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THE TIMES-NEWS
H«ader*oarill« N«w« Established la 18M
Haid«rtoavill« TIbm EitobKiktd ia 1881
Published every afternoon except Sunday at 227
North Mais Street, HendereonTille, N. C., by The
Times-News Co., Inc., Owner and Publisher.
J. T. FAIN Editor
C. M. OGLE Managing Editor
HENRY ATKIN City Editor
TELEPHONE 87
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
By Times-^ews Carrier, in HendenonviUe, or else
where, per week 12c
Doe to high postage rates, the subscription price
of The Times-News in zones above No. 2 will be
based on the cost of postage.
Entered as second class matter at the post office
fe Hendersonvilie, N. C.
TUESDAyToCTOBBR 11, 1938
BIBLE THOUGHT
IS THE LORD YOUR SHEPHERD?
A little child had difficulty memorizing the first
verse of the Twenty-third Psalm and she finally
got it this way: "The Lord is mjr Shepherd: that'a
all I want." If we know the Shepherd, that is all
we need or want. For this is Life Victorious, to
know the Shepherd, who is meeting every need.
"The LORD is my Shepherd"
"The Lord IS ray Shepherd"
"The Lord is MY Shepherd"
"The Lord is my SHEPHERD"
—S. S. Times.
WHEN BETTER TIMES COME BUSINESS
WILL BRING THEM
What helps Business helps you.
This is true no matter who you are,
where you live in the United States, what
you are doing, or if you happen not to be
doing anything.
When better times come Business will
bring them.
This is as true as the first proposition
and is as widespread in its application.
In view of these truths and facts the
common-sense, practical course for all citi
zens of this country who are interested in
their own and the general welfare, would
seem to be to show some interest in the
condition of business, in the progress and
success of business, in giving business a
fair showing and ample opportunity to go
ahead.
If what helps Business helps every indi-l
vidual and the people of the nation as a
whole, then helping Business ought to be'
everybody's business. It ought to be the;
cjiief concern of individuals and of all
groups and classes.
When better times come Business will
bring them.
The country has had eight years of ef
fort to change conditions and bring in the
era of better times by other methods, ex
periments, schemes, tricks; by talk, propa-1
ganda, ballyhoo; by efforts to compel the
country to lift its total weight by its own
bootstraps—and last, but not least, the al
leged best bet of all, the expenditure of
around TWENTY-FIVE THOUSAND MIL
LION DOLLARS of public money on the
experiments, tricks and sleight-of-hand
performances.
What is the sum total of results?
Business has not been helped. It has
been hurt to the extent of the loss of bil
lions of dollars to every line of business
and industry in the country, the loss fall
ing on owners and management and work
ers. In fact, many businesses throughout
the country have been done to death by the
policies which have prevailed during the
past eight years; and many others are be
ing slowly strangled.
Better times have not returned to the
country.
Billions of the country's capital, which
makes it possible to carry on, do business
and expand its business and prosper, has
disappeared. It has gone with the wind. It
has been dissipated and destroyed by the
controlling policies of the nation.
Another proof that better times have not
returned is the.fact that unemployment of
workers is said to be now the largest since
the depression started in 1929. The num
ber of unemployed is greater than at the
beginning of the depression or at any time
in the past eight years—at least, it is said
that the number of persons on relief meas
ures the total of unemployed and that the
figures make this showing.
After eight or nine years of the sort of
experiences the country has had, it seems
that all intelligent, right-thinking people
would be convinced that what helps Busi
ness helps the country — that the only
course that will help the country is that of
helping Business—and
When better times come Business will
bring them.
"Japan Friendly to Poland," reads a
headline. Well, friends of peace, there're
two countries for a starter, anyway.
There's a mouse in a midwest garage
whose bosom friends so far have been two
cats. If the mouse hasn't been named yet,
we suggest "Prague."
