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The Nashville globe. [volume] (Nashville, Tenn.) 1906-193?, October 27, 1911, Image 1

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NASHVILLE, TE.N., FRIDAY. OCTOBER 27, 19 1
No. 42
Y..L. VI.
I 1 AN
! N "v V J J M
OUTLOOK BRIGHT
Itl NASHVILLE
!NEV BUSINESS E NT ELI
PIUSES STAHTE1).
General Feeling of
Mutual Interest.
that it will be necessary for encour
agement to te given to every citizen
in the bounds of this corporation. The
best of feeling prevails among the
white and black people here and every j
one Is showing the disposition to do j
tinto his brother: as he would be dono ;
by. It is believed that within the'
next few years Nashvlle will outrank
any city in ic South, for with the
spirit of brotherly interest existing ,
everywhere it is absolutely impossible
to thwart that growth that comes to
any communty where all the citizens
are pulling in the same direction. .
ON
A. M. E, C
FEBENCE MEETS
IN FOllTf-FOUllTH SKs-SUN.
JOHNSON'S THEATRE N EARING
COMPLETION WILL HAVE
LARGE SEATING CAPACITY
WILL BE OPERATED AS WELL
AS OWNED BY NEGROES EM
BALMING SCHOOL ON FOURTH
AVENUE BRANCH OF CINCIN-j
NATI INSTITUTION OTHER'
EVIDENCE OF MUCH PROGRESS.
Tho hnefnpiHa nntinnlr In Nashville
v, -
among Negroes is very promising at ;
this season. Many improvements are
being made and permanent growth
is visible in many ways. Several en
terprises have started recently with
such promise and it is rumored that
others will bo opened up within the
near future. Nashville Negroes are
soon to have what they have desired,
namely, a flr3t-class theatre owned
and operated by members of the race.
Mr. A. N. Johnson is erecting a com
modious and magnificient brick build
ine on Cedar street, which will have
offices and store rooms in front and
a theatre in the rear. The approach
to the theatre will be through a wide,
commodious hall or walk-way to a
flight of stairs, which will lead to the
theatre from the hallway. The seat
ing capacity will be suffcient to ac
commodate the citizens of Nashville,
and the plays selected, or rather the
companies that will be engaged for
this theatre will all be of the highest
character. It is the manager's inten
tion to make it a first-class amuse
ment hall where all of the people can
go and enjoy themselves.
Another business enterprise Just
started 13 tho new embalming com
pany started by Mr. Leach and others.
The concern is under the direction of
the Embalming College of Cincinnati.
This branch is for the specific
benefit of the Negroes who are in
the undertaking business.
BISHOP TYREE RETURNS TO ,
TEXAS. j
Bishop Evans Tyree left the city i
Monday night for his field of labor j
in Texas to complete his quadrennial
work. On the eve of his departure
he expressed himself to a Globe rep
resentative as hopeful of a good
year's work. He cited that the
churches in the Lone Star State that
are of the African Methodist con
nection had raised ten thousand and
some odd dollars and cents for edu
cation. TJhis money goes to Paul
Quinn College at Waco, Texas, which
is rapidly forging to the front among
the schools of the African Methodist
church. It is very probable that the
next General Conference, which con
venes in Kansas City in May, will
transfer Bishop Tyree to some other
district as he has. spent eight years
already in Texas. The people mere,
however, will be glad to have him re
turn. It is not known ;ust where he
will be sent However, the people of
Texas are very .proud of their leader
and gladly receive him for the third
quardrennial if the General Confer
ence should see fit to send him back.
Delegates to the Gen
eral Conference.
ASSEMBLY BEING HELD IN ST.
JOHN LARGE CROWDS IN AT
TENDANCE REPORTS ARE
' VERY GOOD GENERAL IN
CRESE IN FINANCES AND MEM
BERSHIPREV. S. L. HOWARD
LEADS DINNER SERVED AT
CHURCH EACH DAY NEXT
MEETING AT MT. PLEASANT
APPOINTMENTS MONDAY.
