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X THE TIMES-NEWS
Hendersonville News Established in 1894
Headenonville Times Established in 1881
Published every afternoon except, Sunday at 227
North Main Street, Hendersonville, N. C., by The
Times-News Co., Inc., Owner and Publisher.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
By Times-News Carrier, in Hendersonville, or else
where, per week * 12c
Due to high postage rates, the subscription price
of The Times-News in zones above No. 2 will be
based on the cost of postage.
Entered as second class matter at the post office
in Hendersonville, N. C.
SATURDAY, MARCH 19, 1938
BIBLE THOUGHT"
WHEN SAVAGES ARE SAVED
"Drink Not Mine" (Judges 13:4.)
Dr. J. S. Paton said that the savage inhabitants
of the New Hebrides cultivate a plant from which
»s made intoxicating drink. But as soon they ac
cent Christianity they dig up the root, bring them
together and burn them in a groat fire. They all
become, as a matter of course total abstainers.
J. T. FAIN
C. M. OGLE
HENRY ATKIN
Editor
Managing Editor
City Editor
—Sunday School Chronicle.
WHICH WAY, AMERICANS?
We quote a sentence from the writings of
Walter Lippman for the daily press:
"Nothing can keep a nation free except
the conviction of its people that they would
rather die than be slaves."
That was the conviction which enabled
the people of the American colonies to ob
tain their freedom and that conviction has
enabled this country to live and flourish for
mjore than 150 years. Devotion to this con
vi^tion and the principles upon which it is
bised, together with the power of the ideals
it| has established in American character,
h&s made this nation great, has made it in
mjany things a model for all the nations of
the earth. In addition the American social
system and American application of the
laws of economics. American industrial and
business policies, have all made major con
tributions to the progress and prosperity of
a country which has astonished civilization
with its magnificent development.
And all the while, throughout its history,
the United States has been the foremost'
nation of the world in its devotion to liberty,
in devotion to the principle that the highest,
best and greatest development of a nation is
to be achieved through the highest and best
development of the character of the indivi
dual, and this is cmly.to,be achieved through
the freedom of the individual and the un
trammelled and boundless opportunity for
achievement, progress and development of
the individuial which has characterized
I
American life.
Today, with a large area of the world
groggy, dazed and tottering from the
assaults which destructive forces are hurl
ing against the free nations of the earth, i
against individual liberty and inalienable
lights, against democratic forms of govern
ment, this nation is in the most secure posi
tion, no doubt, of all the countries in the
world. It is in a favorable geographical
position; and despite the beatings it has
taken in depression and recession and the
mistakes and failures which have ensued
from effcirts to correct such conditions, this
country is still able to withstand some
severe jolts and overcome some unfavorable
experiences. No other country of the world
is so strong and so well able to meet the
crisis which faces civilization.
Nearly all the nations of the earth lack
the natural and financial resources which
the United States possesses in great abund-'
ance. Otherwise, no doubt, the next world
war would have by this time been in full
blast. Lack of financial resources to wage
a world war is believed by some ostute ob
servers to be the chief reason for the halt
ing attitude of certain countries which
want to start trouble and of countries which
would quickly oppose them with force were
their financial condition better.
In the midst of impending and danger
ous world conditions, however the Ameri
can nation will remain free if its people
show the will to preserve their freedom. It
they have the convictijn that they would
rather die than become the slaves of Com
munism, Fascism or some other alien ism,
they can preserve the freedom and the
country which have been theirt throughout
the entire history of the American nation.
Liberty loving citizens of this country,
who value the heritage handed down by-«
their fathers, will write the words (or sim
ilar words) of Walter Lippman over their
door-posts and upon the. tablets of their
hearts—
"Nothing can keep a nation free except'
the conviction of its people that they would
rather die than be slaves."
Unless we misread the signs of the times
the day has come in which much more than
lip service must be given to this fundamen
tal principle of freedom. It must be de
clared as a fundamental principle, our peo
ple must rally to it as such and must defend
» it, no matter what the cost.
i NEWSPAPERS' OPINIONS
:!
