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The times-news. [volume] (Hendersonville, N.C.) 1927-current, October 31, 1938, Image 4

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VOLS HEADING
GRID PARADE
fi SOUTHEAST
Vaudy Only Obstacle Be
tween Them and Per
fect Season
,. (>,. rr v.~ i ,..
By GENE PLOWDEN
United Prtss Staff Corses ^ond«*nt
ATLANTA* Ga., Oft. "1. (UP)
Jhe powerful Volunteers of Ten
hessee rode at the head of the
Southeastern football parade to
day with four victories and no de
feats and only two more confer
ence games to play.
Only one major obstacle—Van
derbilt—lies between Tennessee
and a perfect season. The other
conference foe is Kentucky, which
has not won a major ;anie this
season. Tennessee also has a game
with Chattanooga, but this should
be nothing more than a workout
for Major Hob Xey land's eleven.
In all. the Vols have scored
124 points to lt> for their six op
ponents. Tht-y have beaten Se
wanee. Clemson ami I..S.I*. have
crossed the \ ols' goal line.
Saturday Tennessee proved su
perior to the Tigers of L.S.U. by
scoring in the fin-: period and
adding another in tlu^third to l ing
up a 14-ti victory before 3>».000
spectators.
Second to Tennessee is Vamler
bilt. with three wins and one
loss. At the same time Vanderbilt
bowled over Georgia Tech. 13-7.1
at Nashville in ;i game that saw
the Commodores take a lead in
the second period, increase it in
the third, and ride to victory be
hind two brilliant little backs —
Bert Marshall and Junius Plun-,
kett-—who passed and ran their
way to glory before IS.ooo per
sons.
Aiaoama, k«i""»k —
after a 13-0 setback at the hands
of Tennessee, whipped Kentucky
at Lexington, 26-6. The Crimson
Tide led off with 14 points, saw
the Wildcats score six in the sec
ond period, then added two more
touchdowns in the last two quar
ters for a convincing victory.
Tulane, whose record had l>ei'*k
blurred only by a 13-10 loss to
Clemson and a scoreless tie with
Auburn, turned on the pressure
against Mississippi State and won
handily. 27-0.
Florida invaded Boston for a
^ame with Boston college and
was snowed under, 33-0. The Ga
tors held the Bostons at bay for
two periods, weakened and allow
ed a touchdown in the third, then
collapsed in the final quarter i
when Boston scored four times.
Out in Houston. Tex.. Auburn's ,
Plainsmen fell before the rejuve-l
nated Rice Owls. 14-0. Rice scor
ed in the second and fourth pe
riods to give Auburn its second
defeat in as many weeks.
Sewanee played rings around
Tennessee Polytechnic and made
13 first downs to three, but lost
the game, 7-6. Tech scored first
bn a 37-vard pass and added the
extra point that proved the mar
gin of victory.
Georgia's Bulldogs had an open
date.
This week's program features
four games. Alabama entertains
Tulane at Birmingham, Kentucky
m^ets Georgia Tech in Atlanta,
Mississippi State tangles with L.
S. U. at Baton Aouge. and Geor
gia plays Florida in Jacksonville.
• STORIES
IN STAMPS

