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The times-news. [volume] (Hendersonville, N.C.) 1927-current, December 20, 1938, Image 1

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WEATHER
Increasing cloudiness and slight
ly warmer tonight; Wednesday
„o»tly cloudy, posiihly scattered
ight rains and colder.
(Llir (Ltutrs
Largest Daily Circulation of Any Newspaper in North Carolina in Proportion to Population
GOOD AFTERNOON
t
By new Mr. Chamborlain musk
hav# roallcod ho was ^patachocT*
around pretty badly at Muuiek.
■OL 57—No. 303
HENDERSONVILLE, N. C., TUESDAY, DECEMBER 20, 1938
SINGLE COPIES, FIVE CENTS
E1CHS LEADER
'UZZLES OVER
OVIET POWER
bility to Resist Nazi In
cursions Is His Big
Problem Now
fOULD CREATE STATE
JIG AS TEXAS, KANSAS
(UNITED PRESS)
i;ta\>fuehrer Adolf Hitler to
i) Ltd cautiously toward a
i..: if the world's most per
ttur... post-war mystery — the
r :::: of the Soviet Union.
Tho Gorman fuehrer is break
t c'-nd for a test in the fer
» rie! is of the Ukraine, where
u:: v-.eouraged agitation was
irea.:.:i< for the creation of a
ration, to be called Greater
L'amc.
Po!a::d. Rumania. Czechoslova
& and Russia would lose sover
ity over an area as big as Kan
s arH Texas combined and with
pou.ation as large as France if
r a^tation is successful.
Meantime, in Budapest the Hun
:.ar. government denounced as
"rendencious lie" a statement of
e Slovak autonomous govern
or::.; Hungary frontier viola
Hb>. The- Hungarian charge
Hmd the increasing seriousness
^4e Har sarian-Slovak relations.
Lovak-hungary
kRLEY BREAKS OFF
BRATISLAVA. Czechoslovakia.
tc. 20. (CP)—The government
1 autonomous Slovakia province
5: ni^ht broke off frontier nego
lt: :is with Hungary after a post
ection e!a»h in which two Czech
Iftoras officials allegedly were
in in a fight with Hungarian ir
rulars.
It was understood that the Slo
i government had decided to
l-.al to Premier Benito Musso
iand Chancellor Adolf Hitler—
i- ir October satisfied Hungary's
r:.torial demands against the
:ccii> for protection against the
^tcarian terrorist acts.
: :ar: soldiers said the cus
■?.* nv.-:: resisted an attack by a
Br.jrarian detachment, which in
tied soi-jiers.
The cia>n occurred as returns
lor. Sunday's first elections for
* > i .a:, parliament showed
*'■ !-•; cent of all votes were
for the government party of
tar. Tiso. Onlv govern
I- ' : Slovak Union Party can
•-1' ••••:•• permitted on the bal
il
■" - e t.<wns near the Hunga
tier, however, the gov
ftau-nt Vote was only 30 per cent
^ - sentiment favoring
c •' >vith Hungary.

lotarians And
Kiwanians Will
Meet Thursday
H-nd?rsonville Rotariana will
*"old their meeting at the refc
■f time this week but will meet
P the K:\vnnis club Thursday.
*c*ers of the two clubs will ex
J?ifts. which later will be
jj^buted to underprivileged chil
The Kiwanis club will pre
tt: the program.
pANE BLOWS
DP-FOUR DIE
J°£RXE. Tex., Dec. 20. (UP)
. f,uf members of the United
•es armed services were killed
, night when a coast guard
exploded over this town
* crashed.
■ .* victims were Lieutenant F.
' y°na and Rupert Germaine of
euard: Ensisrn C. H.
of th«- navy, and George
^•rn- stated army man.
4 a. Tes SH'd *^e plane explod
*,tYl Passed over the town,
i to rtatnes, and then crash
m 4 Pasture.
BiRTH ANNOUNCED
^ and Mr*. Alvin Jackson
bounced the birth of a
er- Dixie Lee, at their
*• Ln°, on Saturday. Mn.
^Was formerly Miss Edna
SANTA CLAUS
WILL RETURN
ON THURSDAY
In an effort to secure informa
tion on desired gifts as early as
possible, Santa Clan*, will return
| to Hendersonville Thursday to
meet all boys and girl§ in Hender
sonville's trade area,'it was learn
ed today.