THE NORTH CAROLINA REPUBLICANS
Whatever may be thought of the action of thi
Republican State convention here in writing it
platform and assorting its political leaders for tin
various present and prospective offices and post
j of responsibility, there must be agreement that tlv
1 body was exceedingly wise and strategic in its pro
motion of Hon. Jake F. Newell to'the chairmanshi]
of the organization in North Carolina.
Mr. Newell is a patriot and a Christian gentle
; man, and while, of course, he is thorough-going an<
forthright in his opposition to the present Demo
. cratic party's principles and policies and command
' ing office holders, we hold to the conviction tha
he is, first of all. an American before he is i
■ partisan.
| And we devoutly hope that he will not para
mount his political partisanship.
For that matter, it is time for all strictly party
men to lay aside their intensities and prejudice:
and face the situation which prevails already, am
threatens to prevail in the future, with a vision un
impaired or colored by personal political or sec
tional bias.
Some critical questions press themselves in upoj
the intelligence and patriotic judgment of tht
people of this country at this moment.
Personalities are, relatively, of little importance
but principles make the difference between the lift
and death of a republic.
We are not in agreement with the expressed con
victions of Republican leaders that the presenl
national leadership has determinedly set out upor
a course of action that would create a dictator
ship.
But we are not at all sure but that, if the pres
en trends are continued, America will race on to
wards the equivalent at least of dictatorial govern
ment, whatever name one may wish to apply.
Those trends are upon the responsibilities of th»
sovereign citizenship of America.
This citizenship can stop them or ncceleiat<
them.
Our more unhealthy fear at times is that they
these Americans individual citizens, are not inter
ested in sufficient numbers to arrest these ten
dencies to the point of'returning to the old model
of democracy.
Furthermore, one finds statesmen in Americt
today who are wondering if civilization has not be
come so complex as to make it mandatory to casl
aside the old traditions and processes of democracy
—and find some other way of government.
This newspaper may occasionally share that in
stability of faith itself, but it has not abandoned
the hope that every desirable and virtuous objec
tive that is within the range of what has come to
be known as the New Deal and can be reached
within the old framework of the democratic pro
CCSS6S.
What the Republicans of North Carolina may
amount to under the leadership of Mr. Newell in
the way of impressing their platform and purposes
and policies upon the people of the f?tate will bt
awaited with interest.
It is certain, however, that under agile and ver
satile leadership of Mr. Newell, the party will be
militant and dynamic, and will go to the maximum
oi its attainable goals upon the mofticatum of hi?
honest and intelligent as well as aggressive guid
ance.—Charlotte Observer.
WAY OF THE DICTATOR
While the world was wondering what the Austri
an plebiscite would develop, Hitler moved German
troops into Austria, stopped the referendum, forc
ed the resignation of the chancellor and seized con
trol of the Nation.
France and England, jealous of the rights of
democracies, were unable to cope with the speed
of the Hitler program. Mild protest could they
make but that's all. They could stop the invasion.
This seizure of Austria is typical.
Dictators, given power at home, consider them
selves thus entitled to use the same force abroad.
Mussolini did it in Ethiopia; Hitler does it in
Austria.
To this date it seems the Austnans will submit
to the German authority but who can tell how long
this state of affairs will continue ?
If Hitler did not fear the Austrian independence
why did he seize the reins so quickly? And if
majority sentiment does favor independence can he
long control the Austrians?
The episode is loaded with dynamite; there's no
denying that right now Europe is as close to war a?
she has been since 1918. Perhaps Hitler's troops
can crush Austria to such an extent that war will bo
averted; perhaps this authority will serve to flash
the Austrian discontent into open warfare.
Dictators become power-crazed. They are born
of excitement and must ever present excitement to
retain their power.
Thats' why Italy and Germany talk much about
their future war plans. Hitler and Mussolini dare
not permit the people to resume normal living.