An enterprise of which not much
is heard, but is " destined to do
a great good to the needy peo
ple is the old folks' home be
ing' erected by Dr. C, H. Clark,
pastor, of Mt. Olive Baptist Church.
This institution will fill a long-felt
need to the old people in the church
that is supporting it and shows that
the leadng Negro pastors in the city
are waking to the needs of the people
Dr. Clark has done a great deal of
work for the uplift of the people in
Nashville, and never tires, but is al
ways discussing and devising plans
whereby the dependent of the race
can be taken care of. Aside from
these individual institutions the city
is becomng aroused and concerned as
to the welfare of its Negro citizens.
They recognize the need of a library
for Negroes that they may read and
keep posted on the progress of the
times. They also recognize the need
of parks and playgrounds that the
Negro children may be kept in a
healthy condition. Every indication
points to times of peace and happi
ness in this cty. The slogan adopted
bv the Board of Trade. "Nashville Of
fers Opportunity," is taken to mean
that every citizen must be made to
feel that he is a part of this munici
pality. The opinion is expressed that
the hearty co-operation of every Ne
gro will be had, which co-operation
serves as a great lever in the efforts
being put forth to place Nashville in
the proper sphere.
The Y. M. C. A. work among
Negroes in receiving attention.
It is Dointed out that when the
white people made their canvass
for funds to erect their Y. M. C. A.
building, that those Negroes who
were able to do so contributed freely
to that cause. It is also remembered
that the Negro voters of the city came
to the rescue when the high school
proposition was before the people.
The Nashville Negroes have con
vinced the world that they are inter
ested in everything that pertains to
the upbuilding of their home city and
to keep this spirit alive it is argued
WASHINGTON PROSECUTES UL-RICH.
The Educator's Assailant Again
Pleads for Delay Case Se$
November 6.
New York City, Oct. 17 Harry A.
Ulrich, the drunken thug who so bru
tally attacked Dr. Booker T. Wash
ington, the Tuskegee educator, on a
public street in this city last March,
was "brought to book" in the Court of
Special Session, Part V, today, Judges
Zeller, Mayo and Ryan presiding.
Dr. Washington was in court to
prosecute Ulrich; present also were
his secretary. Emmett J. Scott; Hon.
Chas. W. Anderson, Collector of In
ternal Revenue for the Second Dis
trict of New York; Fred R. Moore,
writer and publisher of The New York
Age; Hon. Ralplv V. Tyler, auditor for
the Navy Department, Washington.
D. C; George W. Harris, of the Am
sterdam News, and other of Dr. Wash
ington's friends.
The people of the State of New
York were represented by Assistant
Attorney James E. Smith. .Dr. Wash
ington's personal attorney, Willard H.
Smith, was present as consulting at
torney. Ulrich has continued to have this
case continued each time it has been
called for trial, hoping that Dr. Wash
ington would drop the prosecution;
to-day, through his counsel, ne again
pleaded for delay, .claiming that he
had not been able to get his witnesses
into court this despite the fact that
he has had seven months to do so.
District Attorney Smith opposed the
motion, claiming that. Ulrich had no
witnesses, and that his plea for delay
was simply an effort to avoid the con
sequences of his brutal and uncalled
for assault. The judges decided they
would give him one more chance, and
have set the case down for trial Mon
day, November 6. Dr. Washington
has notified the District Attorney's of
fice that he will cancel all the
engagements he has for Wisconsin
and the West, made long since, so as
to be in court and prosecute Ulrich.
The assault occurred several months
ago, and Ulrich at the time told con
tradictory stories of what led to it.
To tho police he said that he had ta
ken Dr. Washington for a burglar,
but to the reporters he said that Dr.
Washington had insulted Mrs. Ulrich,
his wife. Ulrich, however, was never
married to the woman he claimed as
his wife, and the real wife of Ulrch,
who lives in New Jersey and was de
serted bv him several years ago. con
fronted him in court when he was to
day arraigned for trial.