Officers of the merchants divi
sion of the chamber of commerce
said Santa had sent this word from
another North Carolina city, and
as an added inducement to all who
haven't let him know their gift
wishes he promised to have with
him a large quantity of candy to
be distributed Thursday when he
meets the children and asks them
what they want him to leave in
their stockings.
The veteran suint will spend
Friday elsewhere but will be here
for part of Saturday at least, and
will attend the Christmas tree cel
ebration at Church street and 5th
avenue Saturday night.
CHAMBERLAIN
FACES REVOLT
ON REARMING
Wins Confidence Vote on
Foreign Affairs But
New Crisis Looms
LONDON, Dcc. 20. (UP)—Po
litical quarters today reported
Prime Minister Chamberlain is
threatened with a cabinet revolt
in a dispute, not involving * the
government's foreign policy but
its rearmament program.
According to political gossip a
number of men of junior minis
terial rank remanded the resigna
tion of four key cabinet members
because the British rearmament
program was not speeded up in
the lull after the Czechoslovakian
crisis.
The Evening Standard report
ed that a "serious revolt" has
broken out within the cabinet be
cause of a continued lag in the
government's rearmament pro
gram.
The three under - secretaries
threatening to resign were identi
fied as A. U. M. Hudson of the
ministry of transport, Marquess
of Dufferin and Ava of the col
onial offiee and Lord Stratcona
and Mount Royal of the war of
fice.
They were said to have insist
ed that Waj Minister Leslie Hore
Belisha, Minister of Defense Co
ordinator Sir Thomas Inskip and
Earl Winterton, assistant to Home
Secretary Sir John Simon, be re
moved from the cabinet.
The criticism of the "rebels"
was said by the Evening Stand
ard to be directed chiefly against
Hore-Belisha, although they
charged that all three ministers
involved in home defense failed
, to take advantage of a "breath
ing space" afforded by the Mu
nich four-power pact to push na
tional rearmament to the limit.
CHAMBERLAIN SEES
POUCY AS RIGHT
! LONDON, Dec. 20.—(UP) —
Prime Minister Neville Chamber
lain last night won a strong vote
(Continued on page three)
| School Teachers'
Retirement Fund
| Act Considered
RALEIGH, Dee. 20.—Sponsor?
of a olan for retirement of public
school teachers and other state of
ficers, which proposal will be sub
mitted to the general assembly,
conferred yesterday with Gover
nor Hoey.
No definite plans were formu
lated, but it was the opinion o 1
the conference that all retiremenl
plans would be consolidated into s
single measure. Under tentative
, plans, employes would contribute
5 per cent of earnings, the state
would match this sum, and retire'
ment would come at age 65 aftei
, 35 years of service.
Governor Hoey did not oppose
the plan, but questioned sponsors
as to raising the funds to be con
tributed by the state. Retiremenl
of teachers under the plan woulc
cost the state $1,000,000 annual
1 ly, it was estipated.
Washington Bull-etin
I laSSSm
Flower-loving "Ferdinand the Bull" was bitten by the "presidential I
bee" and "Justice Hughes" gave the matter judicial thought as
wives of Gridiron Club members masqueraded at Mrs. Franklin |
D. Roosevelt's annual Washington party for "Gridiron Widows." |
MUSICA AS BRILLIANT AND
! AUTOCRATIC EXECUTIVE NOT
QUESTIONED BY HIS BOARQj
■ „
Chiang Turned Down His
Effort to Market Out
moded Rifles
NEW YORK, Dec. 20. (UP)—
Federal authorities today turned
up evidence that McKesson and
Robbim was involved in a deal
to sell two million outmoded army
rifles to the Chinese army but
was turned down by Generalise
simo Chiang Kaishek.
NEW YORK, Dec. 20. (UP)—
Philip Musica, as F. Donald Cos- I
| ter, president of McKesson and
Robbins, Inc., was described to
day as a brilliant and autocratic
executive whose decisions, even
when shrouded with secrecy, nev
er were questioned by other di
rectors and officers of the firm.
William J. Murray, Jr., Colum
bia, S. C., first vice-president and
director of McKesson and Rob
bins, testified at the hearing con
ducted by Assistant State Attor
ney General Ambrose V. McCall
1 that not until last November did
any other executive attempt to
obtain a breakdown of the crude
drug department which Musica
operated as a huge swindling pre
serve.
