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El Paso daily herald. (El Paso, Tex.) 1881-1901, February 15, 1898, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86064199/1898-02-15/ed-1/seq-3/

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Ie H. LESINSKY COMPANY,
Wholesale Grocers
and
Jobbers of Dry Goods.
Washington
209 EL PASO STREET,
BEST RESTAURANT IN CITY.
ALL THE DELICACIES OF THE SEASON.
RBiaTTIiAR IS TO Q I"- M.
OPEN DAY AND NIGHT
V- OO PROPS
I. SCHLINGER,
sENew York Tailor
-MAKBK
-sStylish, Perfect
AT LOWEST
Work speaks for itself
One trial will convince you.
SOMETHING NEW
At Springer's. All of our old stoolcwas burnl
and must have new goods to take their places.
Furniture, Orookery and oa.rpe"ts.
San Antonio Street.
HQUCK & DEITER,
IMPORTERS and JOBBERS
FINE WINES AND WHISKIES
- AGENTS for
220 El Paso St.
Gives the Highest Price
FOR HOUSEHOLD GOODS AND
SELLS AT THE LOWEST.
Try Him - - - 116 Oregon Street.
J. R. McGTBBON,
808 El Paso Street, Opera House Block.
JSTew and. Secon.d-h.aiicL Fiirnitiare
STOVES, ST. CLAIR STEEL RANGES, CROCKERY, LAMPS.
GLASSWARE, ETC.
Refrigerators Cheap in Order to Close Out.
Fine Merchant Tailoring,
And Gents' Famishing Goods.
in HIT, PASO STREET. - EL PASO TKXA8
Link Restaurant,
215 El Paso Street.
A First-Class Short Order House.
Open. Dny and Night.
EM ERSON & BERRIEN,
Undertakers,
324 and 326 El Paso St. 'Pbone 71.
g tiaiiroaaiime laoies. g
8
SANTA FE R. R.
Arrivb. Depart.
Southbound. Northbound.
S
Throuah Pas
ser, ger 9 SO a. m,
9 60 a. m.
Southbound.
Northbound.
Mixed Pass. &
Freight . 7 30 a m. ? 00 p. m.
SOUTHERN PACIFIC.
East 1 30 p. m. West 3 35 p m.
G-, H. & S. A.
West 8 45 p. m. East t 50 p, m.
s
8
found by adding 20 minutes; Eastern, or G., H. & S. A. and T. & P.
jt time is found by add'ng one hour;
by subtracting one hour. The Mexican Central leaves Juarez at 2:40 fj
p. m., and arrives at 7:00 p. m., Mountain time. The R. G.. S. M. & ii
JC P. R. R. (or Crrra,it08) trains leave
o -
Dining Hall.
EL H HULAS.
"WOO MOO SI tCr. MOR
OF-
Fitting Clothest-
PRICES.
305 1-2
San Antonio tt.
SOIL. P.A.SO, THXA9
WILLIAM J. LEMP BREWING CO., St. Louis. Mo
PABBT BBBWINQ CO Milwaukee. Wis. '
El Paso, Texa:
TEXAS & PACIFIC.
West 10 05 a. m. East 2 10 p. m.
MEXTCAN CENTRAL.
(Santa Fe Depot.)
North -7 35 pm. South 1 40 p. m.
R. G., S. M. & P. R. R.
(Juarez)
North I 10 p m. South 8 10 a m.
SUNSGT LIMITED.
East 11 30 a. m. Eat 12 00 m.
West t :-0 p. m. Weft 5 00p m.
Enstbfund. Wed and Sat
Web"und. Mon, ann Tliur.
and Southern Pacific t'me ia fouod
Jutrez on Mondays, Wednesdays
. . ...
SJ-
TURNS TO GOLD.
Wizard Edison Will Develope Abandon;
pd Mines
In an interview in a New York
pper l nomas a. reason is quoted a?
follows:
'I do not believe that there 19 a
fiigle known gold mine in the Unit t
States, abandoned or worked, that 1
cannot operate at a p ofit. I am sun
that 1 ran, by a n w process which J
have invented, profitably mine or
wh eh contains as little aa $1.25 wort1
of gold to the ton, and I prefer low
the hieh grade ore."