The meeting of the Tennessee Con
ference of the African Metnodist Epis
copal Church has attracted much at
tention during the week. From the
lime the conference opened Wednes
day morning in St. John A. M. E.
Church, up to this time the church
has been crowded and the sessions
interesting.
This year closes the adniinistra
tion of Bishop H. Blanton Parkes,
rs the general conference 'which
ects in Kansas City, Mo., next May
will doubtless assign him to another
district, and several have Deen men
tioned as his successor. It may be
that one of the new bishops will
come to Tennessee.
The conference is composed of a
fine body of men from all parts of
the state, and many visitors from
ctser parts of the country are here,
either general office' i or aspirants
for honors in the general church,
They were to see and know the de
legates who are to go to the general
conference.
NEGRO SEGREGATION NOT
CONSTITUTIONAL.
Norfolk, Va., October 26. The
new seeresation ordinance restricting
the residence of Negroes to certain
streets and localities was declared
unconstitutional by Justice Duncan
yesterday. The court held the ques
tlon was one of taste rather than
law. The case was appealed and will
go to the Supreme Court.
Rev. J. Q. Johnson lined the open
ine hvmn Wednesday morning, and
the opening prayer was made by
Bishop Parks introduced Rev. F. YV..
Rev. A. P Gray. Following this
Bishop Parks introduced Rev. F. W.
Gardner, presiding elder or the Shel
byville district, who preached tlj4
opening sermon. It was scholarly and
well delivered. Then followed Holy
Communion administered by Bishop
Parks, who was assisted by the pre
siding elders of the conference. "Be
fore we go further let us sing the
song that mean3 so much to us as
ministers of the gospel," said Bish&p
Parks, and lined "And are we yet
alive'" The ministers joined in the
singing with much fervor and shook
hands.
The roll was called by Rev. J. A.
Jones, D. D., of Shelbyville, Presi
dent of Turner Normal and Indus
trial College. The following officers
were elected: J. A. Jones, D. D., sec
retary ; G. W. Hodge, assistant sec
retary; S. W. West, statistical secre-;
tirv: L. Buford. C. L. Smith, J. W. :
Thompson, C. A. Jordan, S. L. Ma
jors, marshals; J. T. Gilmore, corre
spondent to the Christian Recorder,
PhiladelDh at J. Q. Johnson, to the
Southern Christian Recorder, Colum-
bus, Ga.; T. W. Stephens, M. D., to,
the Western Christian Recorder, Kan- j
sas City, Mo.; J. A. Crump, to the,
Voice of Missions, New York City; ;
Charles Stewart, ofheial press repre
sentative to the dally press and se-'
cular papers.
At this DOint the Bishop announced
that the conference was duly or
ganized and officially announced the
death of Rev. T. W. Haigler, presid
ing elder or the soutn Nasnviue dis
trict, and out of respect the confer
ence adjourned five minutes. Then
followed the introduction of visitors.
Among those introduced were Revs.
John Huret, D. D or Washington,
D. C, financial secretary; Julian C.
Caldwell, D. D., Nashville secretary
Allen Christian Endeavor: Mr. Ira
T. Brvant. Nashville, secretary of
A. M. E. Sunday School Union; Revs.
J. R. Ransom, D. D., Topeka, Kans.;
M. H. Leath, Florence, Ala.: G. J.
Robinson, Belle Fountain, Ohio; J.
W. Richmond and W. L. Denton, of
the Methodist Episcopal Church. .
The committees were announced
and the conference spent the rest of
the day hearing reports of pastors.
Most of the reports were in advance
of the previous year.
During the noon hour dinner was
served in the lecture room of the
church by a committee from Payne
Chapel A. M. E. Church, East Nash
ville. "Self-help" was the keynote of the
several addresses delivered at the
rc ptlon ghen the bishops and mem
bers of the Tennessee conference at
the African Methodist Episcopal
Church Wednesday night at St. John's
A. M. F. Church. A large crowd was
TTrsent, many being unable to get
striding room.