NEWSPAPERS' OPINIONS
MAKING A RACKET OF IT
Revelations in the current issue of Collier's
Magazine allege that promoters of the "Thirty
Dollars Every Thursday" California Pension Plan
are collecting $2,400 per day in small contribu
tions from o.'d people, and others eager to help
assure the passage of the '"easy money" proposal.
The leader in this pension promoting racket,
according to Walter Javenport, who investigated
for Collier's, is Willis Allen, who was convicted in
1934 for using the mails to defraud, by promoting
a fake hair restorer.
Two hundred thousand Californians are report
ed to have joined the movement, which is sponsor
ing a constitutional amendment to effcct the pay
ment by the state of S30 a week in scrip to all
unemployed citizens ovei fifty, and the member
ship is said to be increasing at the rate of 2,000
a day. Dues arc a cent a day, payable at the rate
cf 30 cents each month in advance. In addition,
Davenport states, Allen has sold 200,000 copies of
the movement's bible, "Ham and Eggs for Cali
fornia's" at 25 cents each, and 50,000 tiny Lib
erty Bells, insignia of the organization, at the
same price.
In an effort to forestall any possibility that the
pension amendment, if adopted, might be termed
unconstitutional, the promoters have inserted in it
a ciause stauu^ „
mandate or other legal or equitable process shall
ever issue to interfere with the administration of
this article or to prevent or enjoin any provision
of this article going into effect." They then added
a clause stating that "if any section, subsection,
sentence, clause or phrase of this constitution of
the State of California is in conflict with any of
the provisions of this article, such section, sub
section, sentence, clause or phrase is to the extent
of such conflict hereby repealed."
In case this were not enough, the promoters <>f
the plan concluded the proposed amendment with
the statement that "in the event that any decision
or order of any court shall hold invalid or uncon
stitutional any provision, section, subsection, sen
tence, clause or phrase of this article, or th® ap
plication thereof to any person or circumstance,
such decision or order shall not affect the validity
of the remaining portions of this article."
Thousands of persons who are not themselves
eligible for the pension but *ho have dependents
who are, plan to vote for the amendment on the
theory that "it may be a racket and maybe it won't
work for more than a couple of weeks, but that
will be sixty dollars more than I ever got before
for one vote," according to Davenport. He esti
mates that if the amendment is adopted 500,4)00
persons will sign up for $30 every Thursday, which
in one year would result in the issuance of $780,
000,000 in scrip.—Hickory Record.
WHAT ARE THE FACTS AS TO SPENDING?
Just at the moment when the Administration is
talking of expending nine billions of dollars next
year in an all-inclusive drive to hit the recession
or the depression a fatal blow at the base of the
brain, it is well to recount and to consider some
facts in connection with taxes and public spending
that obtain now or which have obtained. j
Such facts are assembled and announced by the
United States Chamber of Commerce in a manner
that gives one an instant and comprehensive grasp
of a situation which is impressive if not even ap
palling.
Among the fycts listed, most of which are taken
from official sources, are the following:
The cost of government—federal, state and local
—mounted from $8,918,000,000 in 1923 to $16,
900,000,000 in 1937, or from $79.96 per capita to
$130.75.
At the present rate of public spending it would
take the working population of a city of 150,000
inhabitants about 150 years to support the federal
government alone for one year.
In the last fiscal year the federal government
spent more than $21,000,000 a day.
The per capita cost of federal government in
creased from $27.95 in 1923 to $62.91 in 1937.
Governments of all types collected in taxes $7,
234,000,000 in 1923. In J 937 they collected $12,
300,000,000.
If every dollar of income »f persons receiving
more than $6,000 a year were to he taken in taxes,
the sum would pay the cost of our numerous gov
ernments for only about six months.
It would take about 42 cents of every dollar
spent in retail purchases in the United States last,
year to pay the cost of all governments.
Many business concerns pay more to government
in taxes than they pay to stockholders in dividends.
Some pay more to the tax collector than they pay
to employes.
During the 10-year period 1926-1935 all active
corporations paid in taxes three-fifths of their total
net income before taxes.
