OCR Interpretation


The times-news. (Hendersonville, N.C.) 1927-current, July 13, 1934, Image 3

Image and text provided by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library, Chapel Hill, NC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063811/1934-07-13/ed-1/seq-3/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 3

Times-News
Want Ad Rates
(Terms—Cask in Advance)
?c a word for this size type,
for first insertion; half price
for subsequent insertion!.
Monthly rate—$1 a line (this
tize type); minimum of fire
lines.
4c a word this size type
for first insertion, hplf
price for subsequent in
sertions.
6c a word for type this
size for first insertion;
half price for each addi
tional consecutive inser
tion. 1
Minimum charge, 25e.
CLASSIFIED DISPLAY RATE
60c par inch
Cards of Thanks and Trib
utes of Respect are accepted at
2c n word.
Do not ask for information
regarding "keyed" ads, as they
are strictly confidential.
If error is made. The Times
News is responsible for only
9De incorrect insertion. The
. customer is responsible for sub
' sequent insertions. The adver
| tis»r should notify immediately
«f soy corrections needed.
1 No classified ads taken over
' telephone.
Want ad department closes
it noon, and classification posi
tively will not b« guaranteed
sfter that hour.
Wsnt ads are always cash in
idvsnce except to business men
or concerns having accounts
with this newspaper. When
Wsnt Ads are charged the rate
• Is 10c and 5c per line, 20c and
, 10c per line, and 30c aad 16c
j per line.
FOR SALE
I 2—Houses and Real Estate
f ZXTRK SPECIAL BARGAIN—
Modfrn four-room cottage. Gar
ra/e. Street assessments paid
;rr full. Partly furnished. Gar
den. Grapes. Well shaded lot.
Ideal for small summer homa
Anders & Rector, Amer
ican Bank building. *
3—Livestock and Poultry
SADDLE HORSES AND PONIES
for sale or hire. Competent
instructors. Pony ring for kid
dies. Brookihire's Ridinjr Acad
emy, Second avenue and Kinf
street. Phone 62.
4—Seeds and Plants
C&T FLOWERS—Variety and
assortments for all occasions.
Murphy's Nurseries.
COW PEAS $1.75 to $2 bushel,
cabbage plants. Marigiobe to
matoes for late setting $2 per
thousand. Pace Plant Farm,
I'ana road. Phone 938-W. *
12—Miscellaneous
RELAX AND ENJOY LIFE. Col
or:' . full size gliders $11.90
and up. Terms $1.00 weekly.
' Brunson Furniture Company.*
FOR RENT
13—Room*
BEAUTIFULLY furnUhed room
excellent location. 613 4 th
Ave. West.
14—Apartments
APARTMENT FOR RENT. Com
nletely furnished front bed
room and kitchenette. 231
Fifth, east.
15—Houses
FURNfSHED house for rent; rea
sonable. 918 Kanuga street, j
FOR RENT—Furnished, lix-room
hou^e, three bedrooms, hot
water. 631 Willow street.
FOR RENT
Six Furnished Houses
I bv dav week or month. Flat Rock'
and Druid Hills. Phone 163 or
432. Millers. * 1
WANTED
26—Help (Female)
WANTED—Elderly woman de*ir
ins? a home, as companion and
help with house work. Ad
Box 6. Route 3, Hender
sonviiie.
WANTED — Child'* nune. Mu»t
na% e references. Live on prem
^s. Phone 689-W.
WANTED — Yohdk white ho««e
jtPeper. experienced. Apply to
_- ,rs« Kurman, Flanders avenue.
32—To 5wap
WANTED to buy or trade for
fi^od used two-door sedan. D.
__ ° Justus. postoffice.
^ 37—Miscellaneous
WANTED to RENT for MMti
Piano in jrood condition. Mrs.
_ Kurman, Flanders avenue.
^ MINTED—A w»««i b*br MMrri»)«. J
-Miist be reasonable. Apply op- j
Hosite Blue Ridge school.
