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The Nashville globe. (Nashville, Tenn.) 1906-193?, July 05, 1918, Image 2

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86064259/1918-07-05/ed-1/seq-2/

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NASHVILLE GLOBE, FRIDAY JULY 5. 1918.
TO GROW LONG,
STRAIGHT HAIR
You Hed Rtil Scalp Food.
Thar are to mm 7 to-rll4 haii
ror on tbe market, a larga nn ru
ber of which are nothinx mora tbn
pertain ad greaae. It I no wonder p
S la ret dlicourajed and loia faith Id
all hair took In deciding what
to oaa on your acalp be aura and get
remedy of proren merit. Sebri
nm.an u a DiRniy medicatS'l po
aiada that baa atood the teat of time
It la a real acalp food; It atlmula'.ee
ad DonrUhea the roota of the hair,
austnx a natural growth of long hair
Qntnade la the Intention of an ex
Tart ahamlst and la made under the
uperrlalon of an experienced reen
tered pharmacist It makes the hair
soft and smooth and eeaj to put up
In the style desired.
To get best results from the nse of
Oulnade it Is necessary to shararoo
the scalp about every two weeks with
Seeby'a Qulnasonp. Qulnasoap Is
made entirely ont of pure rentable
oils, principally rocoanut oil, ana la a
thorough cleanser. Qulnasoap lathers
Tery freely. It leaves tbe hair soft
aad fluffy and Imparts a refreshing
feeling to the scalp unequalled by
bv other shampoo.
Do not accept any substitute, bnt
Insist on getting Seeby's Qumade and
Saeby'a Qulnasoap, asking for them
by the full name. Price ts 25 cents
aeV If your druggist or dealer does
aot stock these two articles, ask n'n
to obtain them for yon from his
wholesaler or send ns th price and
we will mall them to vou. Write to
Seeby Drug Co , 7 East 130th Rtreet
New Tork City, for a sample el
Qulnade. mentioning the name el
this paper. Adv.
boys and girls qualify for successful
business careers. The following sug
gest ion was sent out to Local Negro
Huines league some months ago:
"Frequently, we find In the South,
stores owned by white pejple, especial
ly gent's furnishing and furniiuro
st rc?. where the colored porter Is
a!- weJ to serve colored custom.!-"
This sort of thins should be encourag
c 1. 11 the colored boy Is brW'it nt d
shows an aptness in grasping business
details and the tine points of saleinan
ship, the Local Negro Business
League should take him in hand and
help him to improve himself along this
line, remembering that this young
man may be future material for the
sales-management of a Negro Busi
ness enterprise."
and the Increasing demand for our! And all of this applies not merely
growing Army, with the fluctuating 1 to wheat, but to any other staple food
tupply of local beef in Kranee, all I poduct of which we way have an
make it impossible to determine poll-; abundance,
ctos for a long period in advance.
The Food Administration has recently
asked for economy in all meat con
sumption; now it eniphasiszes furth
er reduction of beef by the substitu
tion of pork. It is anticipated that
this program mill hold pood until
Peptemher 15, and the Food Admin
istration most earnestly requests co
operation of the public.
DEATHS.
Alvln Terby, 1 year 5 months, 1106
Grundy Ave.
Sopjiia Logan, 49 years, 14 Trimble
St.
Edith Elizabeth Bliss, 6 months, 45
Lincoln Ave.
Clara Elizabeth Womack, 10 months
24 days, 101S Overton St. (rear.)
Matilda Matthews, 32 years, 1304
16th Ave. N.
Mattie Simpson, age 24 years, city
hospital.
Robert B. Parks, infant, 1234 4th
Ave S.
Eli Starks, 22 years 620
Herman St.
Mary lienwoody, 67 years, 2214
Herman St.
Ilattie Smith, 32 years, 302 Capi
tol Ave.
Willie L. Bigley, 31 years 1317
Donelson St.
Annie Moorman, 43 years, 616 Tea
body St.
Amanda Brown, 32 years, 281fl
Clifton Ave.
Burtha May Smith, 1 year,55 La
lefayctte St.
Kidiard Tinsley, 67 years, City
BUSINESS LEAGUE BOOSTERS
By Albon L. Holsey.
Tuskegeo Institute, Ala A booklet
entitled "The Negro in Business In
Philadelphia" has recently been Issued
by the Armstrong Association of that
city. The compiler summarizes the
study as follows.