In 19b7 taxes absorbed 17.6 per cent of the
national income. If taxes had been levied to cover
| all government expenditures, thev would have
, taken more than 24 per cent of the national in
! come.
Government in recent years has spent much more
than it has collected. Iri^thc eight years 1931-1938
j the federal government alone spent $23,777,000,
000 more tl an it received.—Charlotte Observer.
I
BAD OMEN
The following editorial is from The Gastonia
Gazette:
"Senator Reynolds is quoted as saying that he
knows of a large number of farmers who are leav
ing the farms and going to the cities for the ex
press purpose of getting on relief, because they
can no longer make a living on the farm. -
"This sounds bad. It snows that the administra
tion farm policy is not working. Furthermore, 1
shows a bad tendency on the part of the peop e o
the country to depend on the government 01 i
living. We are developing a generation o eggar
and mendicants. Thoy think the goveinmen owe
them a living and they are determined > i
Uncle Sam feed them. , „
"If the government is going into the fanning
business, it ought to go at it light an m c 1
worth while for the farmer to co-op«ra e. n<> ,
let him hoe his own row as he ha ecn c oing ak
fore." «
The Vatican at Rome contains 11,000 room*
and is the world's largest palace.
China sends more students to American universi
' ties than does anj other couutry.
rf - \
blow ro
CARfc 0<J1
/W
eMfvae
piMS I
Adolf Whittler
LIFE DAY BY DAY
By WICKES WAMBOLDT
It is a good sign that .such a
large part of the civilized world
j is shocked, humiliated, angered by
England's capitulation to the de
* - # xi
Wamboldt
Ill <1 II II •"> VI ill*.
German dictator
as regards Nthe
.seizure by Ger
many of I. h h t
portion of Czech- f
oSlovakia known
as German Sude
tenland.
A hundred
years ago t h c
world wouldn't
have flickered an
eyelash over thfj
invasion of a |
small,
republic.
An increased
sense of respon
sibility is always accompanied r>y
a sense of shame and resentment
when that responsibility is shirk
ed; and as the sense of shame and
resentment grows stronger, the
determination to discharge the re
sponsibility grows stronger.
It is by going through one trial
after another, one humiliation af
ter another, that we human be
, iups grow to be men and women.
A few more Hitlers and a few
more Czechoslovakia?, a few more
Mussolinis and a few more Ethi
opian, a few more Japans and a
few more Chinas and we shall at
tain a degree of development
(perhaps) where the weakest na
I ticyi will bo as safe as the strong
est.
BORING FROM WITHIN
Considerable resentment was
felt, in the United States when Po
land after the World war began
driving out the Germans; and j
when Hungary nbout t ho same i
time began compelling the Ger
mans in that country to amalga
mate with that nation by adopt
ing the Hungarian language and
customs.
Kut Czechoslovakia in a spirit
of generosity allowed the Ger
mans in Sudetenland to have pro
portionnte representation in the
Czech parliament and to have
their own language and schools,
thus preserving and fostering
their rational identity. Subse
quent events have proved that th<>
Czechs were not so wise in deal
big w'itH" their German minority j
;cs were Poland and Hungary.,
Eeif-protiection nuty require a
people to adopt what seems at the
time to be harsh measures
"Either become a part of us
nn<i cooperate with us or depart
from amor.g us," is not an alto
gether unreasonable attitude for
a government to adopt, toward its
aliens.
The United States would do
well to keep a watchful eye 011
nationals who would destroy our
form of government.
MAN. 71, EATS 120 OYSTERS
SYDNEY, N. S. W. <UI')~T.
VV. Kattigan, 71, ate 10 dozen
oysters at one sitting at a lunch-1
eon held in connection with the
eleventh annual Oyster Growers'
conference here. His performance
is acclaimed as the best weight
for-age feat seen at the confer
ence for many years.
Guatemala is exporting nearly
1,000,000 bunches of bananas
monthly.