WANTED —Clean, white
fags. Brintf to Times
News,
OUT OUR WAY By Williams
{that's all sh^ got married FER— \
' JlST TO 6IT OUTA VS4ARSHIN* PISHES— \
TH' HULL REASON? 9HE'LL JlST HAND
THAT <3UV A rAM AND A SPOON EVEV
MfcAL. WHY HE'S SAPPY ENOUGH TO
EAT OUT OF A NOSE BAG, SO SHE WON'T
HAFTA WARS* DISHES—WHY ELSE
WOULD SHE MARRY A GUY WITH HARDLY
NO CHINt? cuz: HE'S A EASY MARK
THAT'S WHY— I KNOW HERl
PITT
TT3C
OH, BOSH/ \
I SUPPOSE ^
1 GOT MARRIED
TO GET OUT
OP WORK,
TOO, HAH?
I WHERE QUALITY and moderate
prices meet, and shoppers are
welcome. Brurtson Furniture
Company. *
WANTED—Poplar wood. Farm
ers Federation. *
Lost and Found
40—Personal Property
LOST—Filvve glasses, pink gold
rims, brown leather case. Re
turn Western Unoin.
Special Notices
BOUCLET YARN, $3.50 per lb.
Instructions in afternoon. Gifts.
Authentic hand-made reproduc
tions of antique furniture. Lit
tle's, Fifth avenue west.
HIGH SCHOOL TEACHER, care.
ful driver, wants three passeng
I ers 12 days sight-seeing tour
' to Niagara Falls, New York,
and Washington. Especially
fine for boys. Reasonable. 429
South Main.
WOMAN'S CLUB HOUSE, Druid
Hills, home atmosphere. Tea
room, meals, refreshments. Pri
vate parties. Mrs. George W.
Fletcher, hostess. Telephone
29-W. *
TOURISTS AND VISITORS wel
come. Try our delicious barbe
cue, minced now 5c, sliced 10c.
If you don't like barbecue we
have other sandwiches you will
like. Shorty's Pig 'N Whistle,
South Main street. Open 'till
4 a. m. *
AUTO PAINTING — First-class J
duco refinishing, also any kind
of iob and any price job. j
Featherstone, Shipman's Garage.
TRY ZOTOZ, the Machineless
Permanent. Other permanentsl
$5 to $7.50. DeLuxe Beaiity!
Shoppe. Phone 916, next to (
Carolina Theatre. *
WE ARE NOW carrying a line
of best makes of corsets, cor-;
sellettes and brassieres, in sum-j
mer and other weights. JEN-i
NIB BOWEN'S. *;
THE BEST PLACE IN TOWN
to get your sandwiches and:
drinks. We serve only the best
that can be bought. Genuine
Imported Swiss Cheese, Spiced
Beef, Salomi, Corned Beef,
Goose Liver, Chicken Salad,
Baby Club, Barbecue. We serve
all kinds of fountain drinks.
"Service with a sitoile." We
have plenty of parking space.
THOMPSON'S, North Main Street
"Where friends meet to eat." *
SPECIALS—Choice round steak
20c. sirloin -23c, pure pork
sausage 12 l-2c, veal chops
10c, steak 20c. fresh beef liver
15c. Fish. Howard's Star Mar
ket. next to Shorty's Barbecue,
Greenville highway.
WOULD YOU like good typing
or shorthand by the hour oi
piece work . If so, please ap
ply at Room No. 1, Huntei
building.
BIG DANCE at Osceola Beach,
Saturday night, July 14 ch.
Combination round and square
dancing. Admission 75c, ladies
free.
WE WILL BUY POULTRY Tue7
day morning, 17th. Heavy hens
12c, light hens 8c, fryers lfic.
Farmers' Federation.
GIVE TUMBLE INN • a trial.
