OCR Interpretation


The Nashville globe. [volume] (Nashville, Tenn.) 1906-193?, October 21, 1910, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Tennessee

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86064259/1910-10-21/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

MA
if
ii-jn g.
Qui. ji
Vol. V.
NASHVILLE, TENN., FRIDAY, OCTOBER 21,1910.
No. 42.
EAST TENNESSEE
CONFERENCE A. M. E. CHURCH
SESSION.
Meeting in Historic Town j
Tullahoma. !
CALLED TO ORDER WEDNESDAY
MORNING BY BISHOP H. B.
PARKS, OF CHICAGO OPENING
SERMON PREACHED BY REV. E.
P. ELLIS LORD'S SUPPER AD
MINISTERED IN THE AFTER
MINISTERED CONFERENCE OR
GANIZED IN THE AFTERNOON I
RECEPTION MEETING AT
NIGHT.
Special to the Globe.
Tullahoma, Tenn., Oct. 19. The
nth annual session or the Bast
Tentessee Conference of the African
Methodist Episcopal Church convened
in Shorter Chapel on Atlantic street,
tbis morning at ten o'clock. At the
appointed time the conterence was
called to order by ishop H. B.
tarks, of Chicago, 111., who is
the presiding bishop of Tennessee.
The members of the conference were
early in their places, with faces bright
tibat spoke for them in unmistakable
tones. They looked like soldiers who
had been through a great siege, but
who had come with their colors flying.
Devotions were conducted, after
which the bishop introduced Rev. E.
P. Ellis, of Knoxville, who preached
the opening sermon. Rev. Ellis chose
a text suitable to the occasion. He
& a forceful speaker and covered him
self with glory on this occasion. Aft
er the sermon Holy Communion was
Administered to the members of the
Conference and the church. Bene
ediction and adjournment for dinner.
The Conference re-assembled at. two
o'clock and was called to order by
.. Bishop Parks after roll call. The
first business for consideration
was the organization of the Con
ference. The election of officers
resulted as follows: Rev. N. P.
Gregg, Secretary, Rev. E. P. Etters,
Recording Secretary; Rev. J. H. Tur
er. Assistant Secretary; Rev. T. Y.
Moore, Treasurer.
The election over the Conference
The election over, the Conference
aommittees took their places and re
ports were called for by districts.
- Before the first report was read Bish
op Parks remarked that he felt sat
isfied that every man of the East Ten
nessee Conference was ready to make
a good, full report. He often refers
to the men of that Conference as
- Uhe "Mountain Climbers,'' and says
that he is prcud of them. In speaking of
their record, the bishop said they had
set ' a jnark for the state, and what
he said of the men he also said of the
Women's Missionary Society.
.The .reports were proceeded with
and a good headway was made on the
business of the week. Adjournment
was tUcen for supper and all were in
vited to return for the special pro
gram that had been arranged.
At half-pa3t seven the night session
was giveil over to the welcome ad
dresses. Bishop W. H. Heard presided.
The' participant on this occasion were
as follows
Music By A. M. E. Choir
Scripture Lesson
.....By Rev. J. C. Mc Adams, D. D.
Hymn By Rer. N. P. Gregg
Invocation . . .By Rev. W. V. Hawkins
Music By A. M. E. Choir
Instrumental Solo
By Mrs. M. L. Spencer
Welcome on Behalf of the- Mission
ary Baptist Church
. By Rev. J. S. Swift
Welcome on Behalf of the Sunday
School ...By Miss Nannie Cannon
WeTcome on behalf of the City
Teachers. ... By Mi3s Mayme Davis
Solo and Chorus
... By High School Choir
Welcome on Behalf of the Citizens
; By Prof. M. L. Jones.
Welcome on Behalf of the District. .
By Rev. J. H. Smith, P. E.
Response on Behalf of the Confer
ence... By Rev. T. Y. Moore, P. E.
Remarks . .Rt. Rev. H. B. Parks, D. D.
Collection and Announcements.
Benediction
... .By Dr, I. H. Welch, A. M., D. D.
The program was enjoyed immensely.-
At the conclusion of the exercis
er Bishop Heard turned the gavel
over to Bishop Parks. He introduced
the visitors as follows: Revs. A.
Sampson Brooks, W. B. Denny, A
Brooks and T. W. ILaigler, of Nash
ville; Rev. W. A.' Lewis, Secretary
of the Preachers' Aid Association;
Rev. Gardner, of Shelby ville. Bishop
Parks then introduced Dr. C. V. Rom
an, M. D., of Nashville, a prominent
layman in the church, who addressed
the conference. He held the attention
of the large audience present for
about twenty minutes as if they were
charmed. The doctor addressed his
remarks particularly to the young
people. The gist of. his remarks was
to Impress upon his hearers the abso
lute necessity of thinking. He
showed that an individual who thinks
wins and that those who allow their
feelings to govern them lose. He
said, "The Negro started late in the
race of achievements, and to catch up
with the procession he would have to
run fast and continually."
