of the note and
deed in trust, sell, to the highest
bidder, for cash at public auc
tion, at the courthouse door in
the City of Hendersonville, N. C.,
on January 31, 1934. at 12
o'clock noon, all of the following
property described in the said
deed in trust, to-wit:
Lying and being in the town
ship of CJlear Creek, County of
Henderson, State of North Caro
lina, known and described as fol
lows, viz:
BEGINNING at a maple at
bank of Clear Creek, I). A. Uy
ers' corner, and runs with his
line south .7 degrees. west 85
poles to branch; then up the
branch south 43 cast 25 poles;
thence cast up branch 9 poles;
thence with J. R. Jljll's line north
9 east v 1 degree 57 poies to a
stone Hill's corner; thence with
his line south 60 east v.. 1 degree
6 poles to James Clark's corner;
then with his line north 17 east
37 1-2 poles to a stake in Justus'
line; then with the same north 52
west 10 poles to a stone W. C.
Lyday's corner in public road;
then west G poles to a stake in
the north bank of dftch; then
down the north bank, of ditch to
Clear Creek; then down the creek
to the beginning, containing
eighteen (18) acres and 15 poles,
more or less.
It being a part of, the same
land conveyed to said W. C. Ed
ney by John Pendleton..#nd K. H.
Pendleton his wife, dated Febru
ary IS, 1912, recorJ^d, in book
75 at page 169 of the records of
Henderson county aforesaid. It
being the present place of resi
dence of said W. C. Edney and
Lillie Edney, which residence is
a six-room house, in which they
now live.
This sale to be made subject to
taxes, if any.
This 29th day of Dec., 1933.
E. W. Ewbank, Tnjstee.
Ewbank & Weeks, Attorneys.
t 12-29-Fri-4tp.
t _

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