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The times-news. [volume] (Hendersonville, N.C.) 1927-current, August 01, 1935, Image 1

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WEATHER
. dojdr *nd Fri"
|p»rtly t!
eH«n«re i" temperature.
ifi t' •! i' k
Largest Daily Circulation of Any Newspaper in North Carolina in Proportion to Population
HENDERSONVILLE, N. C., THURSDAY, AUGUST 1, 1935
GOOD AFTERNOON
And don't think these new half
cent piece* won't come in hand?
a* campaign contributions next
year.
SINGLE COPIES, FIVE CENTS
* *
*** **• *** ***
* * * *
azis Put Masons On Reich Blacklist
ilERWlT IS
HER BAN IN
flMIVE
Iter Campaign Now Ex
plained as Result of
I Economic Crisis
llNG COSTS HIGH;
I UNREST PREVALENT
Effrigki 19.'7. I'nited Press)
ft -(UP). Mi.
1 today ■ re swept into the
K- Iriv state "total
■ ■ Krosick, finance
ft
Bptatdtpaent to report by
K. 1 •xr.t'.-u they belong or
belonged to Masonic lodges
■r • institutions. Those
■.f. r-: r " be denied promo
■«. fAe agister decree-l, giving
■ 'hat \a7.is dis

B, HAROLD L. PETERS
ted Prc»» Staff Corre»pondent
CTLLV A«t. I. <yP> *o
,,c v-altir- n-oiv, Ger
:vs cripple*! wrld trade
tlv Hue to boycotts abroad -
mounting trices for th» ne
iities nt Me w. ad7"C™r
night as a major .
nptinjt the nereasinc'.v h. t«M
li Anti-Jewish. Ant'.-l atholu
\nt.->tahl h*' • cv. a-r- •
Wl« *"«'> throochou*
Reich as" offica'.>. allegedly
ting to meet growing <h*ou
ft. urn the populate
|K else to think about" in
■panning
■ ;n kftpiw with r
Bst conceptions.''
Bo tows 1ST
1
I of
ftneH Jews from bathing
I
I "racial pollution" an<i re
fitted Jews to trade among
pn^'.ves.
II
ft
■ Jewish migrations to the
KmI.
K' 1
B7 fv: jr; "-her pri<-"< gravely
^ftrwr? »i:ce an<! • hori
■f var
v "ant;-ramDai?ns" will pre
■ sack

ft dras ,,n.
-am short
• XT' v . ich rai-ed
I' • ."»■ -:e relieved by
r-x late thi^
" v ••!•••.'< rill soil for
-•-a" "-atks ISO cents)
'"n : . jjood quality.
^ ' • " -*h for Germany.
T-'i neennib < -'ifi
pound-. quality
°wiCT exporters are asking
*" '^c :» per cont. oren
1 : *]c prices, rlue tr
..a"-', policy of con
i • • - abroad or tht
''ir' • •v:r of German
",'3 '
1 ■■••r shortages
*>11 and wool
3 1 • -in substitutes
" and onsatisfac
B . a tire industry
■ difficulty in attempt
"^rcentage of
■ ^ nt-ip-i on page three)
Assails Nazis in
Quiz Demand
With the view to determining if
the United States would be justi
fied in severing diplomatic rela
. tions with Germany, militant Sen
ator William H. King of Utah,
above, made a fiery demand for
investigation of alleged Nazi reli
gious persecutions. "The Hitler
government has oppressed Jews
and Catholics and has not dis
charged its proper obligations to
the United States," he declared.
: INDIANS
ATTEND PICNIC
Eighteen Cities Represent
ed, With St. Peters
burg Leading
Approximately 100 Floridians
| an others attended the picnic I
I sponsored bv the Florida club at
j Orr's camp, on the Chimney Rock
road, vesterdav.
Eighteen Florida cities were
represented in the gathering with
the largest delegation being from
St. Petersburg, and in addition
six other states were represented.
A bountiful picnic lunch was
enjoyed and afterward various
games such as shuffle board,
tennis, horse shoe pitching, and
others were enioyed.
The outing was sponsored by
th»i club, of which Mrs. D. E.
Billman is president, and Virgil
Boozer chairman of the enter
tainment committee.
