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The Tulsa star. (Tulsa, Okla.) 1913-1921, June 13, 1913, Image 6

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The Tulsa Star, Friday, June 13, irji3.
ihfc
MAN IN THE ION
Again Witnessed a Scene Which
Probably Is Old as
Himself.
DY GEORGE MUN30N.
"I inn sorry, .Miss .Mnrston. that you
havo decided to sover your connection
with thU observatory," said l'rofcssor
Hlytlio, rathur sternly. "Hut at our
ugu I can understand that tho Isolntlon
of llfo in thuso parts Is not wholly
congenial. In fact, If I may bo per
mitted to Buy bo, I havo often won
dorcd that you could emluru a year In
such a town as Kmerald. You wish to
get hack to thu world of mon or I
beg your pardon, .Miss Mnrston. I
didn't mean It In that sense."
Dospltu his llvo and forty years tho
Professor fairly quailed bctoru tho
young woman nt the recollection of lila
faux pas. Tho Professor was as exact
ub tho charts ho drew, and boiiiu said
that his heart Has as dry. Hut any
old bachelor at forty llvu Is apt to bo
that way.
"I muan, Miss .Mnrston, that nt your
ngo ono naturally desires congenial so
clety." "It Isn't that, Professor," answered
tlio joung woman, almost as embar
rassed as thu savant. "I havo enjoyed
my tlmo hero Immcnsoly Hut 1 havo
decided to go."
"And tonight," Bald tho Professor ro
luctnutly, "must bo our last view of tho
heavens together, then. Tho lcgond
that locates Paradlso In tho celestial
regions Is n singularly fortunate one.
Ono loses, In contemplating tho heav
ens, tho senso of tho pettiness of
earth. I can Imnglno no greater felic
ity than watching the stnrs with u con
genial companion "
Then hu broke- off nbruptly, for
tho second tlmo ho had been about to
iimkfi a "break."
Iu fact tho Professor felt singularly
disconcerted at tho approaching resig
nation of hli asslstnnt In thu big
Arizona observatory ho had experi
enced great dlniculty In obtaining u
uutlsfnctoryxflBlstatit. .Men had como
and gone; hut, until .Miss .Mnrston an
Hwered his last advertisement from
lialtlmoro, ho hnd been unablo to
mako any ndvanco with his work ut
An Instant Later She Was Gone.
all. And now alio was going, too, nnd
thu great work of mapping out tho
two now craturB which ho had discov
ered would bo greatly, retarded And
hu could not nTortl to disappoint thoso
who were expecting his report at tho
next meeting of thu Astionomlcal soci
ety. They wero seated together In tho ob
servatory a few hours later. The moon
was full and thu clear ntmpsphcro
mudu observation oxtromely easy. I)o
spltu this, however, tho work pio
ceeded very slowly Indeed. illss Mars
ton Bcemcd nu preoccupied as tho Pro
fessor. "I don't know how over I shall com
plete thu chart without ou, .Miss
.Mnrston," said tho Professor. "I must
sny thut for a woman )nu havo an ex
trumely seluntlflc mind .Most )oung
SiBF
women, looking at tho moon, nre, I am
told, apt to tako foolish and lomnutlc
notions. For Instance, tho outline of
thoso areas which wo call continents
Is foolishly compared with tho face of
11 man, who Is popularly considered, I
understand, to wntch over tho sicken
ing sentimentalities of lovers As
tlioiiKli thu puro and exact sclcuco of
astiouomy could bo compared with
such idiotic phllanderlugs! Do ou nut
agieo with me, .Miss .Marston?"
"Yes," answered MIhs Miuston In a
low olco.
"Not that I havo anything against
lovo," Professor III) thu continued "It
Is, I piesumo, a necessary evil. Hut It
should bo faced with equanimity and
serenity, Uko death, nut mndo the sub
Ject for senseless comparisons and
nights of untrained fancy W'oro you
over In lovo, Miss Mnratimn
"I can see that jou weren't, and
cpuldn t be," exclaimed .Miss Marston
rising suddenly nnd speaking wltb
somothlne approaching anger. "Good
night, Professor Hlythe."