He recently invent a proc ss ior iron
mining by which he isutiliz'rga grade
of ore so low that it has heretofore
been considered absolutely useless. By
the use of machinery on which he
holds patents, he is going to make
millions of dollars out of ma e-ial
which no otb.tr manufacturer could
afford to even consider. His process
has been proved to be a success, and
his assistant i r sponsible for the
statement that Mr Edison "is go ng
to make more money out of this than
be ever made or will make out of his
other inventiors," and thatnreansa
ere at deal when it is considered thtt
out of this other inventions the iztrd
had made enough so that he could
afford to risk more than $2,000 00 in
his iron mining venture before get
ting a dollar in relurn.
He is now prepar ng to go into the
gold mining business on a large eca'e,
and contemplation of the wizard's pa-t
works makes t certain mat a new era
of gold mioine wr'll be inaugurated
with bis advent in'o the field. When
he declares: ' I do not believe tba
here Is a single gold mine in the
United States, abandoned or worked,
that I cannot operate at a profit," it
means mucv.
"This is not a Dew idea of mine," sai l
Mr. Edi on to a correspondent who vi
sited him at Edison, N. J.,. "for I have
been expr rimenting with gold ores on
and off ever since 1875; but I have re
fra'ned from speaking for publication
on the subject because I had not until
very recently got my process perrectea
to a point where I felt sure of my way.
"In mining gold I shall employ sub
stantially the same process that I am
now using for mining iron, wnen i
speak of mining it is not in the sense
that the term is generally u-ea. ire
day of the old fashioned miner the
man who dies the ground with a pick
is past so far as I am concerned. I
have no use for him. My mining is an
done by machinery, and it does the
work after a fashion that is practically
automatic, to. Not a man touches a
piece of the iron ore that we are tak
ing nut of the around here; nor does a
man touch even tie nnisnea proaucs.
the hr'quettes of iron, unless by acci
dent after they have been dumped into
cars readv for shipment. JNOt a numan
hand touches eltber tne ore or oriqueic
tes at anv stasre of the process
When we run at lull capacity, aoout
5,000 tons a day, the entire force in all
departments oi our worits win not ex
If life were one long summer day and its
journey through a garden of flowers, it
might be possible for people to be careless
of their health without fearing; evil results.
Unfortunately, since Adam and Eve were
driven froui the Garden of Eden, life has
not been a toilless journey through a garden
of flowers. Man must earn bread bv the
sweat of his brow, and woman must bring
forth children in pain and suffering.
In both cases the curse is multiplied
many times over because both men and
women neglect their health. Man's toil is
rendered a thousand times harder by the
added burden of ill-health. The woman is
a still srreater sufferer. She suffers in si
lence untold agonies from weakness and
disease in a womanly way. Motherhood
becomes to her a menace of death, and her
babes are born with the seeds of disease
alreadv imolanted in their little bodies.
There is but one unfailing remedy for wom
en who suffer in this way. It is Dr. Pierce's
Favorite Prescription. It acts directly on
the delicate and important organs that bear
the brunt of maternity. It makes them
s tr on e. healthy, vigorous, virile and elastic.
It allays inflammation, heals ulceration.
: soothes pain and tones and builds up the
t tortured nerves. It fits for wifehood and
' motherhood. It does away with the trials
of the period of apprehension and makes
baby's advent easy and almost painless,
i Thousands have testified to its marvelous
: merits.
' I was afflicted for fonr years with local weak.
I ness, but would not confess it for a time." writes
Mrs. Beulah Woodall, of Bateman, Patrick Co.,
I Va., "then I took the Favorite Prescription '
z ricncnmioa
and Golden Medical uiscove:
!ry,' and they cured
Pierce' medicines
I me. I cannot praise Dr.
I too much." I
UNCLE SAM DISCOVERS A MICROBE.
ceed 250 men. That means, of course,
that our automatic machinery takes
the place of several thousand men.
The men we employ are net miner?;
tby are macbi ists, engineers and
laborers, and their work is simply to
start the machinery, to watch it while
it works and to make repairs. It ba
got to be eo to mine low grade ore
like ours, which yields only about 25
per cent iron, and sell the product at
the low- prices quoted now. It could
not possibly pay if mannal labor were
employed.