Madagascar—aip'Island
As Big as Texos --
ARCO POLO heard of Mada
gascar off the east African
coast, in the Indian ocean, and he
wrote a chapter about it in his
famous book.' The explorer con
fused it with the mainland but at
that he had hit upon one of the
largest islands in the world.
New Guinea and Borneo are
larger, but Madagascar, with an
"estimated 241,000 square miles of
aifcfe, is nearly as big as the state
of Texas. It is 980 miles long,
satf- 360 miles wide at its greatest
breadth. In addition, attached to
it for government, is the prosper
ous ' archipelago of the Comoro
Islands with an area of about 838
*$trare miles.
upwards ot 4,000,000 people in
habit this huge island, which is
separated from the African coast
by the Morarabique channel, 240
miles wide at its narrowest part.
Their chief employment is agricul
tural They grow rice, manioc,
beans, vanilla corn, coffee, cloves,
tbbacco, sugar car>e,' and cocoa
The forests are nXh in tanning
wood, raffia, resins, gam, and bees
wax. There is some mrniiig of
graphite, gold and radium. The
Malagasy are skillful in metal
working.
Slow to develop their natural
resources have been the natives
of MWbgascar, but they have
$hown - ingenuity. They are ex
■p^foHMKlultivation: of rice and
rtiaijtoc,. fea cattle raising. They
ttrer toe artists In Various forms
Weaving. •* But direction of
die "ial^id's econonrtfc resources
>« vested largely in the French,
who took over
tfie arrea as' a
protectorate in
1885. The cap
ital is Anta
nanarivo, with
a population
of nearly 100;
000. A cur
rent Madagas
car air stamp,
showing a map
of the great
island, is re
□roduced here
ACwrl***- N*A S«vic«.
• * > ij
Dies bays He'll Never bay Die
Gesturing with his cigar, Representative Martin Dies declares his
intention to go on with the hearings of his committee on Un-Ameri
can Activities. In a formal statement Dies denied the presidential
accusation that his committee was playing politics and making no
effort to get the real truth of the Michigan situation. Witnesses
testifying in VV:ishingon had accused Gov. Frank Murphy of
"treachery" in his handling of the auto sitdown strikes.
Auburn goes north to play Villa
nova at Philadelphia, Ole Miss
plays at St. Louis, Vanderbilt
meets Sewanee and Tennessee en
terta i ns C'hattanooga.
Sheriff's Firing"
Squad Executes
Man For Murder
SALT LAKE CITY. Oct. 31.—
(UP)—John W. Deer ins: was ex
ecuted today by a sheriff's firing
squad for the murder on May 9 of
Oliver Meredith. Jr., proprietor of
a leather goods store.
He was executed under the
Utah law. giving a condemned man
the choice of the manner of death.
I He allowed instruments to be
strapped to his wrist to record his
, heart action immediately before
and after his death in a last-min
ute wish to advance the cause of
science.
MOSLEMS PROTEST
U. S. ATTITUDE ON
HOLY LAND STRIFE
CAIRO. Oct. 31. (UP)—A dele
gation of the local (Moslem) Pal
estine committee vited the United
States legation Sunday and pro
tested against the attitude of the
United States egarding the Jew
ish-Arab troubles in the Holy
Land. The U. S. charge d'affaires
promised to transmit the com
plaint to Washington.
231 HORSES DIE
LITTLE HOCK, Ark.. Oct. 31.
(UP)—A wave of sleeping sick
ness which spread to 3H Arkansas
counties had resulted in deaths of
231 horses and mules. Dr. D. C.
Stubbs. state veterinarian, report
• ed last night.
COL. FRANCO,
SPANISH AIR
ACE KILLED
Was First to Fly South At
lantic; Plane Fell
in Storm
Bi nGOS. Spain, Oct. 31. (IT).
Colonel Ramon Franco, 42-year
old brother of Generalissimo Fran
cisco Franco of the Spanish na
tionalists and the first man to fly
the South Atlantic, was killed