Florida cities represented were
Coral Gables, St. Petersburg,
| St. Cloud, West Palm Peach,
Gainesville, Lake Worth, Miami,
l.ake Coma, Pomona, Daytona
Peach, Jacksonville, Orlando,
Tampa, Crester City, Titusville,
St. Augustine Orantre Park, and
Crystal River. In addition Cleve
land, Ohio; Knelewood, N. J.;
j New York City; Pasadena. Calif.,
Washington, D. C., and Hender
sonville were represented.
Those registering were: Miss
S. C- VV ade, Mrs. M. Russell,
Minnie and Nellie Mickle, Kath
arine Harris, Mrs. E. S. Smith.
Mrs. Margaret Wheeler. Mrs. B.
; Daemicke. Mrs. V. H. Moore, E.
S. Smith. Mrs. Sluter. Billy and
(C^ontinupd on four)
V
Bnur
nneyer In Italy to Advocate
Wcott Against Nazi Germany
do* 1 IUP).—An eco
f1 r ^0~cvtt against Nazi Ger
p advocated yesterday !,y
r1?i 1 ntermeyer New York at
p'*ho arrived here to con-1
Wt'cai officials and pos
I^Pe Piu«. He will endeavor (
the church to join a
'"•'•arian arti-Nazi leaeue. \
/ "oyc-.tt supported by a ma
i; ' " rld's labor unions
* °nlv means of halting the 1
■T Erne's attempt to destroy
Canity and substitute a God
P».'an religion," Untermeyer
Germany has lost 52 per
her trade with the United
f*8 (tit of her re
t;ade because of
I already it does
1 u-h imagination to
f4'7" the effect of the recent
•• - ,f Catholicism
*h. 7! uctior* raken by the
U ?°n of economic.
u alu»»e counteract the
insults and injuries suffered by
the church/'
Untermeyer advocated that the
United State" refuse to participate
in the 193G Olympic frames at Ber
lin.
FORT LAUDERDALE
BUILDING IS ACTIVE
FT. LAUDERDALE. Fla., Aug.
1.— (UP)—Building permits is
sued in Ft. Lauderdale during
July amounted to $77,225, bring
ing the 10-month total of the fis
cal year to $529,733 yesterday.
Trade journals have estimated
there is more building under con
struction here than any other city
of its size in the nation.
Construction of 15 new homes,
a large apartment building, a com
mercial building and numerous
improvements were parted this
month. There ia.no ,ujiemployment
among carpenters, officials said.
TO RESTRAIN
PffA AWARDS
IN ALABAMA
FERA Pares Down Relief
Rolls; State is Given
$530,000
HOUSE AGAIN TURNS
DOWN 'DEATH' CLAUSE
WASHINGTON, Aup. 1. (UP).
—District Supreme Court Justice
Dickinson Letts today announced
that he would issue a preliminary
injunction to the Alabama Power
Co., preventing the use of PWA i
funds for construction by four j
Alabama cities of electric systems i
for use of the TVA.
ARE TAPERING OFF
RELIEF ACTIVITIES
WASHINGTON, Aug. 1. (UP).
—The FERA has started paring
down the nation's direct relief
rolls by alloting August money to
13 states only.
For the first half of the month
August allocations include Florida,
$655,221; Kentucky, $890,300;
North Carolina, $530,000; Tennes
see, $170,916. These allotments
are for special programs only.
RAYBURN MOVES TO
ADVANCE MEASURE
oration insiiuuiuK mc nuu^c con
ferees to accept the utHity's 'death
sentence* in the senate's approved
bill.
ROOSEVELT AGAIN
REBUFFED IN HOUSE
WASHINGTON, Aug. 1. (UP)
The house again rejected Presi
dent Roosevelt's demand for the
"death sentence" on unessential
utility holding companies, voting
it down 209 to 155.
ADMITS HE PROPOSED
ANTI NEW DEAL DRIVE
WASHINGTON, Aug. 1. (UP).
—E. P. Cramer, Plainlield, N. J.,
advertising man, admitted to the
senate lobby investigators that
he suggested to the utility com
pany that a wldspering cam
paign be initiated to "create
popular suspicion that New Deal
ers are either incompetent or in
sane."
Saluda Resident
Is Given Burial
SALUDA, Aug. 1. — Mrs. H.