"To make a profit o- tv . 'nw grade
gold ore on which it is my int. r.tion t
work, the same automatic m-cloery
must b? emp'oyed".
"I take little stock from my point of
view in Klondykeor any other place
where men pick up surface gold.
The great profits oa go'.d mining in
the future are to come from these
big low grade deposits near at
hand.
"As I said, I would not think of set
ting up a big plant to work an ordi
nary vein. Even a elt 100 feet wide,
forty feet deeo and a, half mile long
would rot, pay to dig. What I want
are deposits about 10.000 feet long and
about 600 feet wide, wi'h a little gold
scattered all through t.hrn."
BOARD OF EDUCATION.
The New Board Organizes Last Nigrht
The old Organization Continued.
Tne newly elected school board met
last night in Supt. Putnam's office and
organized by continuing the organiza
tion of the former board. There wer-
pre-ent, President Race, Secretary
Pew, Treasurer Foster and Trusteer
B acker, Martin. Magoffin and Shel-
ton
Judge Blacker remarked that the
proper fling to do at the outset was to
tak'! action on reorganization; and read
the following resolution which was
adopted: Whereas, -by a recent deci
sion of the court of appeals, the nur-
ported organiz uion of the Dublic free
schools of El Paso, March. 1883. was
held illegal and dec'artd null and void;
and whereas, it btctme necesearv U,
reorganize the public free schools of
the ciiy, which steps have all been
duly taken according to law; and
whereas, now the city has the ex-
uaive legal control of all the Dublic
free schools within i s limits: and
whereas, a tax not to exceed odo hal'
of one per cent has been duly voted by
toe tax payers or toe city to support
the same; and .wh( reas, toe members
of the board of trustees who were in
office at the time of the aforemention
ed decision have all bee a re-elected ac
cording to law, therefore be it resolv
ed: That in organizing this board we
ratify and confirm the organizaiion of
the former board as show by the min
utes of that body, as the present orga
nization of this board:
That we adopt the rules and regula
tions of tto ft rmer botrd in full exceDt
the fo: lowing sections which shall be
as follows:
That all the acta of the former board
as shown by the minutes of that body
be here and nnw adop ed. ra ified ana
confirmed, and declared the legal ac's
of this board;
That all contracts, debts and agree
ments or tTe former board be
ner aca now ra ided and declared
valid.
Prof Putnam then offered for con
sideration the following changes in the
Sec. 1, Art. VIII, to read as follows:
'On the firet Monday after the
close of the school term of each sc hool
year, or as toon thereafter as prac
ticable. the b ard of trustees shall
elei t te ichers of the public schools for
the en u ng j ear. They shall be elect
ed one yea- unie&a s oner dismissed
for cause.the board f trustees to iudce
oi ranis-" Buuicieni o just Olsons at.
Sec. 5, Art. VIII. to re id a-f , Hows
All teochers of th se schools are re
quirtd to be at their respective school
ro m- at least thirty minu'es btf.r tie
oper ing of each sesioa of school. They
shall open their schools punctually at
th app inted tim s a d devote them
selves during- school hours, exclusively
to the discipline and instruction of
their pupil. Should a teacher from
any cause be ta-dy, she fchall send on
tne day that the tardiness occurred, a
written explanation or reason trie re
fer to the secretary of the school boird,
who shall present the-ame to the
board at its regular me-tirg; prov d d
that h'-bitual tardiness on tho part of
any techer shall ba sufficient cause
for immediate dismissal.
Sec. 6, art VIII, to retd s follows
All teachers shall ma'n'a'n order in
their rooms in a kind, impariil
judicious manner. Thev shtil have
ccntr 1 of thr-ir rooms at all tim s and
remain therein during the recitations
conducted r-y the special teachers and
give such assi-tnce as i necessary for
tf e best v o k by tbem. They may
punish, when in their judgment nec
essary, by reprovinf, ta kirg and with-
arawing privileges, detaining aft-r
t . . , - ,, ,. .