when his military hydroplane
crashed in a storm off the Island
of Majorca, nationalist headquar
tesr announced yesterday.
The accident apparently hap
pened Friday. Franco's plane and
another took off from Majorca's
seaplane base just after dawn.
The other plane returned soon be
cause of bad weather and war
1 ships began a patrol in hope of
^rescuing Franco.
A stopped watch on the body
of one of Franco's companions in
dicated the plane crashed at (5:05
a. m. Friday, shortly after it left
its base.
The body of the trouble-loving
aviator, who was the first to fly
the South Atlantic and nearly
died on an attempted flight from
Spain to New York in July, 192f>, j
was found floating near the
wreckage of his his plane off the
i Island of Majorca in the Balearics.
Four others aboard the seaplane
piloted by Franco lost their lives
in the crash. They were Captain
Melchor Sangro, Lieutenant Dom
inguez, a radio operator and a i
mechanic. The bodies of all ex
cept the radio operator were re
covered and taken to Palma, Ma
jorca.
South Only Nine Inches Away
From Prosperity—Mr. Smith
By NEA Service
GREENVILLE, Miss.. Oct. 31.
Comes now one C. S. (Shirt-tail)
Smith with a double-barreled pro
posal to solve the South's cotton
surplus problem and bi ing com
fort and protection to suffering
males by adding inches to shirt
tails.
Eager and anxious to spread
his gospel, Mr. Smith posed for
the picture at right with a yard
stick strapped to his back to prove 1
his shirttail is only 2D inches long
or 9 inches less than what he
claims is standard—38 inches.
A nation-wide acceptance of his
plan for adding inches to all shirts j
would brinjr health and prosperity
to the South by increasing cotton
consumption, and a new joy in «
living for all men, argues Smith.
Mr. Smith sets forth that he is
5 feet, 11 inches tall and wears a
15 H shirt with a 34 sleeve, and
bv rights should get a 38-inch
shirt-tail with every shirt he buys. ,
>Says Mr. Smith:
"The manufacturer, not being «
under restrictions, has cheated the
cotton surplus out of 9 inches of
cloth. Add this shortage to the
hundreds of millions of shirt-tails
—a id there's the remedy. Simple
and inexpensive. The picture tells
the tale.
"The theory I've been fighting
for is at least a partial cuve for
our great economic ills. Yet it is
so simple, and the remedy'so eas
ily applied, it is almost unbeliev
able. While the world has ac
knowledged my theory, and two
countries have taken action on it,
my own country is slow to apply
the remedv because it is .iust too
, simple, too inexpensive. We look
for costly, complicated, distaste
ful remedies."
BONNET! SEEKS
Activities First Under Ab
rupt Reversal of
French Policy
PARIS, Oct 31. (UP)—For
eign Minister fcleorge Bonnet to
day opened a series of conversa
tions regarded as a prelude to the
four-power 'negotiations for a
general European 'appeasement.
Bonnet received a first report
from Andre Francois Poneet, \vh<>
has been transferred from, the
Berlin embassy to ttomc on his
last conversations with Fuehrer
Adolf Hitler ami hi, li German of
ficials.
Reports had been circulated in
diplomatic quarters that Poncet
returned from Berlin with subven
tions for a non<iggression treaty
at Munich by Hitler and Prime
Minister Neville Chamberlain o{
Great Britain.
Premier Daladier, armed with
quasi-dictatorial powers ■ l»y his
own Radical-Socialist party con
gi ess, yesterday returned to Par
is and embarked on a program of
friendship with the dictatorship*
in an abrupt reversal of French
foreign policy.
Many diplomats believed that
as result of the rousing approval
of his program in the party con
gress at Marseilles, Daladier will