An Instant later she was gone, leav
ng tho Professor quite astonished al
her sudden departure.
"Why," ho ruminated, ".Miss .Mars
ton was almost almost fomlnlno to
njght." And this started him upon a
new and strango courso of cogitation
"Miss Mnrston has gone, Professor,"
said tho elderly housekeeper when ho
descended from his observatory lator
that evening.
Gono!" ejaculated tho Professor In
surprise.
"Gono homo to Hnltlmorn hv tt.n
night train," sho answered, looking nt
him significantly. Hut tho Professor
only murmured his surprise, nnd If ho
thought about Miss Marston subse
quently ho kept his rollcctlons to him
self. Hut tho work of mapping out tho
now craters proved unexpectedly dull.
Tho young fellow who succeeded his
employu was utterly Incompetent and
quickly vanished Tho Professor be
moaned his 111 luck to Mrs. Illgglns.
"I'd glvo anything In tho world to
get Miss Marston back," he said "Sho
was tho best assistant I over had."
"Well, why don't ou got her?" In
quired tho housekeeper.
"Get her!" ejaculated tho ProfesBor.
"Why, sho wanted to go homo: bIio
was tired of tho work.
Mrs. Illgglns smiled sourly nnd
thrust her elderly features within n
fow Inches of tho Professor's
"Do jou know wh sho left?" sho
asked. "Hecauso peuplo wero talk
lug about jou and her and thinking
jou were going to bo married. No
lady could stand for that."
"Hless my bouI! No lady could stand
for getting married?" Inquired Profes
sor III) tho.
"No, stnnd for talking about it when
It wasn't so. Thoro!" said tho house
keeper. Tho Professor went away In deep
thought.
"Do you think sho would corao
back?" ho Inquired tho next ecnlng
"I mean if If '
"Try her," responded Mrs Illgglns.
grimly. So that night a letter went off
to Baltimore and, ten days later. Miss
Mnrston appeared, resplendent In a
new hat and gown.
"Well, I'm ready," sho announced.
"I feel very guilty to havo left you,
Professor, that Is, heforo wo finished
tho craters."
They went up Into tho n'.-.'rvatnry
together. Hut somehov. u. iiher of
them could work that 1 vuilng. And
as ho sat hesldu Miss Marston Profes
sor Hlytho felt tho strangest Impulso
to keep her there. Ills right arm,
which seemed to havo acquired an nu
tomatlc motion Independent of Ills con
trol, gradually moved out until Profes
sor Illy thu found that It was encircling
Miss Mnrston's wnist
"Do jou think you could cr marry
mo?" ho blurted out "You know, wo
must vvorV an thoso craters together"
"Oh, bother tho craters!" said Miss
Marston. "Alfred, dear, I think I
could, only do jou really want me for
myself or for tho work?"
"For yourself, darling!" exclaimed
tho Professor with sudden rapture
"When I alt hero and look nt that old
moon, why, ho Just Booms to bo watch
ing us nnd telling us to bo as happy
as wo can, tho dear old fellow!"
And tho man In tho moon saw two
peuplo kissing behind the telescope.
(Copyright. 1913. by V. G Chapman')
Set New Idea In Building.
Francis K. Kimball, who provided
tho basic Idea for modern caisson
emulation construction, entered tho
employ of a builder at tho ago of four
teen, mid has devoted his life to that
lino of work. Ho stopped designing
and building to servo In tho Civil
war, hut has suffered no interruption
since. At one tlmo ho went to Kng
land, where ho was engaged as su
pervising nrchltect of Trinity college
Tho caisson Idea camo to him while
erecting a building In Now York.
TrcacheroiiH sands wero encountered.
compelling him to seek a new method
fur excavating fur tho foundation Ills
career has been marked by original
ity, and hu has overcome man) ohtta
cles In construction and oftabllhliod
mnny precedents In method. Ho Is
a member of tho New York chapter of
thu American Institute of Aichltects
Green First.
An Irishman who was too old for
active woik waH olYorud tho posltluu
of crossing tender at a small railroad
Btatlon Ho looked dubious as the
duties of tho olllco weiu explained to
him and tho meaning of tho various
Hags was clearly stated.