BEHIND THE SCENES
IN WASHINGTON
RODNEY DUTCHTR
BY RODNEY PUTCHKR
*EA Service Start Correspond*"! !
wsirs°cT~*nrr|
peace hasn't brought it a bit
! nearer. .. . i
There just isn't any peacc in,
i sight or even in the w>nd
! The chief reason is that no one:
can devise a formula by which the
' two groups can reunite without
giving one or the other an upper
hand. A. F. of L. leaders would
1 have every reason to expect an(
end to their control if they took!
C. I. 0.'-« millions in on an equal i
voting footing. C. I. O. leaders are
sure many of their unions would
' be raided and carved up if they
joined A. F. of L. on any other
| basis.
John L. Lewis stands on the as
sertion that C. I. O. would move
into the A. F. of L. "tomorrow"
if each C. I. O. unit were prom
ised a charter similar to those of
other A F. of L. unions, with the
further provision that jurisdic
tional disputes be settled by the
unions involved. .
Unlikelihood of an early merger
doesn't mean there's no chance of
a cessation of name-calling and
warfare between the two groups,
as suggested by Mr. Roosevelt.
But evente at the A. F. of L. con
vention indicate there's no imme
diate prospect of that.
Labor's chicf victory in recent
months has been the success of
Sidney Hillman, widely known as
"labor's statesman" long before
C. I. O. days, and Philip Murray
in reconciling the battling factions
of the United Automobile Work
ers. That struggle threatened to
damage C. I. O. even more than
it has been hurt by the depression
and might easily have gummed up
the C. I. O. convention scheduled
I for Pittsburgh Nov. 14.
One important rxiuxtvct r< ,w
is elimination of both Lovettcnc
Communists behind President Ho
mer Martin and .Stalin Commu
nists, who worked with the pro up
of suspended* officials now rein
stated, from the union's policy
making councils.
When C. I. O. Vice Chairmen
Hillmnn and Murray v/ent to De
troit few believed the break b^- (
tween Lewis and Martin over TT.
A. W. peace terms could be healed.
They were threatened with physi
cal violence and gunplay. Argu
ing with individuals one at a time
and supported by rank and file
union members interested in
union preservation rather than
leaders' squabbles, they finally
convinced a majority of Martin'.
board. Martin, isolated, gave over
control of the dispute to Murray
and Killman. Lately a united
board has been referring all prob
lems and disputes, willingly and
gratefully, to the two arbitrators
'Lewis and William Green ap
parently can't work out a peace
ful agreement like that because
there's no higher authority tc
whom they would be willing tc
refer differences. Roosevelt can't
do anything about it. Neither
Green nor Lewis has any presenl
intention of asking him to try.
* * *
*
f)NE wouldn't expect the United
^ Mine Workers to have much
trouble getting coal to heat their
big, handsomely renovated offices
here. But there are some prob
lems involved.
First they had to be careful
where the coal came from. It
must be union mined. Then the
question of a fair price came up.
Now the difficulty is in getting the
coal delivered by union teamsters.
Teamsters aren't organized in
Washington.
(Copyright 1938. NBA Service, Inc.)
Wait a Minute
By NOAH HOLLOWfc-LL. |
AS WEEKLIhS irimiv; ri3Q
(he privilege of .sitting in on the
monthly gabfest of the weekly
publishers of Western Carolina
Saturday night. They are always
planning, at least the more prog
ressive ones are, for greater serv
ice and wide interest for their
subscribers. Their latest trend
seems to be in the way of more
local pictures. A syndicated, gen
eral picture service is readily ob
tainable at reasonable cost but
the expense of local pictures from
engravings has been too great for
the average newspaper to indulge
in them to any great extent.
The trades have brought forth
small engraving plants that make
it. possible to make local pictures
in their own plants while hereto
fore such service had to be order
ed from other cities.
Some weekly papers are on their
toes and very progressive while
others are not much in the way of
improvement over the ox-cart age.
THE NEW THING: Looked in
on the Fletcher Grange last night.