"A summarj' review of this study
shows a very large number of busi
nesses of small size. This small size
of the business and the lack of em
ciency frequently found may lie due
V.0 one or to several of the following
causes: Inexperience, lack of train
ing, lack of ability, difficulty in gecur
lng capital. The Negro who wishes
to enter business Is usually Inexper
ienced and untrained, and has prncti
cally no opportunity of apprenticeship
in the stores or offices of white busi
ness men, There are very few busi
ness men to appreciate him. It is
true also that no business courses are
available for them in the school; but
even if such courses were offered they
would although of much assistance,
be of small value in comparison with
the apprenticesship available to white
boys and girls and young men and
women."
The National Negro Business
League has frequently called atten
lion to the need of concerted action
on the part of the race to help our
THE OPPORTUNITY TO BUILD UP
RESERVES. "
How large will this years crops be?
And what use wCll this Nation make
of them?
Such are the queries which nowa
days are all important and are heard
everywhere. .Most vital of all, per
haps, is the question of our approach
ing new wheat supplies, and how much
supplies are to be utilized. At pres
ent the most careful estimates place
the 1918 wheat crop at a high figure,
and there is little reason to doubt
them.
What is to he done with this wheat?
To find the answer for this a good
many people far too many are ar
guing thus: "Wheat supplies at pres
ent in this country are abnormally
low, have been In that condition for
Hunter some time There are all sorts of
! trade restrictions regardine the
amount of wheat that can be bought.
sold, and used. The housewife has
been told to conserve wheat in every
way, and has done so. Now, if the
approaching wheat crop is large, let
us at once rectify all these abnormal
conditions, and get back to our norm
al pre-war domestic conditions. That
is surely the only sensible course."
Such reasoning is altogether false
Worse than that, it Is unpatriotic, in
that it contributes nothing towards
our troops or the Allies. Our coming
wheat crop, which -shoua begin to
Therefore the coming harvest tuiue
should must--tbe regarded not aa an
occasion to cease conservation, nor as
a period la which it is advisable to
"take fflf the lid" in any sense, but.
rather, as a time when our Nation
food service wllJ be greater because
its opportunity is greater. That is a
poVcy and an ideal to be lived up to
whole-heartedly and patriotically dur
ing the coming months.
CAN CONSERVATION.
Many people who have never raised
vegetables and small fruits before are,
as the result of iwar-garden propa
ganda, producing more than their
families can consume during the sum
mer. Others have Increased the sire
of their gardens so as to awell the
total production far above normal.
This prospect for a large surplus,
coupled w-ith shortage of freight and
express accommodations, . makes It
necessary for these people to buy
their canning and dry4ng outfits, cans,
and other containers early in the sea
son. For jellies and jams, old jars and
glasses may be used. No good con
tainers of any kind should be thrown
away, as they represent not only a
possible saving of food but also a
saving of glass or tin and valuable
shipping space.
It is not a saving, however, to put
up preserves in milk bottles, a prac
tice of whi.ch the milkman often com
plains.
MAKING COLLEGE GIRLS' FOOD
SCIENTISTS.
hospital.
J no. W. James, Jr., 4 months, 11051 be available sometime after the mid
1st Ave. S.
FOOD CONSERVATION NOTES.
New Meat Program.
The demand for beef for our Army,
the armies of the Allies and their
civil populations for this summer are
beyond our present surplus. On the
other hand we have enough increased
supply of pork this summer to per
mit economical expansion in its use.
It will therefore be a direct service
to our Armies and the Allies if our
people will in some devrree substitute
fresh pork, bacon ham, and sausage
for beef products.
The Food Administration requests
al1 hotels and restaurants not to place
on their menus or served boiled beef
more than two meals weekly; beef
stealo more than one meal weekly.
roast beef more than one meal weekly
It aipks householders not under any
circumstances to buy more than one
and one-fourth pounds of .clear .beet
weekly, or one and one-half pounds,
Including the bone, per person in
the household.
The public will realize that the
changing conditions of production
from season to season, the changing
situation in shipping, and therefore,
of the markets availabl e to the Allies,
die of August, must be regarded as a
potent al factor in maintaining the
strength and morale of the armies
and people in allied Europe. Such an
achievement c an be accomplished
only by regarding the coming crop of
wheat as a means for building up a
roserve, practical and efficient in its
possibilities. Tt is true, of course,
that with a larger supply of wheat
in band, some restrictions regarding
domestic use may be modified or re
moved. But such removal of restric
tions should be regarded as only in
cidental. No mere assets of domestic
convenience can beHn to equal the
ilnportanco of an adequate reserve.
