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The times-news. [volume] (Hendersonville, N.C.) 1927-current, August 01, 1935, Image 8

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HOW AVERAGE
FAMILY LIVES
IS REVEALED
Social Survey Is Made in
Representative Mid
west Town
By HILLIER KRF.1GHBAUM
WASHINGTON. Aug. I. (L P).
Can your family qualify as a
typical on«' on train street?
A department of commerce
survey of Fargo. N. D., a repre
sentative midwestern town, show
ed that the average fa:nily:
Lives in a wood single family
house.
I'ses » warn air furnace.
Has one bathtub or shower.
L'ses coal for heating and gas
for cooking.
Owns one automobile.
The study of consumer use of
selected goods and services by
various income groups indicated
that families having an income
between $1000 and $ 1 -">00 during
1933 were the greatest market
for these goods. This group in
cluded 21.5 per cent of Hie total.
The survey included 1403 white
families.
More homes equipped with
centra! heating systems, installed'
bathing facilities, gas for cook-1
ing and electricity for lighting
were reported in the families,
whose income ranged between!
$1000 and $1500 than by con
sumers within any of the higher
income classes.
The survey showed that two
out of every three families in
Fargo received incomes of morei
than $1000 during 1933, a year
when the depression was hitting
hard at midwestern sections de
pendent on agricultural prosper
ity.
One out of every 10 families
had incomes of more than $3000,
the survey said, while less than
one per cent of the families re
ceived more than $7000 in in
come during the year.
Slightly more than half of the
families owned their homes. Prac
tically all of the owner-occupants
lived in single family houses
while only two out of every three
families in the tenant group oc
cupied single family homes, the,
rest living in two-family duplexes
or apartments.
SOME FACTS ON INFANTILE
PARALYSIS ARE SUMMARIZED
By DR. OLIVER DAHL
j Poliomyelitis, is not contagi
ous Contrary to the generally
accepted belief, one cannot catch
infantile paralysis, you have to
build it. Xo one has ever proven
it to be a fact that the condition
known as poliomyelitis is an
entity, a specific something, that
can be transmitted to another.
No one ever caught this condi
tion simply by being in the vicin
ity of those who mav be suffer
ing with this condition.
The word poliomyelitis was
coined from the Greek words
polios, Meaning gray, myelos,
meaning marrow plus itis, inflam
mation. in piain English it means
inflammation of the gray mat-!
ter of the spinal cord. By the(
use of these mystifying Greek
words it is easy to have the
a* erage layman conceive the no
tion that poliomyelitis results
from the invasion of a host of
<poi ific germs. Flease dispel such
a notion from your mind, for no
l»?*ctt>riologist has ever isolated
!»n infantile paralysis germ —
there are no such animals. Con
jsefiuently there is nothing about
an infantile paralysis patient for
vou to catch. It would be just
a* reasonable for you to believe
that drunkenness is contagious
and that vour children would be
come drunk by being in the vicin
ity of a group of people that
were paralyzed drunk, as to be
lieve they could contract polio
myelitis by being within a hun
dred miles of a place where there
are supposed to be some chil
dren suffering with this condi
tion.' Drunkenness is just as
contagious as infantile paralysis.
Logan Clendening, M. D., in
his syndicated article, July 25.
1935 says: "Infantile paralysis is
due to a virus, and this, like the
cause of other virus diseases—
smallpox, chickenpox and the
common cold—has not been iso
lated. "Stedman's Medical Dic
tionary" defines the word "virus"
(L. Poison) as: First, Contagium,
the specific poison of an infecti
ous disease; second, vaccine
lymph. There is nothing in the
definition of this word that even
suggests that it is an air borne
contagious entity. We do havt1
I some ill informed M.D.'s who
will tell you that Poliomyelitis is
• contagious for a period of about
J three weeks. It is hard to be
! iieve a reasoning mind can ac
; tually, and honestly believe such
I nonsense, for thousands of times
'children have slept together when
I one of them had infantile paraly
; sis, and the others did not catch
' it. It is a rare' incident that
more than one or two children,
in the same family, are stricken;
although they are in daily con
tact. I have just given you the
definition of poliomyelitis as an
inflammation of the gray mat
ter of the spinal cord.