Rooms with running water, con- f
necting baths. Specializing in
steaks, chops, chicken and stone j
crabs. Formerly with Joe's of
Miami Beach. Phone 468-J.
A GOOD PLACE to fet your
sandwiches and drinks. Visit
us and be convinced. All kinds
of salads, sandwiches and
drinks. Curb service and pri
vate booths. Log Cabin Sand
wich Shop. Five blocks from!
courthouse on Greenville high
Way. <
ORR'S CAMP— i wo miles east
of Hendersonville, One to four
room cabins for rent. Thi3
camp for sale.
KEEP THE FLIES OUT with
shop-made screens. Doors and
windows made to order on
short notice. Rip by-Morrow Co.,
Lumber, Builders' Supplies,
Millwork. Fourth avenue east.
Phone 97. *
| LENTHERIC Perfumes and Cos*
metics Zotos Machineless Perm
I anent Waves. Skyland Hotel
| Beauty Shop. *
Radio Service
I
Expert Radio Repairing
| Call Joe Sargent 665-W.
RADIO SALES AND SERVICE.
I Tubes tested free. Complete
stock on hand. Midcity Tire
Co., 210 Fourth avenue west.
Phone 121. *
[P BALFOUR )
1 BALFOUR, July 13.—Rev. C.
E. Blythe filled his regular ap
pointment at this place Sunday.
Miss Beulah Lance, of Crab
Creek, was an overnight guest of
Miss Isabella Raines last Satur
day.
Mr. and Mrs. Paul Barnett have
moved into this* community.
Miss Florence Justice gave a
study course for several days last
week, closing Sunday. It was of
great benefit to those taking it.
Mr. Pr.ui Byers, of Washington,
D. C., spart a few days with his
familv during the week of July
: 4th.
Mr. Henry Flynn, of Chester,
S. C., was home with his family
| for several days recently.
! Mrs. J. B. Stansell took her
Sunday school class on a picnic
Monday afternoon.
Rev. and Mrs. C. E. Blythe
were dinner guests of Mr. and
[Mrs. B. H. Raines, Saturday.
Mrs. J. A. Fore visited her
daughter, Mrs. Albert Stepp, of
Hendersonville, recently.
The choir from Pleasant Grove
rendered some good singing at
Balfour last Sunday night, which
was enjoyed by all.
Mrs. Maude Freeman and chil
dren, of Bat Cave, visited he;*
daughter, Mrs. W. E. Flj^nn, last
Sunday.
Mrs. H. C. Lusk, who has been
ill, is able to be out again.
Mr. Carl Kuykendall spent sev
eral days with his uncle, in Sylva.
Mr. Richmond Taylor is now
employed in Spartanburg, S. C.
Messrs. Paul Flynn and Alfred
Beck, of Blairsville, Ga., called at j
the home of Mr. Flynn's sister,
Monday night.
Miss Isabella Raines, Mack
Lyda, Ellen Flynn and Howard
Dalton called at the home of Mr.
Griffin, of Fruitland, Wednesday
night, July 4th.
THE NEWFANGLES (Movi'n Pop) By Cowan
YOU KNOW, VERY WELL,THAT
WE'P IK4 AN AWFUL FIX,
IF YOU WEREN'T ABLE TO
WORK.
NPWV, HE UON' I" HU« \*t>\ riK. '' i
HOOCH— I BEEN-Av BLOWE.O |
UP-A SO MANY TIME AT-A ,
YWE, ONCE.-A MOQE,HEL /
MAKEl-A HO D\FF
- JfA
ALLEY OOP i; - By HAMLIN
NOV) YOU HAVE
DONE IT,
> YOU BIG
\ BRUTE/,
«v
LIEUTENANT
OOP
YEZZlR, j
YEZZlR,
WELL - WHAT ;
HAVE » OONE / OK ALLEV
THAT
S RIGHT ? / rouiso /av
FOOTPRINTS, TO
TELL THE QUEEN THAT
t THREW THE MELON
AT THAT HORRtO
PRINCESS VOU
1'
ARE GOING TO.
