OCR Interpretation


El Paso daily herald. (El Paso, Tex.) 1881-1901, September 30, 1897, Image 3

Image and text provided by University of North Texas; Denton, TX

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86064199/1897-09-30/ed-1/seq-3/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

Washington Dining Hall
20'J KL PASO STREET, EL PASO, THAS.
REST RESTAURANT IN CITY
ALL THE DELICACIES OF THE SEASON.
RSOULiAR- DINNER IS TO Q I- M.
OPEN DAY
Y HitTO- So OO.PROP3
IBS STAR IVERY. FEED AND SALE
Corner West Oy ?rland
aWu'i1nittii,-'''T-i)--ffitlt''
Thos. Ehrenberg.
Carriage and.
Wagon Paiiitei4.
320 El Paao Street,
EL. PASO, TEXAS.
o
o
o
o
0
o
HOUCK & DEITER,
IMPORTERS and JOBBERS
FINE
WINES AJND WJiioKliiS
AGENTS forj
220 El Paso St.
Phones: Office, 211.
. J.
Pine Merchant Tailoring,
And Gents' Furnishing Goods.
ID4 urt. PASO STRTCET.
sb:
Gives the Highest Price
FOR HOUSEHOLD GOODS AND
SELLS AT THE LOWEST.
Hiin - - - 116 Oregon Street,
Try
J. R. McGIBBON,
809 El Paso Street, Opera House Block.
New and. Second-hand. Furniture
STOVES, ST. CLAIR STEEL RANGES, CROCKERY, LAMPS.
GLASSWARE, ETC.
Refrigerators Cheap in Order to Close Out.
EMERSON & BERRIEN,
Undertakers,
IM and SM E Paeo St. Phone Tl
Link Restaurant,
B31 Paso; Street
A First-Class Short Order House
Open "Day and Nisrht.
ROUTE "Zj
DOUBLE DAILY
. . . TRAIN SERVICE!
with Buffet Sleepers
Only Standard Guage Line Running Through
Sleepers to the City of Mexico.
Night and Morning Connections it
Kew Orleans with lines to
YORK, PifiJ 4DELPHIA, WASHINGTON, ATLANTA, CINCINNATI, ST. LOUIS,
MEMPHIS AND CHICAGO.
AND Mum
"W moo
3TNTO. WQR.
and Santa Fe Streets.
Phone 92. J. CALDWELL, Prop
Caldwell Undertaking Co.
306 S. El Paso Street,
The Leadir.g Undertakers,
Phones 197 and 92.
CALLS
ANSWERED DAY Of NIGHT
J. E.
NAG LEY. Mna:-
WllLIAM J. LEMP BREWING CO., St. Louis, Mo
PADST BREWING CO., Mllwaakee. Wla.
El Paso, Texas
C. ROSS & CO..
THE ONLY LEGITIMATE
UPERTAKHiS AD MB AIMERS.
AT 401 S. El Paso St
THE FINEST HEARSE IN TOWN.
Res. 183. Calls answered any hour.
EL PA80 TTCXAJi
1
LTOlsT
w', asm
THE REMINGTON
Standard Typewriter
MERCHANT &, MANNING.
State Agents, Dallas, Texas
M. I McKELLIGON, LOCAL AGENT.
Koom 12, Sheldon Block, El Paso, Texas.
"SUNSET BOUTE."
NEW ORLEANS AND GALVESTON
SAN ANTONIO AND GALVESTON
ft w tff w wMw
STEVEN'S SEW B JSINESS BLOCK, ON MESA AVE.
FEED THE WOK LP.
THE AMEUICAN FARMER IS OUT OF
TUG SLOUU1I OF DEjPOSU.
All Nation, of the Earth Mast This Year
Look to America for W heat ISreatl.
Price Kilns Steadily.
A New York paper says war, famine
and mi -fortun-3 ijave combined in Lu-
cpe to feive the American farmer such
. market for his wheat as he has not
in joyt d for so long that he has forgot
ten when it was. uonar wneai is noi
n!y an established fact, but there is
ivery prospect of the cereal reaching
he $1.25 figure. The mortgages which
nave been sapping the western and east-
-n farmers 01 tneir liie Diooa are
oomcd. The eri-p of the United
States is estimated at, in round num-
lers. 5-"0 000,000 bushels This means
1400,000,000 for tLe farmers.