WONDER WHERE ALL
I THE MONEY WENT
By MARTIN KANE
United Pres» Staff Correspondent
NEW YORK, Dec. 20. (UP) —
The monstrous chicaneries of
Philip Musica, alias F. Donald
| Coster, last night were described
by independent investigators for
1 New York State and the federal
| government as involving gigantic
' bootlegging operations before and
) after prohibition and gun-running
J operations which may have been
' accomplished in violation of the
1 neutrality act.
, business, in which Coster at least
Magnitude of the gun-running
contemplted engaging, was shown
by the preliminary draft of a
contract by which the president
of McKesson and Robbins, old
and respected drug firm, was em
powered to obtain for shipment
| to a "British port" no less than
2,000,000 Lee-Enfield rifles.
Brien McMahon, ace govern
ment prosecutor who came to
| New York from Washington yes
terday to coordinate the investi
gation by seven government de
1 partments.t rated Coster's illici
liquor transactions as among the
j mightiest of the prohibition and
! early repeal eras.
| The preliminary contract, a
' a portion of which was released
• by the State Attorney General's
office, specified that the rifles and
1000,000,000 or more .30 calibre
cartridges were to be "removed
from arsenals to convenient ship
ping ports on the Atlantic sea
. j board, thence to be loaded and
: shipped to British ports to be
I designated."
: j The agreement had at least the
i appearance of legality, in that it
. j contained assurance that the Mc
; Kesson and Robbins official would
; "use your best efforts as herein
. after set forth to secure all nee
(Continued on page three)
Edneyville 1939
And '38 Squads
-Will Battle
, j
Boys' and Girls' Teams to
Clash in New Gym
nasium There
EDNEYVILLE, Dec. 20. (UP) j
(Special)—One of the high spots
of the current Henderson county;
basketball season will be the clash
between the team for Edneyville
high and the great aggregation
which made such an admirable
record over Western North Caro
lina for the school during the sea
son of last year.
All members of the 1938 team
graduated last spring, and it will
be a new squad which goes out
on the floor for EHS in the game
this Tuesday evening at 7:30
o'clock.
For their part of the twin bill
the girls' team will meet an con
gregation from Hendersonville
which js composed largely of EHS
graduates. The feature attraction
will take place in the new Edney
ville p-ymnasium.
Line-ups for the boys game are
as follows:
1938 SQUAD 1939 SQUAD
Ed Shytle ... F... Glenn Flynn
Odsll Griffin . F. T. B. Freeman
Murgel Pittillo C... Neal Rogers
W. Pryor ... G.... Frank Hill
Delmar Pryor G. Guy Lancaster
ELKS LODGE WILL
CONVENE TONIGHT
The Hendersonville lodge of the
Elks will meet tonight at 7:30
o'clock at the Woodman of the
World hall. All members are urg
ed to attend.
RANKING OFFICIALS ADVISE F.K.
GOVERNMENT MUST SPONSOR
AIR DEFENSE PILOT TRAINING
By MACK JOHNSON
Copyright 1938 By United Press
WASHINGTON, Dec. 20. (UP)
—High-ranking administration of
ficials informed President Roose
velt yesterday that the govern
ment must sponsor a training
program for thousands of civilian
airplane pilots to avert a short
age which jeopardizes an efficient
national defense program.
Gravity of the problem was em
phasized at an hour-long confer
ence between the chief executive,
Chairman Edward J. Noble of the
Civil Aeronautics Authority, Ro
bert Hinckley, member of the
CAA, Assistant Secretary of War
Louis Johnson, and National Youth
Administrator Aubrey Williams.
The United Press was informed
reliably that the conferees stressed
the aerial expansion programs of
other powers, including Germany,
Italy, Soviet Russia, France and
Great Britain, and urged that
there be an adequate civilian "pi
lot backlog" established in this
country.
It was understood that plans dis
cussed envisage use of vocational
training facilities of the NYA and
other agencies, which are financed
from relief appropriations.
Mr. Roosevelt was repersented
as "deeply interested" but not
yet ready to announce a decesion.