Just what is there about this
inflammation of the gray matter
of the spinal cord that can be
transmitted to others? How is
any thinking person to believe
that there is a virus that in some
way causes inflammation in the
gray matter of the spinal cord
of infants when this supposed to
be virus has never been isolated?
It is but a hypothetical some
thing. A reasoning mind could
better, believe that the moon is
made of cheese, for the moon at
least has the shape and color of
cheese. No one has ever seen,
smelt nor felt, nor in any other
way isolated this supposed to be
poliomyelitis virus. I.et us sup
pose for the sake of argument
that there is such a virus. Then,
what produces this virus? It also
must have a cause! I have
shown where a medical diction
ary defines "virus" as 2. a vac
cine lymph. Now this may give
us some clue to the real cause of
infantile paralysis. Let us now
see what has been said on this
subject by the greatest medical
authorities in the world, — not
some of our small town doctors.
Sir William Osier,—who wrote
some of the text books being
studied in the medical schools of
our country, today, under the
heading "Transmission of Disease
by Vaccination," Osier savs:
"Syphilis has undoubtedly been
transmitted by vaccination." Un
der the heading "Influence of
Vaccination upon other Diseases,"
he says: "A quiescent malady
may be lighted into activity by
vaccination. This happens with
congenital syphilis, occasionally
with tuberuclosis may occur and
9
try Gulf 3 weeks
IN THE "TRAFFIC COURT"
Wanted: a fair trial
If it's been some time since you've used
Gulf, try it 3 short weeks—and then give us
your verdict.
Put it on trial in traffic. Starts. Crawls.
Get-aways. C limbs. There's no fairer test—
and we think you'll confirm a judgment
that's already been handed down . . .
750 Turned Judges
W: went to owners ot" average cars—
750 of them. We asked them to compare
Gulf with their regular brands—judge it on
(1) mileage, (2) starting, (3) pick-up, (4)
power, (5) all-around performance.
Gulf Won the Verdict!
At the end of the trial, 7 out of 10 voted
Gulf superior on one or more of the 5 counts—
ma try on all five.
Reason? Controlled refining makes Gulf
5 good gasolines in one. Gives it not only 2 or
3—but all five qualities of a perfect gasoline.
Start off with a tankful of That Good Gulf
today. In three weeks, you'll be an addict!
GULF REFINING COMPANY
What tip on "pick-up" can cut down
. gasoline bills?
You'll find the answer to
this question in this free
Gulf booklet, plus 14
other helpful hints on
gasoline economy. Drive
in and get your free copy
today at the Sign of the
Orange Disc.
FREE-AT ALL GULF DEALERS!
be followed by hemiplegia."
(Paralysis of one side of the
body). In the "Lancet," th«» lead
ing British medical journal, of
September 4, 1926, it sets forth
accounts of seven cases of
encephalo-myelitis (inflammation
of the brain and spinal cord, and
their membranes) following vacci
nation, in two London hospitals.
Prof. H. M. Thurnbull and Prof.
Jas. Mcintosh who painfully and
carefully investigated these cases
stated in the British Journal of
Experimental Pathology, from
which the "Lancet" quotes, that:
"There can be no doubt' that vac
cination was a definite causual
factor." Dr. Herbert M. Sheiton
in his book, "Hygenic care of
Children," page " 375 says: "In
11934 there were recorded in
England and Wales 5039 cases
of ensephalitis lethargia, 397 of
cerebro-spinal fever, 777 acute
poliomyelitis,—ii} 1922-23-24 the
doctors of England and Wales
cooked up a number of smallpox
scares, causing 288,000 revacci
nations were followed by this
extra crop of sleepy sickness."