The easiest answer to me question
where is this wheat goingy" is found
n oceword, "everywhere." Ships are
now on the ocean ojudq i aimosi
very p"rt in the civilized world where
h'ps la; d and taite in cargoes. Wheat
5 wanted a'l over the world, for the
ery simple reatoa that the demand for
read exists in the same proport on.
f he crop of India, which has really
b,-en the factor that has heretofore
Derated in the d.rection of low prices
for American wheat, is a cipher this
ear. The yield win be omparatively
othing, for just now and for some time
uast India has been the hotbed of re
oeliion, and in the face of what will
probably be one of the greatest con
flicts the world has ever known the au
thorities, either native or Engl'sh, are
ot paying much attention to the size
of th-i crop or mourning their loss. In
stead they are trying to get a supply
from somewhere, ana just now tnai
omewhere happens to be America.
ust think of exporting wheat to India!
It is like carrying coals to Newcastle.
INDIA'S SHORTAGE.
To begin with, the acreage devoted
to wheat this year in India is a million
ess than last ye.tr. Tne lan1 that was
cultivated has yielded comparatively
ittle, so 1 ttle, indeed, that it ivally
mounts to nothing, ana wnat 'nere is
the natives will sequester f o then-
elves, whenever possible. Enelmd
aonot look toother porno is of her
dominion to supj.y this shortage, and
as much as she will dislike to do so she
mu-t turn to this country to help her
prevent a famine. This means that the
American farmer win pocket a very
haDdsomsamuuat of whattbe enemies
f England are foid of referring 10
.British go a " trance muai lane
our wheat oei;ause ner own crop is
ractically a failure This, p the face
of the present tariff, will be a rather
bitter pal to swauow, dui tne menicine
must be taken, and in order to ac
complished the task more easily France
s going t( reduce her own tarin on
wheat
FRANCE S HUMILIATION.
Surely bread is the staff of life
when the proudest of nations are all
compelled to eat their own words, as it
were, and acknowledge the supremacy
of the country whom rf late they have
been .abusing so violently. It is
particularly the case with Prance, fo.-
view of her Russian-alliance she has
boasted that after this she would im
port what was necessar f in the way
of breadstuffs from that country, where
she would receive aid in proof that the
friendship of the czar was gerju'ne.
ButRusiabas many mouths tofed,
and, indeed, will herself be compel ed
to call on the United States for a
portion of the wherewithal to form her
own bread supply The grain fleets that
have hitherto . departed from OJessa
and threaded through the waters of
the Black Sea their various ways to
other ports of the world, will be absent
this year to a great extent Odessa in
1897 will not be able to make good her
famous boast that she is the greatest
grain market in the world.
Germany, too, is falling into line,
and despite the fact that she believes
herself discriminated against in the
newest of ever-changiig American
ta.-iff alterations, is humbly seeking a
supply of grain through mercantile re
presentatives in the United States, and
like the others, is getting it. The
United States is not vindictive, but.
sells even to its enemies, end all the
time the American farmer profits.
IN SOUTH AMERICA.
Looking to South America,
great quantities of wheat have hitherto
been raised and exported, we Bed that
the Argentine republic, a ways a for
midable competitor, will need our
wheat this vear instead of exporting it
as usual. A very large amount is want
ed, too, for the South American has a
good appetite, as well as his European
cousin. All along the coast of South
America is heard the same cry wbere
ever wbeatis known: "Give us mater
ial for breai !" And the American
farmer Is giving it.
From South Africacomes another cry
for wheat, and vessels have already
tailed for several of the South African
ports with huge cargoes of wheat.
Others are preparing to Sbil laden in
the same fashion. Even the Trat svaal
republic in Africa wants American
wheat this year, audit will be supplied,
There are many ships which constantly
sail between the United States-" and
South Afrca every year. This fall
there will be more.