P. Lane, for many years a resi
dent of Saluda, died suddenly at
her home here Tuesday after
noon. A number of step-children
survive.
Funeral services were held
Wednesday morning at o'clock
in Saluda with the Rev. H. Cary
Ehves officiating. Interment at
the old home place in Sumter, S.
C.
Mrs. Lane was the widow of
the late Henry B. Lane, for many
years cashier of the Carolina
State bank at Saluda.
Mrs. Lane had been in poor
health for some time but be
came seriously ill only about an
hour before her death.
PISTOL FIRE DRIVES
UNION SEAMEN BACK
HOUSTON, Aupr. 1.—(UP).—
Sixty-five members of the Intern,". -
tional Seamen's Union attacked a
ship in port here, said to be
manned by non-union workers. A
volley of pistol fire drove the at
tackers back. No casualties were
reported.
CALENDAR
THURSDAY. AUGUST 1.
The Dicie Howell recital, which
had been announced at the city
auditorium, has been cancelled.
Dance, round and square, Amer
ican Legion clubhouse, 9:30 p. m.
FRIDAY, AUGUST 2.
Chamber of Commerce enter
tainment, city auditorium, 8:30
p. m.
SATURDAY. AUGUST 3.
College Night Dance, music by
Jimmie Livingston and orchestra,
<'ity gymnasium, V p. m.
> -
Meet "Mr. K"
The complications that have found
echo in Berlin as a result of May
or Fiorello LaGuardia's efforts to
prevent issuance of a masseur's
license to Paul W. Kress (above),
of New York, has brought inter-1
national fame to the young Ger
man who seeks his second Ameri
can citizenship papers. In early
reports of the case, Kress's iden
tity was concealed by enigmatic
references to "Mr. K."
COUNTY FAI
ISCA
But Fair Directors Assure
One Will be Staged
Next Year
The directors of the Henderson
County Fair association announce
that the fair will not be held this
year, and in explanation make the
following statement:
"The Fair Association had ar
ranged to establish fair grounds
on the site of the old golf course
on the Asheville highway and the
work of erecting buildings was al
ready under way when the com
mittee for the location of the
State's sanitarium visited Hen
derson county and took the site
under consideration as the loca
tion for the State hospital. The
fair directors stepped aside and
announced that if the site was de
sired for the location of the hos
pital all claims of the association
on the property would be waived.
"The hospital committee has not
announced its decision, and the
delay caused by this development
would now make it impossible to
erect buildings and equip the fair
grounds in time for this year's
exhibit, if the committee finally
decides not to locate the hospital
in Henderson county.
"In view of this situation, the
fair directors decided to postpone
the building of fair grounds until
next year. If the State hospital is
not located on the golf course
site, that will be utilized next
year as the site of the fair
grounds. If the hospital is located
on this site, another site will he
secured for the fair grounds.
"The directors of the Fair as
sociation assure the people of the
county that the fair will he op
erating next year, at the golf
course site or elsewhere in the
county."
U. S. PREPARES
TO MATCH SEA
POWERABROAD
Will Have Ship for Ship,
Gun for Gun at Bases,
if Treaties Fail
swansonIndicates
POLICY OF FUTURE
By HOBART C. MONTEE
United Pre*s Staff Correspondent
WASHINGTON, Aug. 1. (UP) |
The United States will be pre
pared to match other naval pow
ers gun for gun on outlying naval J
bases as well as ship for ship in I
their navies in event the present
naval limitation treaties lapse,
Secretary of the Navy Claude A.
Swanson indicated yesterday.
He repeated that the United
States navy long has had under
consideration plans for the estab
lishment of naval bases on the
American possessions in the Pa
cific as a sequel to other powers' !
indication of a desire to strike
the treaty fetters from naval con
struction.
The present treaties, which ter
minate on December 31, 1936, at
Japan's request, forbid the forti
fication of the Aleutian Islands
off the Alaskan coast; Wake,
Midway and Guam islands in the
South Pacific. The same treaties
"froze" American fortifications
in the Philippines at their 1921
B tat us.
fh« prospect that the United
States may lose the Philippines as
a home base for the U. S. Aasiatic
fleet as a result of their prospec
tive independence may require
the U. S. navy to look elsewhere,
Swanson said.