I sent oi nou's, ana oy senoiDg them or
I reporting with them in person to the
principal or superintendent, or punish-
ed corporeally, pr ovided that the pun
ishment be administeiei wit-i a switch
of reasonable siz?, and that the parent
or guardian of the pupil to be
chastized authorize the tea -her by a
written notice to administer such
punishment.
Sec. 6, art. IX, To read as follows:
For misconduct or lack of prepara
tions of le.-sons. pupils may be depriv
ed of privileges, detained after school
hour-; reported and taken to superin
tendent, punished corporeallyaa pro
vided in sec 6, art VIII, or suspended
or expelled.
Id the matter of the first suggested
change, the superintendent said that
teachers were anxious to get out of
town as ;soon as possible after the
spring term had closed, and the fact
that the board did not act on the ap
pointment of teacbe-s for the ensuing
yer until June meeting kept teachers
in town perhaps a week after they want
ed to go aw.sy. Therefore it would be
well to act ou appointments a month
earlier, so tb.it teachers would know
whether they were to be returned or
not. It was brought out that some of
the teachers were wont to skip before
the closing exercises were concluded;
the board did not approve of at all and
it was the opinion that the teachers
shou d all remain until everything waa
over for the school year.
In the discussion of truancy there
was some doubt as to what constituted
a valid reason for absence, and the
superintecdent utated that some
parents would deliberately send in ex
cuses for truancies, which was subver
sive of order. It was urged that
pa-ents ohou'd explain why children
were kept out of school, and that mere
requests should not go. Some of the
bourJ advised that where a child was
absent a good deal for reasons that did
.ot appear valid, he or she be dropp
ed from the rol's and the chance fir
an education be given to a more worthy
child who was ready to enter the
schools.
The resolution relative ti re-organi-
zat on offered by Judge Blacker was
adopted and the changes in the rules
itid regulations suggested by Supt.
Putman were referred to the Internal
committee and Treasurer A. G. Poster
to report on at the March meeting of
the board.
Trustee Martin moved that the
schools be continued for the full nine
months this school year, provided
that if the necessary funds are not
available in the regular way, the treas
urer be instructed to borrow money
from the banks on the same basis as
heretofore.
Mr. Shelton bee called attention to
the fact that the expenses of teachers
for the balance of the current year
would amount to $19,300; there i-due
the banks 83300 and there will be an
expense of about $2500 more f"r
other expenses, making about $25,000
necessary to fini h the present school
yea-; that Mr. Smith the city tax col
lector thought the schools would short,
ly receive from city taxes about $12000
to $15,000 with which $3000 on hand
would have a deficit of only about
$7000; and fiat the shortage at the
close of 'ast year was aout $6000, it
showed the schools had run but little
behind last year notwithstanding our
rifflculties. Secretary Pew thought
tbe d ficieocy would be near $9000; but
if people paid up their taxes tne scorol
bard ought to receive $14,000 or $15,
000 during the coming six weeks. Ma
yor Magoffi a said the taxes would be
come de lr que it March 1. but many
foreign property holders were ready
to send in their taxes immediately on
official roMncation from the city asses
sor's office.
Trustee Martin's motion for th nine
months' continuance of the schools
wa carried, Mr. Foster alone voting
ro. Mr. Foster stated in explanation
of his vote that he favored keeping the
school open nine months, if funds cou d
be provided for payment of debts, but
that it ehould be the prime object of
the board t" get and keep on - a ca h
basis, Derm t'.'ng no discounting of
warrant. aDd therefore he objected to
tbe form of the mutio-. D fferent
members aarreed with Mr. Foste
proposition but thought it would give
the city a b'ask eye to cut sbort this
school term. but that next year it m'ght
become necessary to have only a seven
months' term.
The following hills were read and
al'owfd: Davis Plumbing company,
$31.15; W. G. Walz, $213.00; Electric
Light company, $2.00; W. H. Tufln,
$5.40; Buchanan & Powers, $9 87: W.
A. Irvin, $18.15; A. M. LoomU, $30 00,
A. J. Cole?, $20 00; H. B Stevens,
$85.00; Tims Publishing company,
$3.00; Momsen & Thome, $72 40; S ef-flnn-Krakaur
Hardware compsnv,
7.0"; Hul"s Printing h-use, $1.60; J.