The grain elevators in New York are
totally unable to bold the vast amounts
of wh'at which are wanted for trans
shipment abroad. Even those unwieldy
affairs k own as floating elevators,
which float about the harbor and the
east and north rivers, hare all been
called to an unusutl field of usefulness
They are filled and refilled. The only
times when they are empty are whea
they are returning from some vessel
whose hold has been filled with their
contents. No one in New York ever
remembers anything like it. The
ships are insuflieient in point of num
bers to carry oat of the harbor all the
cargoes of grain that are wanted else
where. This is the harvest time of tb
tramp steamer or sailing vessel. It is
no longer doubtful as to whether or no
a cart; o can be secared, but the ques
tion is which shipper will pay the
highest price.
ALL. OVER THE WORLD,
lo mention the individual places
where American wheat is going this
year would be to recapitulate the map
of the world. The wheat crop of the
world is short, and, therefore, the
United States must make up that short
age as best it can, and incidentally
profit immensely. It is declared by
hnanciers that In the movement of the
wheat crop New York City banks alone
will be called upon to furnish SIjO.000,-
000. This is comparatively but a drop
in the bucket. Great fortunes have
been made by the speculators, of
course, but the farmer gets the bast
of it in the long run. There will be
no nrore 50 cent wheat for many a long
year.
There are also heavy exports of corn
this year, but the price of corn has ad
vanced but little compared with that
of wheat. This is due partly to the
fact that the 1896 crop will be enormous
and there is not the samo demand for
't in other countries that there is for
wheat.
Resources of New Mexico.
The secretary of the interior has re
ceived the annual report of Gov. Otero
of New Mexico. The governor says
the population of the territory has in
creased by 10,000 since the census of
1890, and adds that it is capable of sup
porting five millions of people.
The governor dwells with special
emphasis upon the mineral and agri
cultural resources of the territory. He
sas that fruit growing is progressing
rapidly and that 11,000,000 pounds of
wool were grown last year. He states
that the culture of the sugar beet is
making rapid head way in all parts of
the territory, but especially in the
l'ec s valley, where the culture has
become well established.
A euzar factory has been established
at Eddy, and the governor makes the
prediction that this will soo i be known
as a beet sugar center. He says, how
ever, that experiment demonstrate
that the entire liio Gr.inda valley, from
Colorado to Texas, is equally well ad
apted to the culture of the beer, and
that the entire irrigable land in the
territory may thus be med. The cul
tivation of canaigre for tann:ng pur
poses is also growing to be an Import
ant industry,
The governor calls attention to the
fact that New Mexioo is a gold bearing
country and says that within the past
few years there has been a great re
newal of activity la the mines "Sev
eral districts," he sas, "have been
found and new placer beds have been
worked by new men who have taken
out thousands of d; liars," ad he adds:
"Information which is reliable from
gold camps throughout the territory
strength -ns the hope that New Mexico
will soon reap the benefit of a genuine
mining boom. Never has there been
such interest since the advent of the
railroads, in the mineral development
of the territory, especially near the
Coloredo line."
Gov. Otero says there are 5,000,000
sheep in the territory; that fu'ly 15,000
of the people are supported by the woul
industry, and that last year was the
mos't advantageous ever known in the
business. He predicts a large growth
in the industry.
The governor takes strong ground in
favor of statehood, cla'ming the peo
ple to be entirely capable of self gov
ernment. He argues that admission
into the union would be beneficial
alike to the state and the United
Stateg.
Dr. Swiaringen and Quarantine.
Health OffiVer Swearingen thinks
the scare is exazgeratcj and wants to
alleviate the embarrassing quarantine
si'ua'ion hs much as possible in order
that traffic in the state may be re
sumed. -As it is now every section of
the state is crippled with lojal quaran
tines and Dr. Swearingen's aim from
now on will be to try and show the peo
ple that Texas is in no danger from its
interior and explain why such rigid
interior quarantine is unnecessary. An
effort is now to be male, according to
reports here, to abol sh rigid interior
quarantine fo that traffic can be resum
ed. Border quarantine will be mai
tained as rigidly as ever, but the hope
is that local quarantines will ba ma'le
much milder so that trains and people
can travel from point to point, which is
practically prohibited at present under
existing quarantines.
A Pleasant Surprise
is in store for you whn you buy Dr.