At .the conclusion of Dr. Roman's ad
dress a collection was taken followed
by adjournment.
BAPTIST SUNDAY-SCHOOL UNION.
The City Sunday-School Union will
hold its second meeting at the Fair
feld Baptist Church Sunday, October
23, 1910, at 3 p. m. We make a
special appeal to every local minister,
superintendent, teacher and pupil to
be present and make this meeting
jus what it should be, as the Union's
motto is "Everybody Join Hands and
Onward and Forward We Go, Lifting
Fallen Humanity, Inspiring Sunday
School Workers and Elevating God's
Cause in the Minds of .the People."
A splendid program will be rendered.
Let every one" come prepared on the
Sunday-school lesson for October 30.
Take a Fairfield car and get off at
the corner of Green and Fairfield
streets. .Rev. B. J. Majors, pastor.
Dont's forget the services will start
at 3 p. m.
DR. C. M. WELLS DEAD.
Special to the Globe.
Birmingham, Ala., Oct. 20 Dr. C.
M. Wtells, D. D., editor of the Bap
tist Leader, did in this city to-day
after a long illness. Dr. Wells was
a prominent character in Alabama,
having for years been a leading
spirit in the Baptist denomination
pnd an incessant worker for the up
lift of all the people. He had been
ill for several months, but never gave
up as long as he had strength to go.
Tie visited the last session of the Na
tional Baptist Convention in New Or
leans, though but a snadow of his
natural self. The funeral will be
held in Montgomery, the home of the
deceased, Sunday, October 23.
DIES AT MOTHER'S HOME.
Mr. Henry C. Martin died Sunday
I at G a. m. at his mother's home two
ard a half miles on Elm Hill road
utter an illness of twenty-four months.
Funeral services were conducted from
Ebenezer A. M. E. Church by Rev.
Simpson Brooks and Rev. Reed. Mr.
Martin is survived by a wife, mother,
two brothers', two sisters and a host of
relatives. The honorary pall-bearers
were Mesdames J. W. Wendell, W.
D. Lust, W. L. Cheatham, N. Lust, D.
Houston, F. Southall. Acting pall
bearers were members of the G. U.
0. of Odd Fellows.
MRS. ALLEN, OF PORTLAND.
After having spent about two
months away from home during which
t'me she visited many places in the
South, Mrs. W. D. Allen nee Medley
ard her two children left for their
ivome in Portland, Oregon, Thursday
night. They went from here to Chi
cago, where a day was spent: from
there hoe. Mrs. Allen is the wife
of Mr. William D. Allen, proprietor of
the Golden West Hotel, son of Mr.
a"d Mrs. Alln. of Fourteenth ave
nue, North. While here Mrs. Allen
w?s te receWent of a deal of social
attention. Although born in Canada
and having lived most of her life
there, she was well Impressed with
the people of Tennessee and Nash
ville. DEBAUCHING THE
It is alleged that there 13 conducted
in a prominent building in the heart
of the city what is known as a social
club, but what In fact is a saloon and
assignation house. People whose In-teg-ity
cannot be questioned say that
any night boys and girls In their teens
cn be seen going and coming from
this hall in droves, and wnen they go
In they walk upright, but wheal they
ve they are in an intoxicated con
dition. Parties who have visited this place
say that there are morp Doys and girls
being mined in this so-called club
room than in any other way;'glrl3
with knee dresses on and boys with
BOND ISSUES
BURNING QUESTION BEFORE
THE PEOPLE
State Normal, Black Dot
. torn Elimination.
AND GAS FRANCHIE TO BE DE
CIDED BY THE: PEOPLE CITI
ZENS OF NASHVILLE AND DA
VIDSON COUNTY AWOKE TO
NEEDS OF THE , DAY THREE
PROPOSITIONS CERTAIN TO
CARRY ALL THINKING PEOPLE
..FAVOR THEM TWENTIETH
CENTURY SPIRIT.
"The bond Issues must pass" Is the
remark that can be heard on the
6treets of Nashville dally. It seems
to take first place when it comes to
considering the very important Items
that are to be settled by the citizens
of Nashville and Davidson County on
the 8th day of November. "The bond
issue must pa?s" resounds and vi
brates everywhere in this grand old
county. None of the taxpayers or ci
tizens are leaving anything undone
that might aid in the carrying out
this proposition or the enactment of
their wishes into a law.