Noble said recently that he be
lieved the United States should
have a minimum of 250,000 pri
vate planes, 25 times the current
supply, and that 20,000 pilots
should be trained annually during
(Continued on page three)
JAP REPRISALS
IN U. S. AID TO
CHINA HINTED
But Diplomats See Britain
As Bearing Brunt of
Tokyo's Ire
MAY BAR TRADERS IN
CHINA HINTERLAND
H. O. THOMPSON
United Pres* Staff Correspondent
TOKYO, Dec. 20. (UP)—Diplo
mats suggested today that Japan
might retaleate against the Unit
ed States for granting China a
"war credit" of $25,000,000 by
further tightening restrictions
against Americans in the Japan
ese occupied areas of China.
It was believed, however, that
Japanese wrath still would be di
rected chiefly against Great Brit
ain as the Japanese insist that the
American credits were British-in
spired and that Britain has done
far more than the United States
in encouraging nationalist China
to continue fighting the Japan
ese.
The section of Foreign Minis
ter Hachiro Arita's statement of
last night which aroused the
greatest interest' was that in
which he said that the Anglo
American credits would have re
sults opposite from those antici
■pjtvdmaid would prolong the "em
barrassments and inconveniences
of third powers in the occupied
areas of China."
In plain language it was believ
ed the foreign minister meant
that British and American trad
ers, missionaries and others wish
ing to visit the interior of China,
will be barred by Japan so long
as London and Washington con
tinue their policies of supporting
Chinese Nationalist Generalissimo
Chiang Kai-shek.
The foreign minister, who had
been asked by foreign corre
spondents for comment on the
Anglo-American credits, said he
considered the granting of these
loans as "regrettable acts" which
will not prevent the Japanese peo
ple from creating the "new or
der" they are determined to set
up in eastern Asia.
U. S. AGAIN AIDS
CHINA'S FINANCES
WASHINGTON, Dec. 20. (UP)
The United States government
moved for a second time within
a week last night to ease the fi
nancial stress in China created by
Japan's undeclared war.
Following a $25,000,000 credit
extended to Chinese commercial
interests by the Export-Import
bank, Secretary of the Treasury
Henry Morgenthau, Jr., announc
ed that a fiscal arrangement as
suring the Chinese government
adequate dollar exchange facili
ties had been continued by this
country beyond December 31,
1938.
The arrangement was negotiat
ed in July, 1937. It enables the
Central Bank of China, under con
ditions which safeguard the inter
ests of both countries, to obtain
dollar exchange for stabilization
purposes against gold which Chi
na has in federal reserve banks
here earmarked for that nation's
monetary reserves.
The treasury declined to reveal
the size of this gold hoard, or how
it was acquired. It is known, how
ever, that some of it represents
(Continued on page five)
DISTRICT BOY SCOUT OFFICERS
AND COMMITTEE NAMED; LAY
FURTHER EXPANSION PLANS
«
Chairman Patla, Other Of
ficers Re-elected; Will
Hold Dinner Conference
on January 5
Nathan Patla, chairman of the
Hendersonvile district Boy Scouts
committee for the past year,
Mayor A. V. Edwards, vice-chair
man, and J. H. Lampley, treasur
er were all re-elected at a meet
ing of the committee at the city
hall yesterday afternoon. Mr.
Lampley has served for five years
as treasurer of the organization.
Members of the district com
mittee, lecter yesterday after the
report of the nominating commit
tee, were as follows: H. E. Buch
anan, A. V. Edwards, Steve Por
ter, L. Y. Biggerstaff, J. T. Fain,
Jr., R. C. Gibbs, E. A. Smyth, III,
E. R. Sutherland, F. M. Waters,
F. B. Gardner, Nathan Patla,
Rev. L. T. Wilds, A. P. Cox, Rev.
James P. Burke, J. H. Lampley,
Dr. R. H. Brown, J. C. Coston,
John Farmer, and 0. B. Crowell.
In addition, all chairmen of
troops committees in the county
are automatically members of the
district committee.
After the election, Chairman
Patla announced the committees
and committee heads for the cora
; ing year as follows: Rev. Wilds,
j chairman of the committee on ad
, vanct-ment; health and safety
committees, Dr. Brown, Mar.
Smyth and Mr. Buchanan; organ
I ization,. Mr. Gibbs, Mr. Farmer,
and Rev. Burke; camping and ac
j tivities, Messrs. Biggerstaff, Cox
and Sutherland; training, Messrs.
j Waters, Gardner and Porter; fL
| nance, Messrs. Lampley, Coston
and Crowell; and publicity, Mr.
i Fain.