Pierce's Pleasant Pellets. If you ever
took the ordinary liver pill, big and
bulky, nasty too, you'd appreciate a
good thing, especially when it is sugar
coated, tiny as a mustard seed, but
very effective. Other things being
equal, the smallest is the best in liver
p.! Is, hence "Pieaant Pellets."
"The snuff used by the pope is made
In America- ThU "particular, snuff
goes direct from Baltimore to the Vat
ican. It is the highest priced snuff in
the world, and its value is increased
several times above the original cost
aftr tha cusfoms duties havo been
paid to the Italian government.
MAXIM'S IU1XIUITE.
Problem of Sending a High Explosive Shell
Ttiroueti ao Armor liate
The following statement by Hudson
Maxim of the problem of explosive
project. les and how he has solved it
will be read with interest: Ihere can
b"e no doubt as to tbe frightful slaught
er that would ba ettected by melinite,
for one shell bursting inside a cru.ser
would destrov a ship. But until
chemists can invent a high explosive
that will penetrate armor, we fear the
pavy will have to continue to use pow
der as an explosive: for, owing to slow
burning ouiities, the shell gets in
side the ship before it bursis. At the
sama time, if chemisis can discjver
high explosive, non-sea.-nve, and a
safe explosive which is a coatradic
tion of terms then we shall all be
made happy. I shall be glad to ex
plain a hign explosive shell, as well as
high explosives, which wi 1 penetrate
armor, and which will not explode until
after tbe shell has passed through the
armor.
Now, in tha first place, wet c .impress
ed guncott n is a very powerful hign
explos.Vt;, hs powerful as No. 1 dyn
mite. This explosive cun be shot
through armor of any thickness which
the projectile is capable of penetrating,
and without exploding. There is a'so
aoother high explosive known as
maximite. invented by me U. S
PaientNo 544924 which is consider
ably more powerlul than wet guncofon,
weight for weight, as well as having a
specific gravity about three tenths
higher thin wet guncot'on, which
jives it a much higher force than gun
cotton per ui.ii vol u in
Maxim. te is a title which was nrst
applied by me to this explosive, which
is prepared as follows: A nitrogelatine
is prepared consisting oi so to so per
cent, nitroglycerine, and 15 to 20 per
cent of solub'e pyroxylin. Ihis is
frozen to ren er it stiff, and then re
duced to sawdust by a gang of saws
About 75 to 8 J parts of this explosive
sawdust is mixed and troroughly in
corporated with about 20 to 25 parts of
finely pu ped tri-nitro-cellulose, the
whole beirg saturated with water
The obiect of the fibrous tri-nitro-cel
lulose is to absorb and hold water, and
thus lesson the sensitiveness of the
compound. The compound may be
packed into shells to a density of about
1.4, holding about 15 percent of water,
the excass of water being poured off.
Projectiles filled with maximite may
be tnrown fro-n ordnance at servica
velocities with perfect safety, and
fired through armor without exploding
until it has passed entirely through, to
be detona ed by the action of the fuse
explained further on.
The chief difficulty in firing high ex
plosives through armor has not been
so much to get a fuse which will carry
asufflj en! qu nt.ty of de'-oaatlve com
pound to explode the insensitive high
explosive without iself becoming ex
ploded by the terrific saock of retarda
tion r f the shell in the act of piercing
tbe armor. It woula do no good to
shoot through armor unless we have a
fus carrying a detonator which will
live to get through the armor to ex
plode the wet guncotton or other in
sensive high explosive alter tha same
shall have parsed through. The
tremendous shock of retardation is
sufficient to instantly detonate any
fulminate or other detonative com
pound whatever.
Now, there is only one
way possible
by which a sufficient quantity of deton
ative compound can ba shot tbrougn
armor without being exploded instan
taneously upon striking the plat and
that is by relieving the detonative
charge from tbe shock of retardation,
by suspending the same within the pro
jectile in such wise that it shall con-.
stitute a sort of plunger body, so that,
upon the striking of the shell upon the
target, the velocity of tbe body of de
tonative compound is not retarded, but
pa-ses freely forward in a tube within
tbe shell without opposition, thus giv
ing the projectile time to pass through
tli plate. Now, such a fuse has been
invented Vy Prof. Phillip Alger of the
United States navy and mvse If, jointly,
and has been made and tested. It has
already been shot through four-inch
armor plate wnh satisfactory results.