seek to les'.'l off with a Franco
German non-aggression pact. •
The Marseilles congress court
ed Nazi friendship and opened
the way for such a pact when it
read the Communists out of tho
government majority and veered
away from the Franco-Soviet mil
itary alliance and toward the
right.
It was understood that a non
agression agreement with Chan
cellor Adolf Hitler, in the form
of a gentlemen's agreement simi
lar to that which l>er Fuehrer and
British Prinfe Minister Neville
Chamberlain signed at Munich a
month ago,' was looked upon as
affording the foundation for a
more detailed program of Franco
German appeasement.
Immaculata Has
Hallowe'enFete
Immaculata School held its '-an
nual Hallowe'en party on Friday
evening. Oct. 28, in the parish
hall.
The hall was very attractively
decorated with Hallowe'en ftP
toons, witches, skeletons, blaok
cats, and pumpkins. Every avail
able space was used for the Very
beautiful small branches and
leaves brought by the parents otf
the children. Huge pumpkins were
also donated by the parents for
decorations.
Each child was costumed and
these effects ranged from pirates
and devils to colonial dame? and
queens. ' -u
Many games were played and
many prizes distributed. .Barbara
Beall won the prize for the best
costume.
The guest, of honor was the
Rev. Father Philip O'AIara, pastor
of the Immaculata Conception
chyrch. ■ <. « , ; V v.
■i • * . . .. , t .
Drunk, Disorderly
.. V a k. ■ m w
Cases Are Called
, ' I
Abf <r§ses w^jije hear^'
in city court this morning before
Mayor A. V. Edwards. The docket
was as follownt • -<
Bob Smith, drunk and disorder
ly. was fined $10. and cbsts. i
Frank Stepp, drunk and disor
derly, was fined $25 and! costs.
Elgin Hyder, drunk ami disor
derly, forfeited a cash bond.
$ueenie Green, drunk and dis
orderly, was assessed costs.
H L. Rowland, drunk and dis
orderly, forfeited a cash .- bond.
Charlie McMahan, drunk and dis
orderly, was'fined $10 and costs.'
Perry * Bragg, alias • Arthur
Storter, dvunk and disorderly, for
feited a cash bond.
CHOIR NOTES SOUR,
RECTOR WOULD QUIT
iT v- H:!
' SAVANNAH, Ga.. Ckt. 31.—
(Ur)—iTnb chofr:'of %l. Jbhn's
Episcopal church is composed of
boys. Members of the church ad
mit that some of the boys sonic
times fling qff key. The pastor of
the church. :the Rey. 'Ernest Ris
ley, yestewlay told his congrega
tion that the off-key; notes so irri
tated him that he was resigning;.
He last nigfyt studied a plea of the
congregation that he reconsider
his resignation while -the sour
notes of the choir were eliminated..
|ilR|jpFSi
I
% \ X
1 ^DS ARE NEWS
PriiUedln Tape
a . ■
P *" w . , *
SAMPLE BALLOT i
Official Ballot on Constitutional <
Amendroients "
ljisTttucrffllrs
1. To vote "Yes" on any question, make a cross (X) mark in the I
square to the right of the word "Yes."
2. To vote "No" on any question, make a cross (X) mark in the
square to the right of the word "No."
3 If vou tear or deface or wrongly mark this ballot, return it and
3. If you
get another.
I
fr
yES For Amendment Making Term of Office of Sher
iff and Coroner Four Years.
• .. «, . , t 9r *' Pi"
NO , | Against Amendment Making Term of Office of
Sheriff and Coroner Four Years.
* * L ' " # r- . 1 *• i ' ' (■
^ ^
*2'o'-j u,!
YES i i For a Department Jpf Justice.
NO Against a Department of Justice.
—1 "\,| * '• ; •« fu.qi tci I
Election November 8, 1938. (.4;i f^
< "* • • • W. A. LUCAS,
Chairman f State Board of Elections.
SAMPLE BALLOT
Official Henderson County Ballot
1. To vote a straight ticket niakl^a kTosir\?() mark ifi t^JAllele of
Ihe party you desii'e to vote for. -
2. To vote for some but not all the candidates of one party, make a