I A lull report was maae yester
day afternoon by Mr. • Gibbs,
i chairman of a committee recently
• name to make a survey of pos
| sible locations for new torops and
sponsoring agencies.
The report covered the scout
' ing sit "tion in various communi
ties in the county, including Tux
edo, Blue Ridge school, East Flat
Rock, Fletcher, Balfour, Flat
Rock, Valley Hill, Dana, Edney
ville, Bat Cave, Etowah, and Mills
River. Prospects are good for
early establishment of scout
troops in some of these commun
ities, Gibbs reported.
The committee on organization
will continue its efforts in this
work during the year, and is
shortly expected to outline plans
for the extension and consolida
tion of scouting in the entire
county over a five-year period.
As a part of the program of
extending scouting into the com
munities of the county, a dinner
meeting will be held on January
5, at which time representatives
of various communities will be in
vited to attend for a discussion of
plans and procedures in setting
up new troops.
Mr. Patla announced yesterday
that registration for members of
Troop 13 were now in the hands
of Scout Executive Allen, of
Asheville.
Attending the meeting yester
day were Chairman Patla, Execu
I tive Allen, and committee mem
bers, Messrs. Edwards, Wilds,
' Waters, Fain, Gibbs, Lampley and
I Farmer.
CHRISTMAS MUSIC
PLAY IS PLANNED AT
FLETCHER TONIGHT
FLETCHER, Dec. 20.—The
: primary grades of the Fletcher
school will present an operetta in
two acts, "A Trip to Santa Land"
on Tuesday evening, Dec. 20, at
! 7:30 o'clock.
i The Little Girl (played by
: Mary Ann Davis) who does not
: believe in Santa Claus, fairies or
brownies, but by the help of the
Story Book friends, the little girl
is induced to believe in them.
About fifty children are taking
part. Old Santa will be present.
The operetta is under the direc
tion of Miss Bonita Bruce, Mrs.
W. N. Lane and Miss J. Wolfe.
A small admission will be charg
ed. The parents of the children
taking part in the operetta will
be admitted free. Money obtained
will be used to buy school library
books.
POPE'S ANNIVERSARY
VATICAN CITY, Dec. 20. (UP)
Pope Pius XI observed the 59th
anniversary of his ordination of
the priesthood today with a busy
schedule, attesting to his vigor in
his 82nd year of life.
Tenderfoot Scout
Rank Conferred
On Eight Boys
Two Are Made Scout First
Class; Merit Badges
Awarded
Sixteen Boy Scouts received
promotions or awards of merit at
the Court of Honor, held at the
city hall last night.
Rev. L. T. Wilds, pastor of the
Presbyterian church, and chair
man of the court, presided, and
the court was opened with the ad
vance of the colors.
The tenderfoot investure was
conducted by A. W. Allen, scout
executive of Daniel Boone Coun
cil, and this rank was conferred
on the follbwing Scouts: David
Satterfield, Morris Dermid, Cedric
Reid, Paul Smith, John Corbih,
and Francis Ray, all of Troop 13;
Ted FitzSimons, Troop 1, and Bil
ly Donnahue, Jr., Troop 1.
Second class rank was oonfer
red on Eugene Kelly, Glen Row
land, Jack Featherstone, and Ed
win Dixon, all of Troop 1, by J.
T. Fain, Jr.
First class rank was conferred
on Kenneth end'Bobb? Hinsdale,
both of Troop 1, by F. M. Waters.
Merit badges were presented
by Nathan Patla, chairman of the
district committee , as follows:
Gordon Stepp, Troop 1, handi
craft; and George Wilkins, Troop
1, first aid, public health, and
safety.
The banner, presented to the
troop having the most candidates
for advancement, was presented
to Troop 1.
Lima Declaration
Draft Is Victory
For Argentinans
By HOBART C. MONTEE
Copyright 1930 By United Pre««
LIMA, Peru, Dec. 20. (UP)—
A compromise proposal on a dec
laration of continental solidarity
designed to end a deadlock be
tween the United States and Ar
gentine delegations, was circulat
ed today among delegates to the
eighth Pan-American conference.