They must rattle the sabre to feed the discontent
upon which their future is builded.—Concord Her
ald-Tribune. ^ r
IT S "REALISM" ALL RIGHT FOR AUSTRIANS
Whether the United States will recognize the
union of Austria and Germany, and recall our am
bassador from Vienna, will depend, it is said, upon
whether this territorial change has been accom
plished by armed intervention. If the Austrians
agree to the union by vote in the approaching
plebiscite. Uncle Sam will have to regard it as a
"voluntary" union and "recognize" accordingly.
And Herr Hitler, as The Statesville Daily says,
"is attending to that. When the Austrians go to
the polls to express themselves they will vote al
most as one for union with Germany, for to refuse
would mean another 'purge' that would leave
bumph heads and economic isolatiqn. The election
will simply mean the same unanimity that was
expected for the plebiscite that was scheduled for
last Sunday, but it will be the other way around.
"This overrunning of Austria was encouraged by
Hitler's earlier successes in scrapping agreements.
It could have been avoided if France and England
had stood firm at the start: it could have been
avoided if there had been a 'thou shalt not* to Italy
when Mussolini was about to rape Etfiiopia. The
European democracies see thut now—Lbut it is too
late. And thus England's Mr. Chamberlain is see
ing his 'reahsm' for just what it is."—Concord
Times.
Anent this indicated reduction in gas rates, why
not extend it to iuclude congressional pay?
PERHAPS
-1 Ati' G£NTl£Mcn^
^p&tUHGTON WOfi/PEf?
&#^THeJ!L°C
inOfOOT PAM ~ p
rne very eorroM or /?
seeth/zvc tt?A/r/fVm?s~y
AHP COME OP W/j-//
tyCTS /<v f//$~ y
+
LIFE DAY BY DAY
- By W1CKES WAMBOLDT _
J Every now and then we hear
some person say that he is going'
i to do this or that pleasant thin#
when his "ship comes in." But
has he sent a
ship out'.' And if
he has not sent
a ship out, why
should he expect
a ship to come
in for him?
Whenever a
man's ship comes
in, it is because
thai man sent a
ship out.
We hear per
sons talking with
pleasurable ar. -
ticipation of * a
better world to
wnicn int*y
Wamboldt pect to go. But
• what have they done and what
I are they doing to hi themselves
for a better world? Probably no
i person need expect to go to a bet
ter world unless he is worthy.
Even in this world unworthy per
sons rarely rise to choice posi
tions—except in politics.
There is one line in a. negro
I spiritual which might give many
of us pause for thought: "Every
body t-alkin' 'bout lleb'm ain't
! gwine dar."
RIDING FOR A FALL
Paul V. McNutt, high commis
sioner of the Philippines, in Wash
i ington to report to' President
Roosevelt on the situation in the
far east, said the four horsemen.
, Murder, Loot, Rape and Destruc
tion, are riding in China.
I And the whole wojrld knows the
| nationality of those four horse
men.
WE RISE TO INQUIRE
Japan has issued a proclamation j
assuring immortality to such of
I her soldiers as die for their coun
try.
Couldn't our churches properly
promise immortality to such of
our politicians as serve our coun
try patriotically and honestly?
BU I A L> A Y
Alexander Feodorovich Keren
ski, former premier of Russia,
who on his recent arrival in the
United States, declared that tho
reign of the dictators would end
shortly, showed displeasure when
a reporter inconsiderately asked
him if he hadn't made a Similar
prediction while he was here elev
en years ago. Hut what is eleven
years in the life of a two-billion
year-old world?
COMPENSATION
Quillan says the less hair the
less dandruff. Uncle Remus re
minds us that trouble is seasoning
—persimmons aren't jjood till
they avo frost-bit.
VERMONT IS LOSING
OLD CHEESE CRAFT
MOUNT HOLLY, Vt. (UP)—A
simple legend—"Homo of Crow
ley Cheese—No Dogs Allowed"—
modestly tells of this town's chief
claim to fame.