R. McGiibo-i, $5.50; Emarson & B r
rien, $47.45
Tbe board derided tht all moneys
on hand should be appl ed to the n"t'8
held by tbe banks, 't was asrreed to
allow teachers to discount their war.
ran's, as be'ng preferable to payment
of salaries in casri with seven month .
of school. If the levy was insufficients
there might next year be only seven
months of fcchool,
KING ft CO.
OFFI 1FS :
Freudenthal : Blick,
(Upstairs.)
Corner El Paso
and
San Francisco Sts.
El Paso, Tex.
HOUIiS:
9 a va to 5f p. m
Night haurji: 7 to 8.
Expert Specialists
Special Doctors for Special Diseases
Consultation Free.
OATA DDL!
We have placed tn our of-
uninnnn ace then
ITE3T and most
MODERN APPLIANCES for the TREAT
MENT of CATARRH, LUNG and BRONCHIAL
LFlseases. oy our innaiuiaon process tne med
icine comes in actual contact with the dl
seased Darts and when our treatment Is car.
rled out we ouarateb a CURE In each case
acceDtea lor treatment.
rriuiAtr niccAcrc . w. treat
i I-in n i i iiuknoto by K L E C-
TRICITY, making the old way of Instrumen
tal examination absolutely unnecessary.
NERVOUS PROSTRATION. l EIICORRHOIf A.
IRREGULARITIES and Excess of Menses or
such ailments readllv disaDpear nnder our
treatment Try our home Treatment If not
convenient to come to our omce.
WE" PI IRC 8pECIAI, DISvASEof MEN,
WE. liUflL Nervous IteblUtv. DesDond-
ency In Younir Men suffering from youthful
follies. KIDNEV and UBAJ&v4i9ieg
PILES, STRICTURES, by Electricity. SKIN
BLOOD POISON aTeX-
nrjRED without the useo' Mercury.
WRITE
ior symptom tiianus it living
away from citv. Cases success
fully treated throuah our oerfect system of
Mail Treatment.
WEST TEXAS SADDLERY CO.,
Cor. Oregon and Overland Sts.
EL WkSO ... TEXAS.
Longwell's Transfer.
am now prepared to do all kinds of
. Transferring of Freght, Light
and Heavy Hauling.
Safe Moving a
Specialty.
Headquarters at El Paso Stables.
All orders promptly attended to
Phone No. 1.
Tnj. T. LotiotwaV.
El Paso Lime Works.
A. COi 'UCHESNE, Prop.
A CAPACITY Or 100 BUSHELS FEB DiY.
MANUFACTURERS OF
Hydraulic White Lime
Correspondence Solicited.
Consult free Dr. Re
gister about the New
Cure for Consumption,
Bronchitis & Catarrh.
Freudenthal Block.
The board adjourned to meet on Sat
urday afternoon at 4 o'clock to approve
tbe bonds of the treasurer and secre
tary. An El Paso Industry.
A Herald reporter paid a visit yes
rday to the yard and plant of the El
Paeo Brick company where he found
President Myers actively superintend
ing the firing up of a new kiln of brick.
The superior product of this plant has
wrought quite a charge in tbe El Paeo
building trade, (it might be said, a re
volution) and a change for the bettor
to judge by the imr roved appearance
of the new stt uctures going up arouDd
town over the older residences and
business blocks.
The plant of this company occupies a
peculiar geographical position, being
locat-d in New Mexico, just across the
river from Texas soil and within a few
hundred yards of the monument mark
ing the Mexican bourd-iry line. A
switch has been comp'eted from the
west end of the S P. bridge down to
the works so that tbe brick can be
loaded directly from the kilns on to the
cars.