"In tho case of danger with 11 train
coming, of course, ou wave tho nnl
Hag," said Ills friend, proceeding with
his explanation A hard old hand
g;rasped his arm.
" "Man, dear, It'll never do," said Pat
rick, slinking his head Mileumly "I
could nover tniBt nieself to romumlier
to wnvo n led Hag whin there was n
green wnn handy." Cut lent l.ltor.i
turo
To the Overmodett.
Glvo what )ou havo To inmeonu
It may bo better than jou dare tu
think.--Longfellow,
Tlxe
Ame
Horn
WIlLOArf
4?ADFOra
MBattx
Mr. William A ltmlford will answer
questions and glvo ndvlco rilin: OP
CO.HT on alt subjects ptrtnlulng to tho 1
subject of building, for tlio render of tills
paper. On account of Ills wldo experience
as lalltor. Author nnd Manufacturer, lie
Is, vvltlmut doubt, tho hK-hest nuthorlty '
on nil tliee siitijeeti Ailrlreas alt Inquiries
to XVIIllnm lln,1rnp.1 V 1-0 1-A. I
Jackson boul. nnl, Chicago, ill . and only
cucloso two-cent stamp for riply.
It Is plainly evident to all observors
tbat tho number of peuplo who tako nu
Intelligent Interest In houso planning
and house building Is Increasing Tho
popular press reveals this tendency
very clearly Illustrations of modern
houses and discussions of architectu
ral subjects aro overflowing from tho
technical press, finding a placo In thu
newspapers and popular magazines
This grov.lng Interest amonr; tho
peoplo Is. all to tho good. Architect
ure has suffered too long from popu
lar Ignorance nnd popular apathy
Generally speaking, people got tho
kind of architecture they like and thu
kind of building they are willing to ac
cept. Thero Is enough architectural
genius and enough skilled craftsman
ship In our midst today to transform
every town and village Into a thing
of beauty nnd to provldo every fam
ily with a beautiful and healthful
homo.
If a genius of the architect and the
skill of the workman are employed, or
wasted on unworthy objects, It Is be
cause the demand for this beautiful
architecture hat not yet become (en
oral and Insistent. No doubt. It la at
so due to the fact that some who ap
preclatn and desire good architecture
havo not the means to command it.
Hut tho want of money Is secondary
Tho matter of primary Importance Is
that people should havo right Ideas as
to what constitutes good architecture
and sound building nnd should luslbt
whenever they cause buildings to be
put up upon having only thoso whUli
are both well designed and mil built
Good building, the first tssentiat.
and here, no doubt. Is a point of dan-
j per. Tho jKipularUlng of archltee-
; turo Is n good thing so long as the Je-
1 innnd Is for good architecture A great
unlnstructed public demanding
floor Plan.
"quaint" houses and "plctunwju"
bungalows would K't what It wants,
hut the rvsult I not llkel) to make
for rent progress In architecture, or
for henllh) condition In tho building
trade
When the house hunting man turns
witli dlHKio-t rioiu the demi tide Yllla
nMdiin- '" uniih ili'' iii-ii-. agents
have direeti d Ills nil t"n and tried
iii -,, 11 1.. I i.ll.'' n i' -i' liitld
lllllisi ll H h Ml-i ill 1 Id 11 ti In nH
nnd hi wiU-a i.li.u.. li tal" a v i
right and prnpi r courso. but he In apt '
tu go about It In a uroni; .i lie tu ,
yMm' 'ri :
3. .
KlTCMoL iT"
,.. J BtDExxvx
u-i" :i"x'
. I""
I LlXIMUVV
- ""
A. .JMmi
MX
V" Btlrau
BfJV'B fc'
tft&r'Y
i mi,,. ..
' w
.m ma,
i . J tfe'JZS'
.--...fV
,-iySi;-
r
iti-s uu architect to design him a ' pic
turesquo" houso with nooks and bay
windows nnd overhnnglng eaves It
Is to contnlu accommodations which
might reasonably be supplied fur $1,
000, biit It Is to cost not a penny more
than Jll.OOu That Is to begin nt thu
wrong end.