It should be borne in mind that there
are two distinct spheres of usefulness
for the high explosive or aerial torpe
do; tbe one for the penetration of light
armor, and the other as a submarine
mine. A practical sys em of throwing
aerial torpf dos from ordnance may be
justly termed a system of placing and
springing submarine mines at tbe will
of tbe operator standing at the gun.
The aerial torpedo or high explosive
shell shou'd never be used against
heavy armor, for high explosives, even
in large quantities, exploded untamped
against thick armor plate can do but
little damage. The armor must be
penetrated and the shell explode inside
the vessel, or it must be used as a sub
marine mine, or the shell must carry a
sufficiently large quantity of explosive
to destroy the ship by exploding over
the deck on striking some of the super
structure.
PREHISTORIC MAN.
A Valuable Collection of Relics Placed In
the Smithsonian Institute.
There has recently been received at
the Smithsonian Institution a collec
tion which is of the greatest import
ance to the archaeologist, and which,
when all the facts concerning it are
known by the casual visitor to the
place, will be of undoubted interest,
says the Washington Star. In it are
weapons and Implements used by pre-bisro-ic,
primeval man, hundreds of
thousands of yea s ago. It may have
been that with such a weapon as is
comprised in the collection Cain kill- d
Abel, and tin re-iaents of the sfyne I
age hunted the huge monstrosities in J
the wilds of Afr'ca, the plains of If dia
and on and about tbe chalk cliffs of !
Eogland.
The collection is known a the Ston- ,
Karr contribution, having been discov
ered by thi- pro-niaent English expert
in archaeological matters inS-ima'i-!
land, on the eastern coast of Africa, '
sonn months ago. The implements
were purchased from the discoverer by
the Smithsonian Institution and plced
in tbe division of prehi-toric anthrop
ology.
Ihere are about hfty pieces in the
collection, made of Hint, or qua tide,
and ranging in t-ize from an inch or so.
in length to half a foot, some weighing
several pounds. The objects are sup-
posed to be spear heads, battle axes
aod wedges, truncheons, bludgeons, or
ua va luuj ma, uo icHiicu, ;
Gazing at them one can gain an idea
of wba. the ancestors of the human
race looked like, muscular and hairy,
coarse of form and f ature, with huge
bodies and massive limbs. Such im
plements could have been wielded by
none except a race of giants. '"
Archaeologists say that the'objects
belong to the palaeolithic agej which
is, thev also assert, thp first stone age,
palaeolithic meaning' ancient stone.
Thy kIo belong to the chipped stone,
age. pra riically tbe same, 'the ground
stone havirg come later. To be defi
nite, tbe collection, according to the
archaeologists, comprises objects made
and used by the first people who in
habited the earth.
JohQ I.. Oaesflen Not.
John L. Sullivan is out for mayor of
Boston He has won many a hard
fought batt'e, and there is no telling
what the residents of the new Athens
will do at the comng election. John
L. is no speech maker, but when it
comes to wr.ting he puts some golden
nuggets on paper. He pays no atten
tion to the rule' Of grammar; differs in
spelling from Noah Webster, but he
attains his destination just the same
with solid and catchy sentences, and
his letter to the Call, defining his
position and saying what be would do
if elected mayor, is a good enough plat
form for one to s and upon.
Among other things, John L. de
clares: "J f I was mayor I'd try to do some
thing for the poor women that have to
work for a living. If any one came to
me, lor instance, ana wao'el permis
sion to build a street railroad in the
city I was mayor of I'd say to him
'Will you give free rides to the poor
washerwomen and casbgirls and sweat
shop workers, and all others that are
honest and live by the sweat of their
brows?' If he'd consent to this, he
could build his old road, ar.d I'd like to
s "e him make a barrel of money out of
it. too, but if he did not I'd turn him
down so quick that he would never try
to build another road not while I was
mayor.