For the days of hand cheese
making in Vermont is fast pass
ing. Crowley's cheese factory,
opreated by four generations of
the family, is the sole survivor of I
six factories here.
George Crowley assisted by (
Prince Robert continues the same
policies inaugurated by Winfield,
Crowley, who built the three-story
factory in 1880. As No. 1 cheesej
taster he has eaten .'5,276 pounds j
of the factory's product in his '12
years experience.
The factory used 93(5,504 '
pounds of milk to produce 93,936
pounds of "stirred" cheese last j
year.
PEACE BOARD "IN BLACK" I
TOLEDO (UP)—The Toldedo
Industrial Peace Board finished
the year 1937 with a balance of
$571 in its budget. Edmund G.
Ruffin, director, has reported that
the board spent only $6,679 dur
ing the year out of an original ap
propriation of $7,250.
! by Mrs. uaynor Maaaox |
5EA Serrlce Staff Writer
i ?OME like their curry hot. Oth
^ ers want it to taste like some
hSng else. Here's a good com
promise—round steak with a mild
nock curry sauce. Inexpensive
ind tastes iike an India love lyric
I vhen served with a mound of
itcamed rice.
Curried Round Steak
(Serves 4 to 6)
One and one-half pounds of
5 ground round steak, 1 medium
:>nion, 1-2 clove garlic, 1-2 tea
ipoon ground ginger, 1 tablespoon
rurry powder, 2 tablespoons but
ter, 3 tablespoons flour, 2 cups
milk, 1-2 cup cubed raw apple,
•alt and pepper.
md garlic. He*t
anion ana ganic and fry urtil
brown. Add ginger and curry
powder and chopped meat. Stir
. meat continually until it is thor
oughly browned. Slowly stir in
milk. Simmer 1-2 hour. Add
^ubed apples and sift in flour.
Simmer another 15 minutes, add
ing more milk if necessary. Add
-alt and pepper after removing
trom stove. Pass a small bowl of
coarsely chopped peanuts with
ihe curry.
Here's another variation of a |
well known kitchen theme. It
cuts costs without cutting any joy
out of living.
Beef Liver in Casserole
(Serves 4 to 6)
One and one-half pounds Lee£
saucepan. Arid
Monday's Menu
BREAKFAST: Sliced bana
nas and sliced fresh dates,
brown sugar and cream, hom
iny muffins, crisp bacon, cof
fee, milk.
LUNCHEON: Tomato juice,
corned beef hash, poached
egg, Boston brown bread,
baked apple, tea, milk.
DINNER: Curried round
steak, chopped peanuts, steam
ed brown rice, green peas,
lettuce and grapefruit salad,
strawberry Bavarian, coffee,
milk.
liver, l-H pouna sau pone, i large
onion, 3 large carrots, 2 stalks
celery, 1 cup medium sour cream,
salt, pepper, cayenne, flour.
Slice onlcn, carrots and celery.
Cut liver into 6 pieces. Cut salt
pork into small slivers. Soak liver
in salted cold water for 1-2 hour,
drain and then rinse in ice water.
Drain and dry. Roll in flour. Fry
liver in bacon fat until browned
on both sides. Arrange slices in
casserole and scatter salt pork
over them. Cover liver and salt
pork with the vegetables. Sprin
kle with seasoning dust lightly
with flour. Add just enough boil
ing water to cover. Bake in mod
erate even (350 degrees F.) until
liver is tender, about 1 1-2 hours.
Stir in sour cream, mix well, and
bake another 10 or 15 minutes.
Have a few fat baked potatoes at
hand to help you celebrate.