cross (X) mark in the square at the left of the name of 'every
candidate printed on the ballot for whom you wish to vote. If you
mark ahy one candidate you must mark, all for whom you \ffeh to
vote. A mark in the circle will not be counted if any one candi
date is marked. . m ' n • « i
3. If you tear or deface or wrongly mark this ballot, return it and
onnthw .) . tj ft • t.*. 'r'-" t.'ii
DEMOCRATIC
TO VOTE STRAIGHT TICKET
mark (X) Within circle
FOR SOLICITOR
Eighteenth Judicial District
□ CLARENCE O. RIDINGS
FOR STATE SENATOR
Twenty-Seventh Senatorial Dist.
(Vote for Two)
r-| RALPH W. GARDNER
p| L. B. PRINCE
FOR REPRESENTATIVE
n L.'l. BURGIN '
FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER
)• • * (Vote for Three) "
P| T. L. DURHAM
fi'J.' A. RUSHER
P) D. G. WILKIE
FOR SHERIFF
QW.
E. DAVIS 1
FOR CLERK SUPERIOR COURT
Q GEORGE W. FLETCHER
FOR TAX COLLECTOR
HJ J. M. STEWART
FOR CORONER
P] J. F. RROOKS
FOR SURVEYOR
Q CHAS. B. tURNER
FOR COUNTY BOARD OF
EDUCATION
□ J. W. MORGAN
| REPUBILCAN
:)0~CA\
TO VOTE STRAIGHT TICKET
MARK '(X) WlfHlN CIRCLE
y t t t~* ,J
i*' FOR SOLICITOR
Eighteenth Judical District
H 'GARRETT D. BAIlEY
i—J jV !
' FOR STATE SENATOR
_ p ' * 'i' • w ' ■' i r\
Twenty-Seventh Senatorial Dist.
(Vote for Two)
[j MACK SAUNDERS
a ------------- - -
FOR REPRESENTATIVE
r] BKOWNLOW JACKSON
FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER
(Vote for Three)
J-J BURT J. SITTON
L. L. MERCHANT
[~1 EARL T. BROWN
FOR SHERIFF
JOHN W. DRAKE J
FOR CLERK SUPERIOR COURT•
M. N. ORR • •
FOR TAX COLLECTOR
R. HILLIARD STATON
FOR CORONER i
j~~| BENJAMIN F. CLIFF
„ J J !;
FOR SURVEYOR
•—j J. B. PATTERSON'
FOR COUNTY BOARD OF
EDUCATION ' 1
General Election, November 8, 1938.
L. T. DERMID,
Chairman. Henderson County Board of Elections.
CCC YOUTH CAN'T
> BUILD FIRE FQjR SELF
i ■ »• . *•
SEASIDE, - Ore. t( UP) .—Fred
Ladieu, CCC worker, »-m«y- have
had a j<ood CCC training, but he
was sadly lacking in that of a Boy
I Scout.
While wandering about the hills,
Ladieu fell, struck his head on a
.rock, and was knocked unconsci
ous. He came to in the midfct of
a drenching; rain, but found a cave
in whidh to take'refuge.
Later he shot a deer, but havin#
no matches and knowing nothing
of the fire starting methods of
Bo>v Scouts, he lived off raw veni
son for two days until searching
parties found him.
EXPERT CLIMBER KILLED
UVALDE, Tex., Oct. 31. (UP)
Walter L. Price, for many ytars
a telephone lineman and consid
ered expert at climbing the tall
smooth poles, fell from a small
pecan tree at his father's farm j
and was killed today.
MAN'S DIARY SERVES
AS TOWN LIBRARY
»-j : f ■ 1 **<)•• i
ROBINSON, HI., Oct. 31. (UP). |
Residents of Robinson who want
information on daily weafrher con-,
dftions, politics or catastrophes i
during the pasfc 55 years don't
heed a library. 4
1 They just ask Sam J. Barnck.
If he doesn't remember offhand
he can find the answer in his
diary.
"Since February 26, 1883, Bar-:
rick has kept a diary which in
cludes ,in addition to personal af
fairs, references to events of pub
lic interest or importance.
Raincoats of oil silk with matt;
surface have appeared in London. '
V/P
BY MRS. GAYNOR MADDUX
NKA Service Staff Writer '
AS you stand in the kitchen on
Columbus Day, the 12thf of
Dctober, think of the historical
voyage of Columbus and the re
mits. Perhaps we might in all
seriousness call Italian-American
:ooking one of the best results.
My personal experience, after
sating Italian food in Jtaly,.and
then in' San Francisco ahd New
York, convinces me Italian food
tastes even better on <he conti
nent Columbus discovered, s
Italian recipes are a dangerous
j subject. There seem to be many,