If I was mayor, doesianyboiy think
that there could be any bribery going
on if I knew about it? The man don't
live and never did who could bribe old
J-hn Li., and the city government of
ficials who tried to do any funny
business when I was in office would be
city hospital patients in mighty short
order in spite of any defense of their
duJe lawyers, and don't you forget
ir.
Do you think I'd allow any such
monkey business, if I was mayor, as
that which happened here in Boston a
few days ago, when the management of
one of the nice, big rich bugs notified
tbe authorities of a charitable insti
tute for poor children that there
wasn't any room in the school for their
inmates that all the places were filled
by the children of the richer folks who
live in the vicinity? Well, I guess
not."
Fathers of Great Men
The distinguished astronomer Kep
ler was the son of an officer in the
army; the poet Wordsworth and Sir
Walter Scott of attorneys: Chatterton
of a schoolmaster;Handel of a surgeon;
Thomas Hood and Samuel Johnson of
booksellers; Mozart of a bookbinder;
blackstone, the eminent lawyer, of a
silk mercer; the poet Pope of a linen
draper; Sir Isaac Newton of a farmer;
Thomas Arnold of a tax collector; De
Foe and Akenside of butchers: Dr.
Jeremy Taylor of a hairdresser: the
artist Turner of a barber: Christopher
Columbus of a wool comber; the great
astronomer Halley of a soap boiler;
Haydn of a wheelwright; Luther of a
miner; .Lord h.ldon, the famous lawyer,
of a collier: George Fox of a weaver;
Captain Cook of an agricultural labor
er, and last, but not least, John Bun
yan of a tinker.
Citation By Publication.
The State of Texas, to the Sheriff
or any constable of El Paso County,
Greeting: Oath therefor having been
made as required by law, you are here
by commanded that, by making publi-
cationof this citation in some news
paper published in said county once
a week previous to the return day here
of, you summon George Howland to be
and appear before the district court,
to be holden in and for the aforesaid
county of El Paso, at the Court House
thereof in the city of El Paso on the
4th Monday after the 1st Monday in
bept. A. D 1897, then and there to
answer the petition of R E. Beckham,
receiver of the El Paso National
Bank of Texas, Paintiff, filed in said
Court on the 2lst day of March A. D.
1894, and numbered on tbe Docket of
said Court 1939 against the said George
Howland, defendant in substance- as
f jllows:
Plaintiff sues as Raceiver duly ap
pointed by Comptroller of the Curren
cy of the United States of America of
tbe El Paao National Bank of Texas,
a banking corporation duly organized
under the National Banking-laws of the
United States by attachment on pro
missory note dated 20th of July, 1892,
executed by said George Howland due
on demand for tbe sum of twelve thou
sand dollars with interest from said
date at the rate of ten percent per an
num until paid, and also an additional
ten percent in case said note be placed
in the hands of an attorney for col
lection, and to foreclose a lian held by
said bank to secure said note on two
hundred and sixty-seven shares of the
capital stock of tbe compania Metalur-
gica Mexican a, a corporation duly or
ganized under the laws of the state of
New York, title to said stock being
evidenced by s'.ock certificate No. B.
6 issued by said company.
Plaintiff prays for judgment against
said George Howland for tbe amount
of said note, interest, and attorneys
fee, and for foreclosure of said lien up
on said shares of stock, and for general
relief.
Herein fall not but have you then
and there, before said court this writ,
with your return thereon, showing how
you have executed the same.
Issued this cilst day of August A. U.
1897
Witness, J. A. Escajeda, clerk of the
district court of El Paso county, Texas
Given under my hand and seal oi said
court, at office this the 31st day of
August A. U. 1S97.
J. A. Escajeda,
Clerk of the District Court of El Paso
County, Texas.
It is sa'd that the potatoe fields around
Greeley, Colorado, will produce this
year about 1,000 car loads of market
able potatoes, and that the price
ill be about 75 cents per hundred
pounds. The Sacramento mountain
potatoes market in El Paso and points
where our potatoes a-e sold are greatly
governed by the price of the Greeley
product ' as they are equal in size,
flavor, etc. the cost of transportation
for a oar load of potatoes from Greeley
to F.l Paso is about 35 cents per hun
dred; adding this to the home price and
the dealer's profits. Sacramento pota
toes should sell for at least $2.00 per
hundred in El Paso the coming fall and
winter.