If a man's thief ambition Is that all
the landscnpo painters In the neigh
borhood should come and erect their
easels before his house, he docs well to
concern himself primarily with gabb-s
and nooks; but if he hold with Hacon
thnt "houses are built to live In and
not to look on" he will do well to
give more attention to the foutidne a
of the walls and roof and the relative
positions of dining room and kitchen
Let the man with (3.000 to spend de
termine that he wilt hare as much
good sound building as (2,000 will buy
and therewith be content If this
means being content with two sitting
rooms Instead of the desired three, or
abandoning n projected Ingle-nook,
there Is a FOlid consolation In the
knowledge that all the material used
In the house Is thoroughly sound and
has been put together In a workman
like manner
When the essential thing good
building Is secured, a man may Hnd
It possible to Indulge hit fancies In
many matters of detail, but he should
be warned against too earnestly striv
ing after the Ideal of the picturesque
Having determined on the accommoda
tion he desires and can afford, be will
be well advised to be guided In regard
to the design by his architect.
Tt. !!' cotuge Illustrated here
itli Is an rx.iii 1 . a li tt.,ir
cuglll) COLftrin.'. d .11. d n'r . j,.d at.
lordir.g to th. v. b -' d 1, for ion
veniiiiet ii a: th. i . ti . some
little thought has bun - :o make
the bu'ldu..: .ittrait've ri iri'-'.tnr.ce
U TtU'u' .1 I ' " i'i -' I t 's 0Ot-
VVr 5..-W tUi ore-room cottage has
been built using the rvry best mvtc
ods of construction and fiaualn the
building on the tasldt with ok. b.rx
and yellow pice
A glnc a: ih ?ccr piss "; a-.-w
the ii!rK fvcaj vt r trvkafv
meot. Ttie Uta -!.. i-ui tta.
iwm r ft U-v (w xzi ngna to
gether b mz ' ia Arvft vvn-zt
The k!u-aa '. w.l i fvai 11
met ot A i'."i". V n MysL-ifoi
tivu th il 3 it -win v a jst-
u uvuomu- i1? .a )m Vvo v.n.i
to be irry '.'!.'.- tlwcw i-v
two (xvd Sisvd 9d"vH.'.'. i-try v,.
pUcwii. T ftUltvcui j .vavva'va-.
t los-tet
The attic pa,- '-i .Si cvttagv j
vsiuabie fw storau i'uvvw -vJ
ice It U wU vvu: U:i turxv tj
kep the fimt stwry wkvI during the hot
u'umer aeji:hr The exterior U sld
evl lth outboard, having banj
courses srj corner boards used for or
uairetunl eject. The cornice I rath
er wide aud Is of open timbered con
(ruction Altogether this Is an ex
coptlonatlv attractive and economical
llttlo residence for the small family !
Maying Dj.
Hacon -X see salt will remove
grease spots from the top of n stove'
Kgbert - Welt, It applied In a certain
way. kerosene will not only removo
the grease spots, but UI remove the
stove
Paradoxical Position.
These Is one very queer thing utmu'
our )tim of politics."
"tt'lwi la that?"
"Wh ii ii man is nininii", nr nl'ie
hu hU to till lull l.l bl.U.Uo I,. i '
1 S . I38PS4 ' ' '' ' mta
a . -. ffiVWTCTSTiraHYAl 111
Jizr jcir?-njaj
L--rV.
.--' 'i. ,zr-w
THOSE RHEUWATIC
TWINGES
Much of tlio rlicu- ".