Rev. S. L. Howard, pastor of the
fhrrch. presided. He said In the out
set that the people were proud to
have in the city some of the mov
no d men and women of the race,
and that It. was a pleasure to hlra .
to turn over to the conferente headed .
by one of the -nost noted men of the 1
Neero race of America, Bishop Parks, j
th keys of the church. J
The first address of welcome was
delivered by Dr. W. S. Ellington,'
editorial secretary of the National ;
IBiptist Publishing Board. D. A. ;
I Hart, secretary of St. John's Church,!
delivered an address, after which Rev. '
: J. A. Jones, president of Turner Col- j
leg--, spoke.
Bishop Parks then maCe an able ,
address In which he spoke of the Ne-!
! pro and his achievements during the ,
i past forty years, showing that he 1
: had not been asleep but was .up and .
doing. j
' Before taking up the reports Bishop .
' Parks introduced Rev. I. H. Jones,
of the C. M. E. Church; W. G. Por-;
I. r, D. D., and II. F. Smith, presiding
e'derb of the Central Tennessee Con
fen nee; T. II. Blackman, H. P. Bel
cher, of the Methodist Episcopal
Church; J. F. Dean, Dixon, Tenn.,
and W. A. Lewis, D. D., secretary :
and treasurer of the Connectional
Preachers' Aid Association of the A
M. E. Church, with headquarters in
Nashville.
Dr. Lewis stated that ne was put- j
ting forth an effort to establish a ;
fund for the aged ministers who had
given their life in the service. He :
wanted that there should be a place
where they could go for food and
shelter when unable to preach. i
Report of Pastors. i
The report of pastors who were not
T -.-esent at the opening of the con
ference claimed attention. Rev. W. :
Sampson Brooks, pastor or St. Paul ;
A. M. E. Church, reported that the i
church had sent to the conference
$;U0 for the dollar money fund, whicn
, was over last year, and the church
had collected for Its running ex
! nenses $5,000 since the last session of
the conference. He was given an
ovation. '
: The Committee on. First Year's
Studies reported that Rev. Jesse J.
Parker, who was a student in Tut
ner College, had passed the required
examination and passed him to the (
second year. ,
Class Failed.
! The entire class of the third year
( failed and will have to remain in
the class another year. Bishop Parks
' said that the man who wanted to
j keep up in the ministry would have
ito study. '
j The questions in the discipline were
, asked and answered. Question 13, i
"Who have -died this year?"
At this point the death of Bishops
Ahram Grant and James A Handy
i was announced, also Rev. T. W. Halg
1 ler, presiding elder of the Nashville
' District, and Watson Johns, local
I deacon of St. Paul.
Mt. Pleasant Selected.
I "Where shall our next conference
'be held?" To this question, Mt.
I Plensant was selected.
The Bishop announced that it had
I been the custom of the church since
1 its organization to hold a General
I Conference, and to such a conference
delegates were elected. "We have
: now reached that place in our con
' ference. You will not have any ob-
jection to electing. How many dele
1 cates is this conference entitled to,
Brother Secretary?"
"Six." came the prompt response
from Secretary Jones. Revs. J. C.
Caldwell and G. W. Porter were elect
or tellers; J. G. Robinson and D. A.
Graham, clerks.
The following delegates were elect
ed on the first ballot: Revs. A. P.
Gray, W. Sampson Brooks, S. L.
' Howard, W. B. Denny and G. L. Jack
son. This narrowed the race clpwn to
Revs. H. L. P. Jones and G. R. Nor-
man. The first ballot showed Rev.
Jones to be In the lead and all of j
the strong aspirants withdrew and
save him the field. He was elected
; by a big vote.
I Dinner was served by St. Paul
! Church members. Every member of
the conference and many others were
' dined sumptuously In the large- Sun-
day-school dining-room.