Wait a Minute
By NOAH HOLLOWELL
}
HYBRID :.C6RN:^Do g w o od
blouui tinu? is< about here* and 1
am •wondt-Hhg'if you will plant a
little hybrid seed corn this year in j
an effort to increase production .
from 15 to 25 per cent. Hybrids,
which it is believed will be adapt-!
ed to this section, are advertised
by local seedsmen. . . j
SECOND-HAND LUMBER: As |
I was strolling yesterday and saw
the signs of recently razed houses,:
I wondered why uninhabited, di- j
lapidated ones were not torn J
down, especially with the view to ;
getting a lower tax assessment on j
unimproved property. Then I
wondered why some one did not
make a specialty of wrecking old I
houses and offering the salvaged i
materials for sale. Next 1 wan
dered upon Govan Hyder, who
was busy erecting ji high board
fench and upon inquiry as to its;
purpose, was advised that he was
making a specialty of tearing i
down old houses and offering sal
vaged parts for sale at his newly,
established 990 North Cherry I
street. I
N. C. "JOGFRY" TEST: Dan
bury was in the recent headlines
for erroneous arrest of a preacher
in the midwest, who was brought,
to Danbury to answer for a crime
of long ago. Hands up from all 1
who upon first guess can tell what I
North Carolina county has Dan
bury as the county seat. Never
heard of it, eh? Well, don't tell—
the town of Danbury or the coun
ty of Stokes.
PRUNE GRAPE VINES: If
you expect to prune grape vines
this year, don't delay because;
they are "bleading" badly. A lit
tle bleeding; doesn't seem to in
jure them but I never thought
Nature intended a grape vine as 1
a siphon water out of the ground.
If you want nice grapes, prune.
If you are used to pruning you
are puzzled as to how. If you
don't want to study the various
systems and yet desire to prune,
try this simple method, which will
bleed your heart as well as the
vine:
The canes that grew last year
are the yellow ones on which bore
the grapes. Cut these back to
only one bud to each cane. That
will break your heart, but it's a
fairly safe method for the novice.
This bud will throw out a cant'
with one, two or three nice
bunches of grapes, depending on
fertility of soil and variety of
vine. Delay in pruning may
cause injury to your vines.
FRIDAY, MARCH 18.
Maximum—G8 degrees. Mini
mum—39 degrees. Mean—53.5
degrees. Day's range—29 de
grees.
WOOD CARVING TAUGHT
BERKELEY, Cal. (UP)—Wood i
carving is undergoing such a ver
itable renaissance, especially _ in
the western states where fine
woods are cheap, that the Univer
sity of California has inaugurat
ed a wood carving course for
adults.
LETTERS TO
THE EDITOR
NOTE—No unsigned commu
nications arc published by The
Times-News. All letters must be
signed with Ihe real name of
the author. No communications
signed with a fictitious name j
will be published.—EDITOR.
Editor, The Times-News:
I
I here has been much comment '
on taxation in the last twelve ;
month-:. A clipping1 enclosed I'roni ,
the State Magazine should be of
interest to the voters of Hender
son county.
Betw cen the first and second i
primaries two years ago Governor
Iloey halfway promised, if elect
ed, to eliminate the s-ales tax and !
not iaiso property taxes. But ha> !
it? ^ I
In some instances, taxes were t
more than doubled in 1!J37, prov
ing that the "State" was correct
it) the following surmise:
"Would The State, continues
.Mr. Nettles, make up the lost
revenue by a sales tax "the bulk
of which would come out of the
tenant farmer, the textile worker,
and our other low wage earners?"
This question, in keeping with the
lattei part of the preceding one.
again presupposes the total j
amount of tax revenue must re
main unlowered. None the less,
The State is glad to answer. No,;
this newspaper has not advocated '
anil does not advocate a general j
sales tax. There are two, at least
two, strong arguments against
I
siit-h tax. o>,
Ut' paid i„" ;r
the .« ti.4
™ ' >. Ira- T,J
ably w111;' ■ " "V-c- tav.*
' *•. J'lt 5 . f i
Gi'iiijy <,j ,,t|j • "T- in the
a now tax n - ,! f- Too
lal1
lux I
a roii
that
Hondoi
KENTUCK V GIR! K
«wf«a as d5J
NEW YORK
the i«x<>t'( .(■
Spain, t'l.i. ;i. ;
<lin. has <!i-r ...