'A
v^_
vjh , vtAH r ;1 '
NGW,USSEN, // OH, YOU'RE!
OOOLA — J( ALV/AVS TELLING
LEMME TEU. \\ SOMEBOrw.
YOU SUMPIN-) \ SOMETHING/
rM TH GUV VMO
FOUND YOUR ■//
footprints.' )L\
u
it!
'I M*>
V
■•'ft
IV
IV [•
FRECKLES AND HIS FRIENDS
BIRCH bark f
JUST "THINK, HUTTY....
-jt>MO»ROW WE'LL BE THERE ■
I'M CLAD WE DIDN'T
PICK UP A CANOE... WE
CAN GET ONE MADE 3Y
THE INDIANS, OUT OF
CANT "YbU 7 I'd *
JUST SEE A | RATHER
NINE-POUND SusTEN
TROUT CRABBING Jip HIM
A FLY AND /SIZZLING
BREAKING i IN THE
WATER?- J FRYING
PAN!
SOPHIE KERR'S SUPERB LOVE STORY
vr fp
«jlj 1
Jt
T t«ri«j
« % W' W* 4
tJLJL s
By Sophie Ker,
BEGIN HERE TODAY
Jane Terry comet to New York
determined to show her home
town and especially Amy Jackson
that she can make a success of
her life. Amy had been her best
friend until Howard Jackson
broke the engagement Jane forced
on him and married Amy. Unable !
to bear the sight of Amy s happi
ness, Jan« obtains a job in a New
York real estate office.
Jane clever and soon is mak
ing an excellent salary. She has
an affair with Roger Thorpe, who
is married. Later she tires of him
and when he offers to bear the
expense of their child she dismiss
es him contemptuously.
In her., desperate plight Jane
turns to i Amy for help. Howard
is touring Germany and Amy
comes to New York. She stays
until the, baby is born and then,
horrified because Jane insists On
giving her daughter away, agrees
to take the child with the under
standing that Jane never shall
reclaim her.
Back in Marburg Amy worries
over what Howard will think of
her takine the baby. A month
passes and then one morning the
telephone rings and she hears his
voice.
NOW GO ON WITH THE STORY
CHAPTER XX
Over the telephone Howard ex
plained it all to Amy. He and Pro
fessor Ellert had suddenly man
aged to pet passage on a freighter
, —slow and small and primitive,
without a wireless. They had just
landed and he had raced to the
nearest telephone. Yes. he had
sent her a cable when they left
but had had to entrust it to a
stupid chap. Probably he'd pocket
ed the money and thrown the mes
sage away. They were both well
and he was going to grab old Pro
fessor Ellert and dash to the sta
tion for the next train.
"But I had to hear your voice,
Amy—I couldn't wait. I'll send a
wire if there's time but I had to
speak to you first." And then
again "Darling'—darling!"
After she had put down the
telephone she remembered that he
didn't yet know about the baby.
Not that it mattered. He was back,
he was safe. In another day he
would be with her! Nothing, noth
ing else mattered beyond that
blessed knowledge and expecta
tion.
How she ever got through the
interval she could not tell. She
telephoned and was telephoned to,
though she hardly knew what she
was saying. She cleaned and pol
ished and arranged and re-ar
ranged the house. She crammed
her refrigerator and pantry with
evey eatable for which Howard
had ever shown the slightest pref
erence. She filled the rooms with
flowers. She played loud triumph
ant music—the A Flat Polonaise,
the Rakoczy March and the hilar
ious "Alexander's Ragtime Band"
—but every moment was an age
and she turned constantly to j
watch thd clock. A telegram came, J
telling the train, the hour of his
arrival, and at last time reluct
antly dragged itself to the fulfill
ment of the promise.
He was there, actuallv, brown J
and hard and strong. His arms i
were like bands of steel around
her. "I worked as an able seaman
on that damned boat," he said.