i many "one and only" ways to
; cook, native dishes. Therefore I
gMv not assume responsibility.
Filed Chicken, Kalian Style
(Serves 4) ' <
I 'One young spring' chicken joint
erf, 1 f-4 feup ftoUrJ^S tablespoons
lemon juice; IA cap olive oil,
1-2- teaspoon salt, rMj. teaspoon
^pepper, 1 bay >af, grate# Parme
san^ cheese, 4 tablespoon* butter.
• Flour pieces of chicken.Jightly.
M* Jemon m^de, oliv« oil, 1 salt,
peppec. and jbay-4$al.xBeat fhor
ougftly arid, .pour Oye>. chicken.
3** j^hour. then
R^l chieksn
jPrif ■ ??**■.; fry- in
'Inw : tvv'Xity.v.ii' 5to.. j
■ 11
Columbus Day Menu
BREAKFAST: Honeydew*
mejori, dry cereal, broiled kid- ,
neys, "buttered tbast, cr£ttber- '
ry and \ apple Jelly, coffee, J j,
milW. V...*. .V. v.t 1
-LUNCHEON: Baked lima
beans >vitft onions, crisp rolls,1
cubed pineapple' and1 orange,
cookies, tea, milk. '^4-y i i
COLUMBUS DAY DINNER;* j
Minestrone soiip, spring chick
feh.jtajian style, buttered spa- j j
g"het\i,r'^'Florentine r'Spintsh, ,
, *reer\ sala£:£*sh , peats- and !
-.cheese; c^nfe^.tnillq. " - ^ .
i-ii-i: r "iv •—i i ■ . j
.4T;.e. j—law, _ U-ATa 7"UL»]
fFlorentine Spinach
_i§eiifis_4 to. 6} i j
Four tablespoons butter melted,
4 tableSp^tt# ,ftout?-,V»cy»4 cup?
milk, 3 eggs, 3 4cap& Cooked and i.
chopped spinach, sa|t pepper |r
Blend the floiflr*ftfitH*1fte1n#ttec
butter and; slowly ;ad<r the milk
stirring constantly. Season with |
salt and pepper. Beat the egg{
lightly an<J add Yo^the white
sauce, then add the spinach.■,*»
l'Pour alt mtb a butteretf-mold |
cover and bake in a pari of hoi
water in a moderate oven (35f j1
decrees F/) abour l'^our;— •' *
V .O- . :.i , •.
FORMER POLK
WcFarland Succumbs to In
juries Recently ^uffer-"
ed on Highway
TRYOX, Oct. 31.—Former Sher
iff Robert F. McFarland, 54, of
Polk county, died in the hospital
hero on Sunday morning: as a re
sult of injuries suffered several
days af?o when thrown from a
truck near Colunlbus.
Funeral services will be held at
2 o'clock this afternoon at the
Columbus Baptist church with the
Rev. c. M. McGeachey officiating.
Burial will follow in the Presby
terian church cemetery.
Mr. McFarland served as sheriff
of Polk county from 1925 to 1028.
He was injured several days ajro
when the truck in which he Nvas
lidinK with several
a rock rod?i' and thv..w hrmV^1
ground. ' 1
He i* survived by hk . I
five children. J„hn MeFari*'i
Detroit; Robert McF*^!
loihbu*; Mrs. Joe White \t i
vifle; Miss Mary ElizabcftuSl
lknd. Columbus and
Farland. of Columbus: h %
ers. J- S. and Ualph
and two sisU'i>. M>>. .1. f Vl
„f Rutherford i-cdl.-;.*,
J. H. Hill. <'f Spindalc '1
CLYDE LIVE-STOCK
| PRICES ARE Quqtj
I J» vi('w- Pf th«
'beifijr held in Hondor^?4
; following: price* iff,.,, "1'*-;
| Clyde market.
! of Jntor»st l„
today: Cows. r,o , ti
i $5.50 to $H; t alv<-> ' :
'tis, S5.;,0 - 7 .ii
I to $7.50. The sal* 1
mm ket last w.T!; • f'
the amount involve «
S AMPLE BALLOT r
Official Ballot for State Officer
U, S. Senator and Congressman
_ INSTRUCTIONS-' " ~ ^
-»• V ' '*1 r" V ' "
1- To vote a straight ticket ma"ke a cross (X) mar^ jn ,
the party you desire to vote for. i (lrdf
2. To vote for some but not all the candidates of unt.
ci'o.-s (X) mark in the square at the left of ;h,. narr>
candidate printed on the ballot for whom you wish to vm u{
maik any .one candidate you must mark all for whom vd
vote. A mark in the circle will not bo counted if -
date is marked. • 1 • "n' oi
If you tear or deface or wrongly mark thi> ballot, r,,tu,
jret another. . a 111
DEMOCRATIC
o
FOR A STRAIGHT TICKET
MARK WITHIN THIS CIRCLE
STATE OFFICERS'
• ; . 4 ; • , k •
For Associate Justice of
Supreme Coxift
r] M. V. BARNHILL