This might lead to plans for de
veloping powerful sea bases on
some of the other Pacific posses
sions. particu arly on Guam and
the Aleutian islands.
Officials here anticipate that
when the Washington treaty ex
pires Japan may resume where
she left off in 1921 with her am
bitious program for fortifying
the oBnin islands, lying 500 miles
south of Yokohama on almost a
direct line toward Guam. The
original p ans called for trans
forming the Bonins into a Japan
ese sea base rivaling: the great
Singapore base of Britain. The
signing of the Washington treaty
interrupted the work, and the is
lands are only partially fortified.
All sources here indicated that
America's tentative plans to be
gin fortification of the Pacific
possessions will depend largely
upon the action of other naval
powers. Swanson said the ques
tion of outlying sea bases inevit
ably must be taken up by any in
ternational naval conference call
ed in the future.
POLITICAL AFFAIRS
OF CUBA VERY QUIET
MIAMI, Fla.. Aug. 1.—(UP)—
Political conditions in Cuba are
"very quiet," Jefferson Caffery,
United States ambassador to
Cuba, said today as he arrived
here from Havana aboard a Pan
American plane.
Caffery was en route to Wash
ington on a semi-annual trip
which he said will be devoted to
routine business in the national
capital. He expects to return to
Cuba next week.
More Building Is in Progress in the
Southeast Than Any Time Since 1931
ATLANTA, Aug. 1. (UP)-—
Twenty cities in the southeast
issued more building; permits last
month than for any month since
April of 1931, the Atlanta fed
eral reserve bank reported yes
terday.
Building1 permits in the im
porting cities totaled $4,400,000
for June, 22. f per cent, more
than for May and 91.9 per cent,
more than in June last year.
Coal mining showed an in
crease for the month in Tenn
essee and Alabama, but whole
sale and retail trade suffered sea
sonal losses the sixth federal re
serve district business survey
showed.
Department store sales in June
were 18.4 per cent, less than in
May and declined 1.2 percent
from June, 1934. Wholesale trade
declined 14.7 per cent. "0,n
May to June and 2.3 p«» Cl'nt
from June last year.
- For; the fu-st haif of tin* >'ear'
| retail sales show a 3 per cent,
gain oyer the same period last
year, and wholesale trade a 1.4
per cent, increase.
The bank's business survey
covers the states of Georgia,
Alabama, Florida, Louisiana,
Mississippi and East Tennessee.
MIAMI ACTIVITY
SHOWS 80 PCT. GAIN
MIAMI, Fla., Aug. 1. (UP).—
A p-ain of nearly 80 per cent,
over figures of the corresponding
period last year was shown to
day by the combined total of
building permits issued in Miami
Beach during the first seven
months of 1935.
This year's figure for the two
cities was $7,666,303. Miami
Beach led with $5,211,150 to
Miami's $2,455,153. Last year's
combination figure (for the two
municipalities was $4,280,622.
FRANTIC MIDNIGHT PARLEYS
OF BRITISH AND ITALIANS
FAIL TO AID PEACE MOVE
GENEVA, Aug. l._(UP).—
League of Nations council efforts
to avert war in East Africa were
threatened with disaster last night,
After a session terminating ab
ruptly with sharp clashes between
British Secretary for League Af
fairs Anthony Eden and Chief
Italian Delegate Baron Pompeo
Aloisi, frantic efforts to reach a
compromise solution failed.
The council is confronted with
deadlock.
Italy refuses flatly to permit
league intervention beyond reviv
ing arbitration strictly in accord
ance with its own ban against
frontier boundary discussions.
Ethiopia declines to limit arbi
trators' competence, holding fron
tier incidents cannot be consid
ered without weighing border de
limitations.
Eden insists the league is en
titled to investigate the entire
Italo-Ethiopian dispute in all its
ramifications.
After the council adjourned
last night Eden and French Pre
mier Pierre Laval strove for a
new plan to avert war, binding the
three signatories of the 1906 trea
ty recognizing Ethiopia's sover
eignty—Britain, Franc eand Italy
—to start immediate negotiations
for a peaceful settlement.
But in a series of frantic mid
night conferences Eden, Laval and
Aloisi failed to agree on a draft
resolution embodying a plan for a
peaceful settlement.
Thev decided to resume private
council conversations today in an
atmosphere strained already by
the tilt between Eden and Aloisi
which definitely lined Britain up
on the side of Ethiopia.