Mi.Mvs J{;i .r-ii
os ol I.mil-•
"no pub!i.sh«*<i
a textbool <
■Sh- ,ai,j sh
Ijii.MSri' ji
appearance
l'riomls iii[i
would t a
IO WRITE tU\F.RTo
PII1LA1
ui'i l:. i'- 1 • ^J
of
r J
(;hu«"' l. '1 M<tJ
CuinpwM : . i'l ••• I r.E^t
(M'i'to.
PLAGUK HITS iNDFAHjl
OTTAWA 'M-, ,
vat'.- 'i3
from tubt.-i- - ' ijqT
hijth a- 11 ' • ' ;•«
tiou Ij'-cii ; •' "
cal 1 ' I
.1. \U< • •: 'l
adiau Tubon .. ciuial
This Curious World £w*]
• ^ ^
T&JC^t£GL
CAN
EXZ/LL. HOI-IT^
IN ,
o>.s7^e
&H£=U-ZS
VW . M iTS TEETH.
COP*. 1933 BV NE* SERVICE. INC.
ARRJVES 7E^
org /•• /* y
MARCH- 21 ST
/:42 A.M.
BUT IF THE
EARTH'S AXIS
SUDDEN:.:/ bECAV£
PERPENCHCDLfiA
TO THE PuA\E
OF ITS 0<.?T,
WE WOULD HAVE
AO 14A/2/4770V
OT SEASONS
AND OCR
DAVS AND IMrSHTS
VJOULO BE EQUAL
THROUGHOUT THE
£"/V77/0£~ S&Z.
kMflfMMiMMfl
IN GERMANY
SOAP is e£lNCj MADE
from COAL/
THE sun, which has been moving northward through the 4
since l.'st December, crosses the equator in the early
hours <-f March 21 and, according to convention, tin*, marks fi
beginning of spring, or the vernal equinox.
Folklore Heroine"]
HORIZONTAL
1 Abused
heroine of a
fairy tale.
9 She was a
ragged
overworked
13 Strong
vegetable.
14 Grief.
15 Demigoddess
of fate.
16 To trudge.
18 Loves.
!0 Parent.
51 Cow's call.
!3 Poem.
14 Plural
pronoun.
16 Writing fluid.
:8 Roves.
11 Measure of
cloth.
12 Action.
:4 Her
godmother
transformed
her into a
well-dressed
beauty.
5 Chinese sedge
6 To doze.
8 2000 pounds.
Answer to Previous Puzzle
39 Drone Dee.
40 Within.
42 Stomach.
44 Chest bone.
45 Spain.
4G Driving '
command.
48 Musical note,
49 Devoured.
50 Removed
hulls.
52 Tree.
54 Three united.
55 Polishes.
56 Snake.
, 58 She was the
belle at the
prince's
D¥ r asi.
60 Compound
ether.
VERTICAL
1 Companv.
2 Mad.
3 Insect'.'? e/?p.
4 Destiny.
5 To enrich.
C Female sheep.
7 Behold.
8 Meadow.
9 Had on.
10 Form of "be."
11 Affront.
12 Musical note.
15Bo*f. t . .
17 WaSte sp6>x>
■ ■ ■ r
in a mitt
19 Flat-botM
boat.
20 She left -
prir.ce st
22 Ca£t of a
!r.ngua|c.
2 j The pri»C
found her
through he
lost — W
27 Cogr.:Z'>n&
29 Wood cfS
30 Sea t'ofr
31 Organ of
hearing
33 Stream
ol'tr'JcUOL
35 Crowd
37 Head of»
person.
39 Flat rour.d
piste.
41 pertaining
;< r.ervcus
svstcW
- Bi"*>adfr.
Hor-ef ho*
4 To ,er'°:Li
49 Mature Pj
51 Mineral j®
•v Kp-jchS
f>7 And
5(j To exist
— !.n l\\J

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