"It would have been fun if I had
not been so anxious to pot back
to you. I'll never let you out ot
mv sight again—" . ,
i 'His clothe? were torn, wrinkled
and water-soaked, "i had nothing
to change into. We lost our teg
gage in Germany, or had it pinch
ed. Old Ellert mourned his night
shirts every hour of ths way back.
It was a whale of an adventure
the Whole thine, aad I ni' <jladI I
saw it and glad I m out of it. I
got a billion things to tell you. But
first I want to hear what you ve j
^She" blurted it out: "I've adopt
ed a baby. A little girl!
He laughed aloud: Amy
don't believe you!"
"But I have. It's the truth.
Come along and look at her.
He followed, holding; her aim
tight, still lailghing.,but at the
Sight of the cradle and the sleep
ins: child he stopped amazed
"Well I'm a son of a gun. it is
the truth ,A little girl? What's
^'ShThasn't any yet. I waited
for vou to choose one.
"Good, we'll call her Axelina
after the wife of the captain o
the ship. She was a stand old
Norwegian dame six feet two,
voice like a fog-horn, hard enough
to be the Ellert Museum, bossed
the whole works."
She watched him for some svn
of disapproval. "You dont mind.
Howard? You're sure you don t
| mlBut he only took her again in
! his arms. "Amy. sweet, anything
I in this world vou want to do
! right with me."
| *
! Jane read the letter from Miss
1 Rosa with a frown. It was plain
I tive querulous, quite unlike Miss
Rosa's usual robust communica
tions. She didn't feel well She
I Was tired all the time. She didn t
| sleep more than two hours a night.
I This war over in Europe was very
| upsetting and now it looked .
though America would have
join in and a fine mess that would
he' Her affairs were in bad older,
?oo, and she didn't trust the ad
vice of this new young paitner
Mr. Massey had taken m, one of
the Trainors and the Tia noi.
were trash through and through.
She wished to goodness Jane
would come and help her decide
what to do. Sh^_didn't want to
end her days in the P°frh°usJ'
but she felt she was surely h- ad
e^Tpdut\hc letter down on
her desk and considered. It was
afmost four years gnce she had
been to Marburg. Her last \isit
there was when she had manage
to iret her inheritance out of Mis.
Rosa's and old Mr. Massey's
h&"The old chap was wga
rhe thought, "and if 8
n t.mart voung hiCK the e s
telling what could happen to Aunt
Rtsa'f money. That money ousjt
to come to me some day. I •
T had some of it now for this
Seal" sale. It would be handy.
I suppose I'll have to go and look
mtHer little office was a neat
and pleasant place even on this
cloudy March corning. T11 ft
was nothing feminine about it ex
cept Jane herself, -slender and
smart in her dress of fine da™
serge with thin white mffles
across the neck and around her
wrists. The clear contrast suited
her. Her sense of drama was
gratified by good clothes and
good grooming. She was the suc
cessful young business woman,
setting and costume complete.
But the plain polished walnut,
the casement cloth curtains, the
dark rugs, the call-button, tele
phone, letter baskets — these
might just as well have belonged
to a successful young business
man. It was perhaps an uncon
scious tribute to the rebellion of
Ann Veronica against a man
made world — though Jane did
not read Ann Veronica now—
which kept Jane's office like a
man's. Aiso it made her clients
a little more easy in their min is
about doing: business with so
young a woman.
* # *
After the Thorpe episode was
completely over and Amy had
taken the child, Jane had started
out for herself, a perilous pro
ceeding for one with only a small
circle of friends and acquaint
ances, since the real estate busi
ness counts so surely on such
contacts. Yet Jane had done
fairly well. Now and then she
acted confidentially for Kandels',
and Mr. Kandel had urged her to
come back to his office, but she
would not do that.