This is something distinctly dif
ferent in the way of rural organi
zations. Fletcher, Mills River and
Etowah have had them for about
a year, meeting monthly for closer
acquaintanceship, fellowship and
business. These organizations
stand out in the front lines of
community thought and action
like the luncheon and other civic
organizations of the city and give
their communities means of ex
pressing themselves in matters of
eommurity-wide interest. They
hold out great possibilities for
their communities.
ACTIVE CHURCH LIFE: Mi»s
Margaret Bane, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Furman L. Bane of Cin
cinnati, formerly of Henderson
ville, ha*; been elected to the po
sition of assistant secretary of the
Ninth Street Baptist church, the
largest of this denomination in
the city. Her full-time duties will
consist of accompanist to the or
ganist and pianist and organist for
funerals, weddings, church organi
zations, etc. Miss Banc was visit
ing relatives in Ilendersonville
during the past summer.
MASTODON BONES
IN INDIANA PITS
TERRE HAUTE, Intl., Oct. 11.
(UP)—Gravel pits near here are
becoming a valuable source of im
portant geological information, ac
cording to Dr. Robert Karpinski,
Indiana State Teachers college
geologist.
He is directing excavation work
in the city gravel .pit where work
ers uncovered a hip jointof a pre
historic elephant. Dr. Karpinski
said the elephant may have been
a mastodon, hairy mammoth or a
Columbian elephant which trod
southern Indiana 20,000 to 50,000
years ago. He expects to make
positive identification when more
bones are uncovered.
Several months ago a group of
small boys discovered what Dr.
Karpinski identified as a masto
don tusk, measuring 12 feet in
length.
COSMETICS NECESSARY
WELLINGTON, New Zealand. I
(UP)—A woman must spend at
least $7.25 a year on cosmetius in
order to support herself in accord
ance with a civilized standard of
life. That opinion was expressed
during a wage dispute case in
volving clothing trade* workers.
U. S. RAISES FOURTH
OF WORLD'S ORANGES
BERKKI.KY, Cal.. Oh. II.—
(UP)—Out of a trial world pro
duction of 'JOO.OOO.oiui boxes of'
oranges annually, the United
States is now • producing slightly
more than one-fourth or this
amount, a survey of the orange
industry hy the Univeisity of Cal
ifornia reveals.
Oranges, ii is pointed out, are
produced on all live of the conti
nents hut because of climatic
requirements, their urowth is re
stricted to the tropical. semi
tropical and sul>-tropical coun
tries.
Approximately 07 per cent of
the more limn .~»0,()ii0.000 boxes
produced annually in the United
States are from t aiifornia and
Florida, the former producing 02
per ceni of the total ard the lat
ter 35 per cent. Texas, Arizona,
Louisiana, Alabama and Mississip
pi arc the t»iher orange producing
states.
In California, oranges are pro
duced <»r. approximately 10,000
farms, comprising 238,000 acres
of orange trees in more than 30
countries.
The survey said that consump
tion of oranges in the United
States has increased steadily with
the ri-c *n production. During the
decade following 1925 the con
sumption increased from 10 to 20
pounds per capita.
On the other hand, the con
sumption of other fresh fruits de
creased on a per capita basis. Ap
ples, especially, appear to be l«<s
injr gcouijd to oiiiu
said. *
METHODISTS i ro
ANNUAL C0S1T.REMJ
(Continue ! !'i<
.son.
Stewards wuiv t
'to 27 in number a
a ballot taken l>v lii
at the lust Sund: •
ice. The voting
in the followin;
which were confin
Mrs. Irma Allen. .
W. C. Armstn
B. H. Colt. A. T
Dixon, A. \. Kr
jlison, Mrs. S. M. ■
: Garren. L. fi. (>
I A. W. Groover.
A. I£. Johnson. '
I son. Roy K. Joht .
| W. H. Mellon. ( .