The compromise, drawn up by
Carlos Concha and Afranio De
Mello Franco, chief delegates of
Peru and Brazil, would bind the
21 Pan-American republics to
present a united front against ag
gression by either an American or
a non-American nation. Not only
armed aggression but any other
activity, such as political pene
tration, which might impair the
national institutions of an Ameri
can republic would call for united
action. .
There were indications that the
compromise draft might be fur
ther revised after conferences
among chief delegates. As it
stands, the compromise represents
a victory for Argentina in that it
includes aggression by an Ameri
can nation against another Amer
ican nation.
Balfour P.-T. A. to
Meet This Week
The regular monthly meeting
of the Balfour Parent-Teacher as
sociation will be held in the
school auditorium on Wednesday
night, December 21, at 7:30
o'clock.
The meeting will be featured
by a play, "On Christmas Hill,"
priven by members of the first,
fifth, and sixth grades.
JOHN PAUL LUCAS
SAID CONVALESCING
Hendersonville friends of John
Paul Lucas, vice president of the
Duke Power company of Charlotte
have been grieved to learn of his
serious illness during the past sev
eral weeks. Mr. Lucas is in Duke
University hospital in Durham,
where he .is now thought to be re
covering from a ' surgical opera
tion. Latest reports of his condi
tion are favorable,
COOPERATIVE
MEDICAL AID
FOILED, SAID
Farm Union Man Says
Fann Help Cut Would
Start Revolt
WALLACESAYS CROP
CONTROL FAVORED
WASHINGTON, Dec. 20. <LT>
A federal grand jury today re
turned criminal indictments charg
ing violation of anti-trust laws
against the American Medical As
sociation. three affiliated medical
groups, and 21 individuals.
One of the indicted officials was
Dr. Morris Fishbein, editor of the
American Medical Association
Journal and outstanding spokes
man for conservative elements of
the medical professional
The indictments are based on
the charge that the defendants
combined to block co-operative
medical moves. < ■ • -
THATCHERWARNS OF
FARM AID CUTS
WASHINGTON, D«c. 20. (UP)
M. W. Thatcher, national legisla
tive representative of the Tanner*
Union* said today after a confer
en , with President Roosevelt that
any effort to balance the budget
Bymttn* 1^*00.000.000 to *3,
000,000*000 from federal appro
priations "would be certain to
cause a revolution."
Thatcher urged President Roose
velt to provide a farm benefit pro
Eam of at least $800,000,000 dur
I the next fiscal year. He pro
posed to finance the program
with increased income and estaiu
taxes.
WALLACE WOULD
EXPAND AAA WORK
WASHINGTON, Dm. 29. (UP)
—Secretary • of Agricultre Henry
C. Wallace, asserting that the na
tion's farmers overwhelmingly fa
vor New Deal crop controF&gis
lation, pr*4icted ytstefd# that
the measure will be strengthened
and improved next year in order
to be of greater bsnt®t all gg
gricultural workers. v<- -
Wallace based his conelusoins
on the results ef crop referenda
: held among growers of cotton,
rice, and three types of tobacco.
Although only the cotton growers
gave the two-thirds majority nec
essary to begin operations of
marketing quotas, he said the
referenda "constitute remarkable
endorsement" of AAA programs.
The secretary's statment was
made shortly after the crop re
porting board in Its final report
of the year, estimated 1938 wheat
productoin at 930,801,000 bushr
els—the fourth largest crop in
American history—and com at
2,542,238,000 bushels, slighly
lower than last year's harvest.
The board's estimates, both
above average, presaged bumper
crops for the second sueceaiive
year. The general appearance of
abundance, the report said, is due
"in part to the relatively small
numbers of livestock on the farms
to consume grain and to a lowor
level of domestic and foregn de
mand that was considered normal
a few years ago."
4 Shopping Days
Till Christmas
T OMONG BACK TO CHRIST.
L MAS FOUft TIAKI AOO~~
Dionne quints . enjoying Arit
Christmas. . . . Legion <( De
cency launching campaign
•gainst film filth. . . . Fleming -
ton, N. becoming overnight
boom town on eve of Haujrt
raann trial. . . . Best toll*:
"So Red the Hose" ,. Charred
bulk of Monro Castle being re
moved from Hew Jersey beach.
."It wip merry season lor
Hew Desi, Just upheld In mkh
tan election*. *
.'rtsra?* .

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