Gradually and persistently she
had worked up a definite line for
| herself among the small land
lords and her progress had been
steady, her profits slight, but
sure. It had meant week after
week, month after month of hard
grind 10, 12, 14 hours a day. Not
that Jane objected to the jrrind.
She wanted to be so tired at
ni^ht that she would neither
think nor remember. She wel
comed an anodyne for regret and
| humiliation. Regret for her fool
[ ish surrender to Roger Thorpe,
humiliation and anger for having,
as she saw it, abased herself to
Amy, permitted Amy to insult
her.'
Amy had told her to stay out
of her life, never to try to take
the child. Jane hated the recol
lection of it, the submission to
Amy. She should have been as
bitter with Amy as Amy had
been with her. As for staying
out of Amy's life—why, it was
Amy who had better stay out of
hers, Jane's—hadn't she begun
by taking Howard Jackson away
from her? And now, her chiid?
* * *
Time had blurred and faded
these resentments, pushed them
into the background. Jane's as
surance had returned with her
established business, her growing
bank account and her own pri
vate discretion. She had taken
another apartment — with eleva
tors and an alert hall force. She
asked some of her best clients to
dinner now and then and was
asked by tfhem in return. She
went to the theater and to an oc
casional concert or art show
with a woman friend, Mjss Jar
dine perhaps, or some other
chosen for politic reasons, but
her work waa her first interest
and nothing pushed it aside.
Sometimes all that nonsense
about Roger Thorpe, and the
child, and even Amy, took on a
quality of unreality. Such things
surely could never have happened
to this brisk resourceful creature
who lived so sensibly, so openly,
with no hitit of romantic ven
ture. 14
Nevertheless,. Jane had notJgona
back to Marburg. There was no
reason why she should. Miss'Rom
and she were better friends -at a
distance, and this was the first
time Rosa had ever sounded a
note of distress. Knowing her
aunt's disposition to ride down
both physical ailments and men
tal perturbations, Jane knew
there was something: serious be
hind the present appeal. Mis*
Rosa was not one to make a fus«
about nothing. "She's not reajly
old," thought Jane. "She never
tells her age, but she can't ba
more than fil or 62. So she sure
ly must be sick. And this Masse?
partner must have bothared he;
more than she says. . I shall hav«
to look into that."
(Copyright, 1034, by Sophie Kerr)
(To be continued.)

PRIZED BIBLE RETURNED
GERVAIS, Ore., July 18. (UP)'
Lost for four years, a prized Bi
ble. believed stolen from the auto
mobile of the Rev. 11. L. tlraffious,
has been returned. The hook was
practically worn out, as if it had
bee n read and studied intensely.
WHOee«FIR5T>|
IN AMERICA / 1
By Joseph Nathan Kan*
Author of "Famous First Facts"|
Where was I he first Amerl
ij*n trans-Atlantic vessel built?
When did Abraham Llhroln
issue his first call for Union
troops?
When were postal savings
stamps first issued?
Answers in next Issut.
• * i
M&NJU*
ROSS.
OF
WYOMING,
FIRST
WOMAN
State
GOVERNOR.
7 FlRSf
/ COMIC.
/ WBIKCY
/ puolisheo
IN
PHILADELPHIA.
1848.
FIRST STATE HOSPITAL.
FO^ INSANE OPENED AT
WILLIAMSBURG,VA.,1773. '
.Aiimwts In Previous (JurstiQiiK
HS. Hf»SS assumed Hip Rover
norship of Wyoming mi Jan.
■i. lfU5. (o (ill (ho unexpired tefm
•of lior liusliaud. Mrs.
..Miriam A Kcrj:ii>oii Iipuihip gov
ernor of Texas five darn laier.
The first comic weekly wa*
named "The John Ponkey." "Tin*
Puhlick Hospital for Persona of
Insaftn and Disordered Mlrtdli"
was iuirorporated in 1768. but did
not <*j)en until 177:J. Later It be
ranifs known as the Eastern Stale
vou»ital.

xml | txt