Friday morning. October 2Cth, the
I conference opened with devotion. Af
I ter a few preliminaries the report
Jof St. John A. M.E. Clfcirch was
called for. Rev. .Howard had a
splendid report. Over $G,000 had been
raised for all purposes and the church
(Continued on Page 4.)
EAST TENNES
SEE SYNOD
HOLDS ANNUAL SES
SION AT COLU31MA.
Kntertaiiicd by 31 1.
flll,. fU 1.
liiuur I'll m en.
LARGE DELEGATION REPRESENT
ING MANY PARTS OF COUNTRY
REV. C. B. DUSENBERRY MOD
ERATOR IMPORTANT SUB
JECTS DISCUSSED THE HOME
TRAINING OF THE CHILD FOR
CHURCH NEGRO COMPARED
TO PIPPIN BY ONE SPEAKER
A MIGHTY FACTOR IN HIS
COUNRY.
Special to the Globe:
The East Tennesse Synod of the
Presbyterian Church convened here
at Mt. Tabor Church Oct. 19th, and
continued until Sunday night, 22nd.
There was quite a large delegation,
with many sections of tne country
represented. At 7:30 p. m. Thursday
the Synod was called to order by the
moderator, Rev. C. B. Dusenberry, of
Aaheville, N. C, who preached the In
troductory sermon. Rev. D. S. Col
der, pastor of the local cnurch, read
the report of the committee on ar
langements. At 11:30 a. in. Friday
there was a slrmon by Rev. H. L.
Peteison, A. M., of Memphis, Tenn.
At 7 : CO p. m. Rev. J. W. Malloy (white)
of the First Presbyterian Church,
Columbia, Tenn., by invitation oi
Rev. Collier made an address on the
"hnportance of Home Training of the
( nild for the Church." Ills remarKs
along this line were very appropriate.
Mr. Craig, who has traveled around
the world In the interest of the
church, made a very interesting talk
on the progress that is being made
in the foreign fields by tne mission
aries, both intellectually and spirit
ually. At 9 p. m. Rev. G. T. Dlllard,
D. D.. superintendent of the Sunday
school work for the colored people
In the South, spoke very ably and In
terestingly on the 'Condition of the
Negro, His Position, His Progress,
' His Opportunities and Row id Better
These Conditions." In part, Dr. Dll
lard said that "the Negro was a great
factor, for he is the only race that
can stand up and look 'he white man
in the face;" In his comparison he
describe the Negro as pippin by the
side Of a crabapple tree," and says,
"because of the sourness of the crab
apple no one ever trouples them; but
the pippin being sweet, everybody
wants them and it is with the Negro
today because of his importance as a
mighty factorl n this country every
body is after him, and with all of
the figuring and figuring af'er him,
regardless of what the result may be,
the Negro still continues to progress."
With reference to the estimation of
the Negro's standing, he said, "the
white man too often judges the Ne
gro at a l'.g distance, and generally
pnssrd judgment on him before any
evidence was reached." Dr. Dillard
is quite a speaker, and the freedom
with which he uses his words and
the manner of his delivery are evi
dence that he is quite a profound
thinker.
BISHOP C. S. SMITH AS A PRE-
SIDING OFFICER.
Of the forty-five delegates who pre
sided over the various sessions of the
Fourth Ecumenical Conference, To
ronto, Canada, October 4-11, 1911,
Bishop C. S. Smith, of the African
Methodist Episcopal Church, alone re
ceived special mention by the press.
The Christian Guardian, or Toronto,
Canada, which was the official organ
of the Conference, made this observa
tion:
"Bishop C. S. Smith made a good
chairman. With the urbanity of his
race, he gave some liberty where oth
er presiding officers rigidly forbad.
Perhaps that lent itself to a freedom
of discussion which is one of the best
features of the conference."
The Christian Advocate, Nashville,
Tnn., the officialorgan of the Metho
dist Episcopal Church, South, gave ex
pression as follows:
"One of the best presiding officers
of the conference is a colored man
Bishop Smith, of the African Metho
dist Episcopal Church. He Is ready
and appears equal to all demands."

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