Proof of this was thoroughly demon
strated thel3 week when the white and
black citizens, who are firm in their
determination, called a meeting and
derided on the following: First, the
black bottom bond issue of three hun
dred thousand dollars; second, the
State Normal Agricultural College
bond issue of twenty-five thousand dol
lar s; third, the gas franchise, wrth its
greater advantages. It further de-
ve'oFS, after careful and close inquiry, .
that ten white men of the bluest blood
in the South, leaders and splendid
types of citizenship, met ten loyai aiid !
patriotic black men and outlined plaas ;
ty which all party or factionalism
would be laid aside, political lines
eliminated and the interest of Nash
ville put first and foremost. It ap
pears that these men who, by the way,
are said to have been selected from j of business they have engaged in till
both sides, after a careful conference lie feels that if the race is to be up
with their own respective people, are ' lifted at all it must be done by Ham's
not politicians, but business men,' and ' sable sons, and in the greatest or all
that all of thera are large tax-payers, i sections of this country, "Dixie Land."
While the three bond issues were Ml'- Dirkson says in so far as he
named in order, special stress was , is able to discern and he has watched
-ut on the interest of Nashville or I tne movements of business men for
which can be best subserved through ! morft than a Quarter of 8 century
the redemption of black bof.t.n " and 1 tnat tnere 13 nothing but success
the industrial education and tralninz of ' aVead. He feels quite sure that con-
the Negro youth
"It can be said that not a Nero
nor white man v ho. has V.a. ini- e-t
of Nashville at heart
either of these important
are to be vot"d upon." This Is the
re-rark of leading white ir.i on'ihc
streets of Nashville, in discussing the
o'H'ome of the conference But fur
ther than this, somethijf,- more defi
nite is handed out by the leaders
amon gthe Negroes, who have been dis
cussing for many months the black
bo'tom proposition along uitU the
Normal School idea. Hardly a Ne
gro who i? able to vote has missed
an opportunity to pay his poll-tax and
register. This of itself is regarded as
the irest significant thing in the ap
nroachirg election, as it will make
Nashville all the more beautiful in
the p'ace where black bottom now
stands, and where disease and crime
now predominate, nature will pa
rade dressed in season gowns, to
gladden the hearts of many.
GIRLS AND BOYS.
knee pints on. This dive Is said to
be the worst ever operated in this
city. The people are up In arms and
are determined to put this nuisance
jout of existence.
! Men who have visited this place
j say that It is a saloon and dance h?.ll
fomtined, and Is a trap set for the
thoughtless men and women and the
lnexrerienced boys and girls. Recent
ly a man told a Globe representa
tive that on the night previous he
saw fully twenty-five girl come out
of thl3 place and not one of them was
over eighteen years old. How the au
thorities can go blind to such a dls-
eraceful affair is what puzzles the people.
Whether a school owned and ope
rated by the state, where the deserv
ing Negro youth w.'ll be persuaded
and encouraged to learn how to work,
and not encouraged to loaf the streets
of Nashville, filling the chain-gang and
making the criminal record of the
race wrose, whether a new organized
gas corporation that will hand out to
Greater Nashville the advantage of
fered by such cities as Louisville, At
lanta and New Orleans, will all be
decided on the morning of the 9th of
November. The world will know
whether Nashville Is progressing or
retarding, whether she is entitled to
the term "Greater Nasnville," or a
back number; whether she belongs
with the twentieth century cities of
the nineteenth century villages.
.
PRAISE FOR THE SOUTH.
Mr. Dickson, of Buffalo, N. Y., Throws
a Bouquet to the Business Interests
of Dixie Land.
After having connected himself with
the business interests of about eight
different states in the South, and stu
died thti conditions as well as one
could from a distance, not having ever
crossed the Ohio of Potomac Rivers,
Mr. Charles A. Dickson, of Buffalo,
N. Y., in writing to friends through
the Nashville Globe, throws a bouquet
to the business tact, far-slghteaness
and ability of the Southern isegro
that Is worthy of publication.
CHAS. A. DICKSON.
Fc r four years Mr. Dickson has been
one of the closest observers ot every
business undei taking of tne Negro of
the South. He has read after them
and kept up with them in every phase
fidence of the greatest kind Is being
established among his people down
hei e.
.' . ' ."' ' J,
f . - ' j '
r . J :;
V- .; j , ' V '
Vf- ''
i 'T1 the North and East, he has a 1'nger-1vii-s
that , , 4V,' tl
ing ai c nun iui iiic yai b ui uic cuuu-
try that he has never seen, but
a part that he has studied much and
which, he believes, has been grossly
misrepresented. Using bis familiar
rh ase: "I was born in the North,
reared In the North, cast my lot
in the North, and know only the
No th. I am too old now to start life
anew; but you fellows work things
out the best you can In your own way
for the betterment of us all. We will
join hand?, heait and pocketbooK with
yo-i when the occasion demands."