' Penny. Mrs. Th<>
I Shepherd, Marvi
i 1). Waddell. T. (
Other officers i! ,,
cording: stewsr
! district steward. '/
I ternate distri<
Geijrer; m: - •: > r
; Mrs. J. K. Ellis- . !
i liessie Jordan. /.. ( . "
I Horace I). Morri
: director, Mrs
I board of Christ i:
j S. M. Garren,
S. M. Garren.
A. 11. Johnson
superintendent
; school with the
partmental mip«* :•
: dren's, Hiss Mar.v
people's, Mrs. il iy
J. I'\ Stokes.
THIS CURIOUS V/ORLD
Ey \Vi!!;im
Fergucon
GORILLAS
haveh not vett
LIVED DOWN TT-S
TEKRJFVIN3
REPUTATION
% GIVEN THEM SV
FICTION WRITERS
C *{ ^ OF- P.^ST
'J* CENTURES/
^ SJCH TALES
X ALMOST
§ V^. CAUSED THE
f v* ANIMAL'S
' ^EXTINCTION,
v :•
GORILLAS
CO MOT ATTACK
UNLESS PROVOKED,
DO NOT WALK ERECT,
AND ARE BUT LITTLE
MORE ARBO?3EAL
THAN HUAAANS. \
core. 1938 by so - . s:
AN'SWEil" Yes. But their scales arc imbedded in t'.>
cannot ijc teen by the casual observer.
The sensational gorilla stories of Paul du Cliaillu. fi ' v.-hr. r.
to shoot a gorilla, did much to create an erroni.jus :
this animal. Edgar Allan Poe's "Murders in the ••'J- M ■'
increased thr public distrust of these apes.
SPEED CHAMPION
HORIZONTAL
1,5 Man whc l
made new
flying records
10 French
measure.
12 Dutch coin.
13 V-shaped
dent.
15 Carbon in
smoke.
16 Inlet.
17 Sun god.,
18 Limb.
20 For example. I
21 Opposite of in.
22 Musical note.
24 Senior.
25 He was once
an army flying
<pl.).
31 Box.
33 Wild cats.
34 Species of
pepper.
36 Brink.
37 Masses for the
dead.
39 Gun.
40 Bone.
41 Fruit pastry. k
42 To steal.
Answfr to Frcvious ruj7ir
nTeIsTt
C IE
A
m
I Al
LI A'N
Ubiojo
G U|Mp
U
jJfrjAiWlNflL
N'A
I plug]
vTnjMslfTElK
F I I
IM Am
m
UM
11 ViC
Mil IT
PlAtR A.
E|T
R
ElAjR!N1EJR j
□ R 0 U NiP
Ci'AlwlLlSr
ip v
[AJLJAI
In
44 Northeast.
45 Uniting tics.
47 Sacred song.
49 Icy rain.
51 Meadow.
53 To ascend.
55 Grain.
56 Large-lcalcd
plant.
58 Indian.
59 He first won
renown for a
cross
continent —
flight.
60 He was an
expert
pilot (pi.).
VERTICAL
1 Note in scale..
2 Pertaining to
rune?.
3 Small, wild ox.
4 Mesh of lace.
6 Stir.
7 Warm fabric.
8 Flying toys.
9 Street.
11 Jabbered.
14 The shank.
15 Fodder vet.
J I, /ll. -
country f°r
thv —
] () JI,A v ; one 8
Arrcric :'t
fivers.
?! hint Ic thint
23 K>.- h's boat
20 Dist nciivc
theory.
26 Elack brtii
27 Liquid •
measure.
28 Pussy.
29 Ru
emperors.
30 To sink.
32 Slot!:*
35 Mover's
truck.
37 F-ir.t co!«r.
J8 Karl ■ rr'3,>
f! Bjrd"'. ,d4
jo Art1'!"' I**'
isLccur"
iS To strir^
}7 Twinge.
jp, Du*nb.
50CJrd P3rr°*
32JJ.vf an ^
54 Neither.
jfiCorr.pnny
:•? Dye. _
■f," !- !/ I

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