May I add also the extra 777
cases of infantile paralysis. The
renort of the "Commission of
Smallpox and Vaccination of the
Health Organization of the Lea
gue of Nations," August 27,
1928, says: "The post-vaccinal
encephalitis with which we arc
dealing has become a problem in
itself, mainly in consequence of
the events of the last few years
in the Netherlands and England
and Wales. In each of these
countries the cases which have
occurred have been sufficiently
numerous and similar to require
them to be considered collective
ly. Their occurence has led to
the realization that a new, or at
least a previously unsuspected or
unrecognized, risk attaches to th ;
practice of vaccination." Julia
Motley, age 12, Irishburg, Va..
died of accute infantile paralysis
which seized her three weeks aft
er she had been vaccinated.
Space nor times does not per
mit or I would give you other
quotations from eminent mcdical
men. Bear in mind the casual
factors, in the - production of
poliomyelitis and ihe other spinal
cord inflammations, outlined
above is the work of our most
eminent allopathic physicians.
(M D's.), not mine.
I am a Naturopathic physician.
(N. . D.) and shall now give you
my idea of the CAUSE of poli
omyelitis. As this word means
an inflammation of the gray mat
ter of the spinal cord, remem
ber that inflammation follows ir
ritation. We have been told by
some of the, medical profession
that this inflammation of the
gray matter of the spinal cord
is caused by a virus. In Web
ster's dictionary we find—Virus
(L-. a slimy or poisonous liquid,
poison, stench). Now what do
you suppose CAUSES this "slimy
or poisonous liquid, poison,
tench", to form in bodies of
these children' who come down
with infantile paralysis? Prim
arialy wrong class and combina
tion of foods, enervating habits,
plus vaccination and inoculations,
as has been attested to, by the
1 greatest medical men in the
world, as 1 have shown. Remem
ber, folks, the food you eat and
the air you breathe is the ma
: terial from which your blood is
i built. We arc a bicellular type
| of animal that breaks down about
'seven million cells per second
when we are inactive—naturally
I much more when active. The
residue from this cellular activ
ity must be eliminated from the
body if we are to maintain the
j condition known as health. When
' this waste matter has not been
thrown off, but accumulates in
' the body, one becomes DIS-eased.
' The body is out of ease. The
| living habits of (he stricken chil
j dren are responsible for thej»;
abnormalties. You never heard
f of a case of infantile paralysis
(in a child that was fed according
I to the naturopathic idea of feed
! ing and care. Poliomyelitis and
j other degenerative diseases occur
in the ill advised families who
; feed their children such irritants
I—that cause internal inflamma
tion—as coffee, tea, chocolate,
I cocoa, commercial ice creams,
(white sugar products such as
candies pastries, spiced and pick
led foods, eggs and other putri
factive foods, or wrong combi
nations of foods; too much ex
citement, late hours and other
enervating habits plus vaccina
tion and suppressive inocula
tions. (As evidenced by the emi
nent physicians I have just quot
ed). These are the influences
that lay the foundation for in
fantile paralysis, as well as other
degenerative DIS-ease. The ex
citing factors are usually sud
den atmospheric changes, canned
or badly leached or withered
vegetables or fruits, impure
water.
I have receiver! inquiries numi
people in several Southern dis
tricts as to whether or not it
would bo safe for them to bring
their children to Hendersonville
and vicinity. My reply has al-1
ways been in the affirmative, and1
as a result we now have sev
eral people here that were plan-J
ning to go elsewhere. Please
weigh the facts set forth in this!
articie and you will realize that
it is far safer for you to bringi
your children to the glorious!
mountains of Western North Car
olina—Hendersonville and vicin-l
ity in particular—than to stay at!
home where you have enervating
heat, poor water, leached and i
withered vegetables and fruits,
and perhaps other DIS-ease pro-;
ducing environment. I feel safe,
in stating that your own state j
is not free from infantile paraly
sis. If the truth was known and j
you are now likely living much|
closer to some case of infantile!
paralysis than you wouid be i f»
you were here in Hendersonville.1
North Carolina. If you want to |
Hve your children the very best
protection against the develop
ment. of infant:le paralysis and,
other degenerative PIS-ease, then
Would Locate 120
Planes At Miami
I
1
Is Recommendation of De
fense Bill Author
WASHINGTON, Aug. 1. (UP).