The Las Vegas Optio says that there
i8 no douht about thn Black Jack garg
having held up the Guif road in north-
east New Mexico, and that thev were
seen near tort summer on tne ir way
north. As Deputy United States Mar
shall Baca, of Socorro county, with
four men followed their trail toward
the Tularoa rountry a couple of weeks
ago, it is very probab e that they
struck out for the north from that
ne;ghborhood.
i- -Booker T. Washington, the colored
orator, in a.recent speech, told a yarn
of an old negro who wanted a Christ
mas dinner and prayed night after
night: "Lord, please send a turkey to
tnis oarKy." isut none came to him
Finally he prayed: "Oh, Lord, please
send this darky to a turkey!" And be
got one that night.
FOR SALE
FINE BUSINESS CORNER, 115 x
60 feet, Mesa avenue and Texas streets.
Right in tbe line of Improvements.
$4,500 buys 15 room lodging bouse
in central part of the city. Lot, 102 x
75 feet. . Room to enlarge.
LARGE WAREHOUSE, on side
track, cheap, terms easy.
MYRTLE & ST. VRAIN STREETS,
two lots for $650.
NORTH OREGON STREET, lot and
one half, 39 feet, for $350.
HOUSE NO. 614, NORTH OREGON
street, $2,500. Easy terms.
HOUSE NO. 311, TEXAS STREET,
6 rooms, $2,000. Installments.
TWO LOTS, for $650. Corner of
Idaho and Florence streets.
NORTH STANTON STREET. 3 lots
just north of Montana street.
For Rent
STORE No. 109, El
Paso street,
in tbe city.
One of the best locations
NEW MILLS BUILDING, opposite
plaza, store and two large light base
ment NO. 1110 SAN ANTONIO STREET,"
basement of three rooms.
IN "SHELDON BUILDING." best
office building in Texas, store room
with bank fixtures and large vault.
store room foot of Oregon stree'. offices
and rooms with steam beat and eleva
tor, 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th floors.
I represent 10 leading fire insurance
companies, and write life and accident
insurance in the TRAVELER'S OF
HARTFORD CONN.
LIBERAL POLICIES LOWEST
RATES.
Property placed In mv hands exclus
ively, will be advertised free of cost to
owner.
Horace B. Stevens,
Real Estate and Insur
ance Agent.
LOOK -AT THE MAP!
We can Ticket You to
ANY PART OF THE
UNITED STATES.
Low Rates.
ELEQdNT EQUIFflEMT.
FAST TlflE.
iP. TURNER, Gen'l Pi.t'r and Tkt Agiit, DALLAS, TH
FXCURSION RITES TO CALIFORNIA.
The Southern Pacific hare not
ceased running their ever popular
bi-weekly seaside excursions to
Los Jngeles, Santa Monica, Long
Beach, San Buena Ventura and
Santa Barbara, Those for the re
mainder of the summer are sche
duled for Sept. 23, Oct. 7 and 21.
Tickets for these excursions are
sold for $45 each and are limited
for return up to 90 days from date
of sale. They are good for stop
overs in California west of Col ton,
going and returning.
Santa Barbara is a beautiful city
on the coast north of Los Angeles
and when buying to that point
purchasers by taking stop-over at
Los Angeles on either going or
coming trip or both can make side
trips to other seaside resorts by
paying the nominal local rates to
and from those points.
Should purchasers not desire to go
to Santa Barbara, tickets can be pur
chased direct to the other Beaslde re
sorts for tbe same price.
Regular round trip tickets to Los
Angeles and San Francisco with six
months final limit on sale daily at S50
and $60 respectively, good for 30 days
going, and 30 days returning, with
stop-over privileges in both directions.
Elegant Pullman buffet cars daily, and
superior Pullman tourist cars pass El
Paso west bound Saturdays and Mon
days, and leave Los Angeles, east
bound, on Thursdays and Saturdays of
each week.
No change of cars, combined with
best schedule of time.
T. E. HUNT,
Commercial Agentr
""oS MEMO r""'rl,f

xml | txt