matlc pain that
I.WIIIW3 111 U.llll, ""5i.fc
chaneint! weather Is "x3
thu work of uric
fl-lil r.lilo
.i-..,ll.a ntililn. 1 L
cut, tear orhiirtauy 11 (jXln
worso when tho af '' Pol
fectrd musclo Joint
is used
If suchatt.iclisaro
marked wr.h head
ache, Kickuche du
llness and iVtiirh
ance of tho untie,
its tlmo to help tlio
weakened lo lncjj
Doans Kidney
Pills quirkly help
rick kidneys
1 k .A.." Ororfon Cinn
ii'1'1 ? !! -v"".'i: t-i tint Ht Th
mil" " Mrhmk be.l siilriniM
hMl M.. p , r uranium T lie klitm-gr e. re
U..l, h-i nil, tn fi I, i,, , t ,,
lunj tiuir.atili, .1 in- !,, ., ,,,
tilurt)l Mr ki.1i.. m i.an.,.lir,lori'1il,i
lh..tik i- I i t 1 I. kii . Ki.lM, )I'I1KI,
ri-r titiilii 1 .Hi.. ,1 nii.ulil,. una tor
uTrrtlit'OIean U,J , ur,. ,,., , 1 !,,, ,u,hl..
Cl Do.n'i at Aur Slore, 50t a tlox
D CAN'S "..Vl.r
rOSTER M1U1UHN CO., I1UFIAI O. N. Y.
A 1 . 1
the tr .t'i
i' -1 1'itabli tlinn
Mra. vrnju.-w a ivnniMng Hjmp for Chllilrrl
Irrthlnf .flu ;i,, ,-mi,,. re. In. r '.unll.lilif
Uoullaj J.iu.i ma. iuj i-o lc,V n lulllcUia
1 know no -11. 11 tiling uh ginlus,
genius I nuth.ii,, bat luhur and dill
gence Hogarth
aiioi si.s iiik Mini xn 11 1111 ns
. 1111 III mill
T IMS fltao4ael a t ral -lifnuilM laiirf .m
IH't I., ak.D Sri 1 Maiaria "ul of I Ii hi. . ,1 u h.t
t.ouuoii-tiim. AiriMtuiua. tori.Juiui.uJ
BllSfv. UK.
Extremes.
"1 ran out with ni) uew machine
"What happened?"
! got run in "
Sute Lands Sold.
Minnesota In 1912 has Mild '."jou
acres of state lands al prices ranging
from Ove tu twenty-one dollars uu
acre.
Progress.
"Thirty years ago." snid a woman
of middle age, 'It was the iiiHtom of
demure girls to sit in piiblii eouvi.)
nuces with the'- silk-gloved wrists
crossed It Is now the custom of do
mure girls to sit In public coiiw vaiici'a
with their silk stockinged nnkb cross
ed "New York Sun.
Plenty of Tuel.
"Coal's out," announced the ofln.o
boy.
"I'm."
' Shall 1 try to scare up souiu
more" '
"No," said the rurul editor spring
I ni'iiin will be coming In soon '
1 Hopeless Cue.
I MihS Irene Gllllcuddy, of Millwile
Miss, writes: "I have a gi ntl iu.hi
in. 'ii J who has been keeping luiup.ii,
"Uh me all this tar, but li. Lis
iiv.r iiit-'icated or Inlimatid ilia' i
m-1,. s to be cousidt red otln r tho a
in iid of mine I am nlne-..n . i s
.Id. lth rub) lipa. rose-pink ili..h
(iii. ii hair aiure e.ves and a , ntl
Jn, .sltion IV vou thluk I t-t . ul
Ii ii up tome miatlttoe and ,i. cl
.I.' ally stand betn-ath It wlul. I. is
an Jnd jut to I'luoursR.' nun
Irt tie. if a voiing man ii. .N 'he
iT.Cv uragcn'.t nt of nil'tlitoe ui U. r t .
i-rv-un ii :hr I no hot . f. r
r
In Summer
ivo the body needs
but rmlc f.od, that little
tlvuki be jprxctizing and
DouraJuag.
Then about the best
uoJ riKt convenient tiling
coc can h.vve handy is a
fMilagt- of
Post
This food is fully cook
ed crisp, delicious nnd
ready lo servo direct from
the package.
Post To.tslie3 willi fresh
strawberries nnd cream
are haid lo beat.
"Tlio Memory Lingers"
Sob by (Iroccrs.
I'tiMiini I pr ill Ciiii.inuiy l.lnilte.1,
lUill. I in k, ln II, I U A.
TB V
Uffr
Vv'jVs'rS I'I'I"

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