I/ocation of a full wing of army,
aircraft—120 planes—at Miami,1
has been recommended by Repre-,
sentative J. Mark Wilcox, D.,i
Fla., author of the air defense,1
bili which has received final leg-j
islative sanction in the senate. i
The Wilcox bill, which goes to|
the White House for the presi-j
dent's signature, provides for the
establishment of six frontier air
defense bases, but leaves selec-J
tion of the specific sites to the
war department.
The proposed Miami base would
be in the South Eastern arib
bean area. The five other areas
mentioned in the bill are, north
east, comprising the New Eng
land states; northwest, composed J
of Oregon and Washington ;i
Alaska, the Rocky Mountain re-'
Igion and the Southeastern
states.
Wilcox said he hoped for favor
able consideration by the war de-1
partment of his plan to locate a.
large base at Miami, for which
initial funds could bp obtained!
from the public works adminis-'
tration. ,
bring them to Hendersonville, I
North Carolina, where you can
mingle with some of the very
best people from other state*?
who come here to spend the
summer. Our own citizens are
as fine as can be found any
where. We offer you wonder
fully invigorating mountain air,
pure, limpid waters from our
mountain streams. The very best
of fruits and vegetables, rich in
the organic mineral salts so neces
sary for normal health. Accord
ing to the records of our County
Health Officer, we haven't had
a case of infantile paralysis in
this city or county for over three
years. Can you say as much for
your county? The best of the
land awaits you at Henderson
ville, North Carolina.
$7 FLIVVER STOLEN
POUGHKEEKSIE. N.Y., Aug j
1.— (UP)—Ray Billows, New
York state amateur golf cham
pion, reported to police today that
his $7 "Flivver" had been stolen.
Ray said he was anxious to have !
the car recovered as he wants to |
enter the National amateur tourn- 1
anient at Cleveland next month. I
Since the present congress con
vened twenty-eight flags . above
the canital have been worn out |
by the wind. Still, the result mitrht
have been the same inside.
ADMINISTRATOR'S NOVICE
Having tjuclified as administra- j
top of the estate of Mrs. Elmira i
^ItC Qltic. ^)unrv4
irv neur moA/urv^ ^.<
CPoW 573
COOL, yet not too plain, the ruffle sleeves and rever* mik* j,
a pertly attractive dress. Make it of percale or eingham pj'
terns are available in sizes 14 to 20 and 32 to 4-. Size Kr*in
i 1-4 yards of 35-inch fabric and 7-8 yard contrast.
Tj secure a PATTERN and STEP-BY-STEP SKWKc &
STRUCTIONS, fill out the coupon below, being 3ure to MBm
THK NAME OF THIS NEWSPAPER.
To secure a PATTERN and STEP-BY-STEP SEWING I.VJTtfc
TIONS, fill out the coupon below, being sure to mention The Tito
News.
JULIA BOYD. 103 PARK AVENUE, NEW YORK
■ i|
Enclosed is 15 cents in coin for ' - ' • '1
' ♦
Pattern No. Size - I.
Name Address
City Staf ; )
"J&me of this newspaper
Address your envelope to Julia Boyd, Timea-News RurtiaJ
Park Avenue, New York City, N. Y.
J. Miller, deceased, this is to
notify all persons having; claims
against said estate to present
them to the undersigned on or
before June 26, 1936, or this
notice will he pleaded in bar of
recovery. AM persons lWW
to said estate will pfeisf *1
settlement at once with
dersigned. This June 2*. *
N. W. MIL1.KR. Ar
6-27-Thrc*
WifWMSW.> —
AFTER THAT SWIM
<s>
COSH, AFTER A SWIM |g
LIKE THAT THERE'S ONLY ~
ONE THING I WANT
...A LUCKY.
if
Jm ucrun xrvXt ffuortcL
*-r*fiicky SfciJit
■ «■ .
AFTER THAT SWIM,
I M your best friend,
f I AM YOUR LUCKY STRIKE.
Ik • t
■■ „
ITS THE TOBACCO THAT COUNTS
TP ' ; t ,
There are no finer tobaccos than those used in Luckies
Cop,,Utof 1*35.
• i r< i_l I

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