Whn making this remark he was
contemplating making new invest
ments in sooie of the many banks he
is alieady connected with. It is stated
that he is a stockholder in both of
the Nashville banks, and in at least
one-thitd of all the Negro tanks in
the United States and he is still
clamoring for more. Mr. Dickson
seys he likes the South, not for its
narrowness and race prejudice that has
been extolled, magnified and misrep
resented to him on more tnan one oc
casion, but for the hustling Negroea
who live within its bounds and who
have in yea-s past, by thflr brawn,
made it blossom like a rose and who
now add brain to brawn, making It
a veritable Elyslan.
MRS. RICHARDSON HERE.
Mrs, Pau'ine Richardson, of Key
stone, W. Va., Is in the city visiting
relatives. Mrs. Richardson Is well
known in Nashville, having lived
here all of her childhood. She left
here with her husband, Mr. Eueene
Richardson, five years ago for West
Virginia, where he went to assume
foremanship of the McDowell Times.
SEN. TAYLOR
OPENS HIS CAMPAIGN IN JOHN
SON CITY.
Fires Broadside in The
Emmies Camp.
SHOWS UP HOOPER STATES HIS
POLITICAL CREE PLAINLY BE
LIEVES DEMOCRACY COUN
TRY'S SALVATION REFERS TO
HIS PARDONING RECORD
PEACE AND PROSPERITY HIS
AIM LARGE CROWD OUT TO
HEAR THE OPENING GUN
FIRED.
Special to the Globe.
Johnson City, Tenn., Oct. 17. Fal
lowing is the address of Senator P.
L. Taylor, opening his campaign for
the governorship of Tennessee and to
cave democracy from defeat:
Fellow citizens, I come to you to
day with a harmonica In my mouth,
with an clive branch in one hand and
a bowle knife In the other, and with
a heart full of good will to my fellow
man, provided that my fellowman
votes for me for governor. I am not
a candidate for glory, for my people
have given me all the halo that any
poor soul ought to wish for In this
world, but Impelled by as pure a mo
tive as ever heaved in human breast,
I have received in my humble hand
by the unanimous voice of the great
est convention that ever assembled In
Lhe state, the standard of democracy
and of the peonle, and I unfurl It to
day with aU that it means and all that
it meant in the past, glorifipd, as it
K by the love and devotion of the no
Mest spirits our country has ever
known I unfurl it above the heads
of those who love It and In the facs
of those who would trail it in the dust.
When I siy I bring a message of
peace and good will, I do not mean
tiat the standard of democracy Is a
Pag of truce to men in high places
who have dishonored It and who are
attnirtinjr to deliver my state to the
Newell Sanders wing of the repuhll
crn party. For my shield is polished
and my spear is sharpened for them
and I warn them now that T will
fight them under its amnle folds to
the lat ditch. I wiU fight them until
death for Its triumph and for the
principles it represents. I am for
peace to the rank and file of the peo
ple, but I am for war to the hilt with
Hooperism and Enloism.
j Our state is crying for peace and
' there is no reae and there never will
, ba resee aealn in Tennessee until
I these ambitious politicians In both
parties are put to the sword of popu
lar condemnation and buried forever
in oblivion.
I
. CH ARCED WITH T.EADTNO TIIE LAWT.ESS
I EI.EMEXT.
They tell me that I am leading the
'awlrs element In Tennessee, and
teir candidate for governor has d .
rlared to my own people that I have
ncvrr becL on the moral side of any
question. Gret God. must I pubmlt
to a blow like this from such a source?
And yet I maist have charity, for in
te estimation of Hooper there is
nothing moral that Is democratic, and
tere lg nothing immoral that is re
puhliean. Unfortupately for the republican
arty of Tnnesse. Mr. Hooper Is not
a reordless as they, thought he was
when tvey nominated him for govern
or of Tepnecsee.
Fellow c'tizens, my life is full of
mi3taVe3 and blunders: so is the life
of every man that Is bom of woman,
but I have grown gray In the midst
of my peorle. I have reached the Oc
tober of life with these old men who
look me In the face, and they knew
whether this candidate of morality is
felli"g the truth or slandering hla
fellow man. I have not always
wlVed In the straight and narrow
pth. Who among you all has never
woTbled out of It? There Is only oua
sn In Tennes-ee who has not, and
that Is Hen Hooper. This glorious
spirit has already sprouted hi? wings
to bo an ancel. I think Mr. Hooner
eans well. I think he 1? sincere for
this trip only when he protests his lore
ard devotion for U" old confederate
soldier, but since uen did he change?
(Continued on Page 6.)

xml | txt