Laval indicated the first day of
the council's fourth attempt to
prevent East African hostilities
produced only further divergen
cies of views. He said several days
may be necessary for reaching an
agreement.
Reportedly, the last draft reso
lution on which negotiations are
proceeding provides for resump
tion of arbitration of the Ual Ual
clash with appointment of a fifth
conciliator—-possibly the Swedish
jurist Nicolas Politas. It provides
for opening negotiations between
signatories of the 1906 treaty and
Ethiopia covering the entire dis
pute and a pledge by Ethiopia and
Italy not to resort to force.
But little hope was pinned to (
this formula. There appeared to ,
be no budging the Ethiopian and
Italian delegates and the situation
was complicated further by the
opposing stands of Eden and Alo
isi, who failed to yield to compro
mise overtures by Laval and So
viet Foreign Commissar Maxim
Litvinoff, council president.
Third Heat Wave
of Season Brings
Many Fatalities
Press Poll Shows Them at
77, With Death Toll
Mounting Hourly
(UNITED PRESS)
The summer's third intensive
heat wave moved slowly eastward
across America today, causing
great loss of life, incalculable suf
fering and damaere to many crops.
A United Press survey showed
that the death toll from prostra
tion, drownings and storms is 77,
with the number mounting hourly.
HIT-AND-RUN
CHARGE MADE
Man Held Turns Out to Be
Brother of Prisoner
Making Charge
Deputies John Drake and Roy
Owens, returning from the arrest
of two men, last night ran down
a hit-and-run drivef, and discov
ered that the driver was a broth
er of one of the men they had al
ready arrested.
The officers were returning to
Hendersonville with Carl Hamp
ton and James Sizemore, arrested
on drunk and disorderly charges.
At the French Broad bridge on
the Haywood road they were flag
ged by two men who said that
their car had been hit by a truck
which did not stop. The officers
gave chaae, overtook the truck,
and arrested Ralph Hampton,
driver, and a man named Murray.
The collision occurred just this
side of the bridge. H. C. Turner,
of Waynesville, and C. W. Pen
land, of Candler, were riding in
a Chevrolet sedan. The rear end
of their car was sideswiped by the
truck, also a Chevrolet, and com
pletely demolished, but neither of
the men was injured.
BELIEVE AIRMAN
DROWNED IN PACIFIC
. LONG BEACH, Cal., Aufr. 1.
(UP).—An aviator's helmet was
washed up on the beach last
night, leading to belief that Lieut.
Arthur H. Skaer, missing on a
test flight in a new army fight
ing plane, had perished in the
ocean. Skaer's fellow army re
serve officers were notified and
asked to identify it.
The plane, supposedly capable
of traveling 325 miles an hour—
faster than the accepted world
record for land planes—was a
new design built bv the Northrop
Airplane factory for U- S. Army
consignment. 1
MAYOR CUES
Wl SHERMAN
Must Show Cause Friday
Why He Should Not Be
Held in Contempt
Mayor A. V. Edwards today is
sued an order whereby William
Sherman is to show cause in city
court Friday morning why he
should not be cited /for contcmpt
of court in connection with the
case of Gus Seawriafht, colored,
charged with violating the gamb
ling laws by operating baseball
pools.
Seawright was culled out in
the court yesterday morning
and failed to answer for trial.
The contempt order for Mr.
Sherman was issued on an af
fidavit offered by William H.
Oates, attorney, wlio appeared
for Seawright on previous occa
sions in the same case. Mr.
Oates said that Seawright was
absent from the court yesterday
without his knowledge and con
sent.
Mr. Oates told the court that
he had been employed by the
defendant Gus Seawright to de
fend him in the case. He recited
the fact that there had been four
continuances, hut that he had
been present and ready for trial
on all occasions.
He said that on last Satur
day he was standing in the Rose
Fharmacy and was approached
by Mr. Sherman, whom he did
not know by name or sight at
that time. He said that Mr. Sher
man asked him if he would
withdraw from the case, and that
he replied that he would with
draw only if asked to do so by
Seawright.