The company are at present running
three kilns with a monthly capacity of
about a million and a half, but expect
to put in two more kilns shortly. The
brick is made from a hard clay or sha'e
which has to be blasted out, a sma'l
mountain of which exists immediately
back of the works. The clay is quar
ried and dropped directly into the
works where it is shoveled into tbe
pulverizers and ground fine. After
this, it is elevated into the mou'ding
and preFs'ng machines, corning out in
the form cf neatly shaped brick. Tbe
whole operation is entirely automatic
from the time the clay enters the
works at tbe rea, until it comes out in
front of the machines ready for burn
ing in tbe kilns. No wau r, ia used in
the process. The Cay is bard and ap
parently dry although Mr. Myers says
it contains about 14 per cent of mois
ture. Some idea of tbe immense
power of 'he presses may be obtained
from the fact that the pulverized clay
upon entering the machines has ap
parently no adtiesive qualities what
ever, but aft-r bpinp subjected to the
tremendous power of these p-esses, it
is fo-med into compact olocn?, even n
their unburnt ?ttte capable of sustain
ing great weight without crumbling.
Several different colors of clays exist
in the deposit referred to, which
enables tbe company to turn out brick
of a great variety of different colors and
shades from a deep red to almost white
and of all degrees of hardness.
This institution has now passed the
experimental stage and become a firm
ly established industry and one which
El Paso may be proud of.
A Chic go church is said tobefittd
up with eleotric collection boxes which
travel tbe rounds of the pews when the
button is pressed. The schema will be
a fa lure after th nove tv is worn off.
It takes the appealing -ye of the astute
collector and suggestive paue" of the
box to woo tbe coy nickta from its seclusion,
R Stevens,
i estate and Insur
ance Agent.
I Solicit Collection of Rents
and make no charge for
Advertising.
forIbale
NORTH STANTON STREET, near
Hildebrand residence, 2 lots; $900.
One-third rash.
NORTH KANSAS STREET, 3 I lota
for $700 cash.
UPSOM AVENUE, between N. El
Paso and Santa Fe Sts., 45 feet for
$600; one-third cash. -NORTH
OREGON STREET, corner of
Rio Grande, 175x175. Room for 5
houses. CHEAP.
MESA AVENUE, 2 lota, corner, for
$700.
IDAHO 8TREET, 3 lots at a sacrifice.
BUSINESS CORNER, Vleca avenue
and Texas street, 115x60 let t. A bar
gain and terms to suit.
12 LOTS on San Antonio street facing
Magoffin homestead.
TW O LOTS on East Overland. Chean.
ONE LOT, near Mesa school.
60x120 feet on W st Overland street.
BUSINESS PROPERTY, paying $70
per month, for $6,000
$4,500 will buy a row of houses paving
$64 a month.
MONTHLY INSTALLMENTS and a
small cash payment will buy 7-room
brick house, 116 Upsom Avenue.
614 N. OREGON STREET, brick house
5 rooms. Easy terms.
407 N. EL PASO STREET, 6 rooms,
cheap.
409 N. ETj PASO STREET, 7 rooms,
brick.
BRICK HOUSE of 5 rooms on North
Stanton Street; southeast corner; a
nleasant home.
NEAR S. P. DEPOT, on N. Kansas)
Street, 5-room brick.
GOOD PAYING LODGING HOUSE,
15 rooms.
LARGE BRICK RESIDENCE, cen
trally located. Suitable for fashion
able boarding.
I also write
,.Fire Insurance..
in BEST Companies
at .LOWEST rates. v
Loan Money on City Property
Insure you against A CCIDENT
in the
' "Travelers.55
Horace B. Stevens,
Real Estate and Insnr-
. . ance Agent.
EL
CD
CM
m
CD
EXT. WALT
Makes the Weak Strqnf
DR. CHUNG,
Imperial Chinese Herb Phy
sician and Surgeon.
He has graduated in the best medical col
leges In Ohlna and America He Is of great
eminence and learning, hiving long exper
ience In the imperial hospitals of Ohlna.and
practiced his profession In America for 10
years and cured thousands of sick and af
flicted. He guarantees a cure of all disease
of men, women and children, no matter tt
others have failed to cure you.
Try DB CHUNG, office 304 San Antonio B
El Paso, Texas
Or FOSTER,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.
Special attention given to Real Es
tate and Probate Law. Will practice
in all the court.
ROOM 8. MUNDY BLOCK.
V.T. PASO. TF.XA8
..WHOLESALE
is i jls s.
DEPOT..
7est Texas, N-w Mexioo,
CMhuabua and Sonora,
Mexico. Agerts wanted.
We do repairing.
EL PASO CYCLE CO,
. Mesa Avenue

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