For A»»ociate Justice of
•i Supreme Court
j~~] J. WALLACE WINBORNE
For Associate Justice of
Supreme Court
f—| A. A. F. SEA WELL
□ -------

For Attorney General
HARRY McMULLAN
□ —
For Commissioner of Labor
f-| FORREST H. SHUFORD
For Utilities Commissioner
r] STANLEY WINBORNE
□ --
For Judge Superior Court
1st District
C. EVERETT THOMPSON
For Judge Superior Court
• '2nd District
\~] WALTER J. RONE
For Judge Superior Court
5th District
□ J. PAUL PRIZZELLE
For Judge Superior Court
6th District
j~~] HENRY L. STEVENS, JR.
□ —til'
For Judge Superior Court
8th District
H JOHN J. BURNEY

For Judge Superior Court
9th District
□ Q. K. NIMOCKS, JR.
□ ...
For Judge Superior Court
• • • lOth District
□ LEO CARR

For Judge Superior Court
_ : 12th District
PI H. HOYLE SINK

For Judge Superior Court
14th District
[~~] WILLIAM H. BOBBITT
D d&iu l.
For Judge Superior Court
16th District
f~l WILSON WARLICK
I 1 rr*- -;->rvrfrcr
'■ *. I' ■ —-j * >■'.! 1 '■ !*
For Judge Superior Court
r 19th Diftriet
[*~1 ZEB V. NETTLES
□'—' Saiiwr > «
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For Judge Superior Court
21st Dittrict
□ ALLEN H. GWYN
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For United States Senator
□ ROBERT R. REYNOLDS
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For United States Senator
Eleventh Congressional District
□ ZEBULON WEAVER . ,
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REPUBLICAN
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FOR A STRAIGHT TICK!'
MARK WITHIN THIS CHI
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' STATE OFFICERS
For Associate Justice »i
> 'Supreme Court
HERBERT F. SKAWtLL
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For Associate Justice of
Supreme Court
H] IRVIN B. TL'CKKR
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For Associate Justice el
' Supreme Court

For Attorney Genera!
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For Commissioner of
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For Utilities Commi»nw|
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For Judge Superior Cor|
1st District

For Judge Superior Cor
2nd District

For Judge Superior Ccir
5th District

For Judge Superior Con*
6th District

For Judge Superior Cm" |
-■ 8th District

' For Judge Superior C**
9th District

For Judge Superior C**
10th District
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For Judge Superior ^
12th District
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For Judge Superior W
14th District
For Judge Superior
16th District
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For Judge Superior Co«
19th District
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For Member of <>*
Pj'CHARLE? A. ">NA- .
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~ For JVIember of Co
Eleventh C°^{m?5kR
rn.vohJ&O L. Gl
Election November 8, 1938. \\\ A
. ■; m ___ Chairman of Statu l"1'1'
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