He said that on Monday after
continued on paee four)
SWEDEN WILL
SUPPLY ARMS
UNDER PACT
League Lacking Basis of
Mediation, Fails to
Meet Today
ITALY PROCEEDING
WITH PREPARATIONS
(Copyright, 1935, United Press)
ADDIS ABABA, Aug. 1. (UP).
Making ready to fight for its life
as an independent nation, Ethi
opia today found a friend in Swe
den. A treaty of friendship and
commerce was signed between tho
two nations which is expected ti
lift the ban against the sale of mu
nitions to Ethiopia.
Well informed sources stated
that many Ethiopian troops ar^
gathered on the north, where the
initial Italian attack is expected.
INTERVENTION BY
ENGLAND URGED
LONDON, Aug. 1 (UP).—Sir
Herbert Samuel, leader of the lib
eral party today demanded strong
intervention by England in tho
Italian-Ethiopian dispute during
in important debate on foreign
iffairs in the house of commons.
TODAY'S SESSION AT
GENEVA POSTPONED
GENEVA, Aug. 1. (UP).—Italy
lias refused to accept the Franco
British compromise proposal to
ivert war in Ethiopia and to work
jut a settlement of the dfapute.
The sessipn of the council which
was scheduled for today con«»'
cjuenily wax postponed until to
Ho another plan could b»;
drawn up which might prove sat
isfactory.
ITALIAN YOUTHS
RUSH TO COLORS
HOME. Auk. 1.—(UP).—While
Italian diplomats battled with
lords, at Geneva yesterday, Italian
youths rushed to the colors, ani
ious to fight in the East African
war the League of Nations seeks
to avert.
Preparations for war, apparent
ly ignoring the peace discussions
at Geneva, included decrees creat
ing state monopolies in material*
needed for the conduct of hostili
ties.
Significantly, Italy notified offi
cials of the Sixth International
University games scheduled for
Budapest August 10 to 1!) that
her entries must be cancelled.
Italian athletes are joining the
army, she explained. Italy'** team
of 210 athletes was surpai*ed in
size only by Germany.
The decree creating monopolies
effective August 1, involves two
major categories, coal and the
principal metals.
Connected with war prepara
tions wa» establishment of senii
weekly airmail service between
Italy and Eritrea, East Africa, by
way of Khartoum. The service
will be inaugurated Tuesday at
Asmara.
ENGLANDAUGMENTS
LEGATION GUARD
LONDON, Auk. 1 (UI>).—In
dian troops and six machine gun
ners were ordered to reinforce the
British legation guard it Addis
Ababa last night while Britisn
statesmen labored at Geneva to
avert war between Ethiopia and
Italy. •
Work Relief Officials to Spend Over
Fourth of Fund at the Grass Roots
WASHINGTON, Aug. 1. (UP), of submarginfcl land from cultfva*
The government plans to lend pn- tion within a year, and establifh
vate utility companies $95,000,- needy on more fertile acreage.
000 to supply cheap electricity to Morris L. Cooke, directing ru
at least 351,000 farm families, ral electrification activities, an
Morris Cooke, director of ruralnounced major utility companies
electrification announced here. had reported to him they can use
$113,685,000 in federal loans sup
WASHINGTON, Aug. 1. (UP)
Work-relief officials last night
planned to spend almost $1,500,
000,000 of their $4,000,000,000
employment fund fighting- the de
pression at the nation's grass
roots and creek forks.
Administrator Harry L. Hop
kins is shaping up a $500,000,.
000 secondary road-building pro
gram, employing thousands of un
skilled laborers. Most of the mon
ey will go for wages, little for ma
terial.
Rexford Guy Tugwell, head oi
the rural resettlement division
has another $500,000,000 to us<
for rural rehabilitation. He wil
attempt to retire ft»000,000 acre;
plying $351,000 farm lamuie.-?
with power. «• .
Backing those projects in the
employment drive will be con
struction developments, sewer ex«
tensions, waterworks and sewage
disposal plants—work to give job*
to semi-skilled laborers and pro
fessional people who have migrat
ed to the country since 1929.
They will cost an estimated $400,
. 000,000.
Officials based their $1,500,
000,000 estimate on the fact that
2,100,000 of the five million fam
, ilies receiving aid live in the
! country. Of thut,group, .1,500,000 ,
I have fonHies 'heads who ale not
j farmers, , «, •.
• 1.. ; .Am/, •• .» '*"•

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