Such a reserve will prov'de an ac
cumulation of at least one staple food
product which will permit real flexi
bility of usefulness. That is, is will
It is natural"! that In faolng the prob
lem of carrying the message of food
conservation into all corners of the
land the Food Administration should
have turned to the cologe girl for
aid. She represents a vast amount
of potential energy, which, with her
trained mind and quick aptitude for
leadership, would make her service
invaluable provided she had the nec
essary ii'ipcciul training i nthe science
of food.
As comparatively few colleges gave
their students an opportunity for this
special training, the National Food
Administration in Washington sent
out three courses of study last winter
to every co-educational and woman's
educational institution in the coun
try. The fiitt of these courses gave the
history and organization of the Food
Administration, its purposes and poli
cies, as well as the most Important
facts regarding the world food situa
tion. It was designed to give the col
lege girl a basis tor an intelligent
left optional to the student. The re
sponse of the college girt to this op
portunity to equip herself for active
service in food conservation was be
yond all expectation. Over 20.(k'0 di
plomas were issued Sn June by the
United States Food. Administration
to the college girls who had passed
the examinations in these authorized
courses tu food science. Many oth
ers took one or more of the courses,
tint did not take the examinations
and so did not receive the official dl-
poma from Washington.
Upon the clos ng of the college for
the summer recess, each girl who de
sired to do active service in the work
of food conservation was put In touch
with the secretary of Volunteer Col
lege Workers of the Food Administra
tion in her particular State, who in
inrrt nlaced her where her special
trnliiln and antitude would make
hr services valuable.
This means that ttn June a vast
army of young womanhood went out
of 720 colleges and institutions all
over America equipped with tne run
damental facts of the food situation,
and eager not only to five their own
lives irn accordance with tne iooa
conservation commandment but to in
fluence others to do it also.
BRITISH FOOD REGULATIONS
FOR INVALIDS.
Recent regulations ty the British
Ministry of Food Indicate that Inva
lids are to be well cared for. The reg
ulations allow a greatly increased ra
tion to sufferers from milk cases of
diabetes and from tuberculosis. Dia
betics are allowed the maximum of
two and one-half pound of butcher's
meat, one pound of ibacon, and one
and one-half pounds of butter or
margarine weekly. Tuberculosis suf
ferers are a1 lowed a malmum of two
and one-half pounds of meat, one
pound of bacon and one pound of
butter weekly, in view of the fact
that protein and fat are necessary to
the diet of consumptives.
Most foods, besides mflc, which
are important in cooking for the stck
such as eggs, fish, rice and flour
are not rationed. For all who need
It. extra milk may "be obtained through
local food controllers. The Ministry
of Food states that applications for
white flour should be reduced to a
minimum, since it has been shown
that war bread when properly baked
and chewed is as digesti'ble as white
bread, though t may not be eo pala
table. With the allowance made by
the Food Controller, it is possible for
invalids of all classes to recive suit
able foods and enough for their
needs.
fJL" -positively rtlP5? j
K3LARY fc HOWSE PHOff B MAIN IOC
HOWSE BROS.
FURNITURE, STOVES AND CARPETS
r TERM TO SUIT BVERYBODY
W Cm lumlab Tour HooaaCowiplate rtero Parlor to lUMfcMfc
We TA Old Good a rt Pavtaaiiti Balance Wcaklr frTnrtMOr
304-300-908 BROADWAY NASHVIMB, TENNC
TirB PEHJ7ECT FLOUR
ILMOHT1B
FOR BISCUITS, CAKES WATERS, ETC THE BEST UN THE
MARKET. ALL GOOD COOKS USE IT.
LIBERTY MILrLS
NASHVILLE TENIfKSSBR
I
help guard against any unforeseen i T " V, 1 . I T
and iinfavorohtA omn rtiHnn in day nnd t'10se hat lom the norl
and unfavorable crop conditions in
the future. It will aid. by constant
shipments overseas, the Allies in
bui lding up In their countries such
reserves as are necessary to guard
against unexpected contingencies
zon of tomorrow,
Course II dealt with the fundamen
tals of food and iiutritl'on in relation
to the war, and Counre III was pure
ly a laboratory 'Course, designed esep-
whlch might result from a more com-1 c y the information and to
develop tne sikiiif which would pre
pare the student to act as assistant
in official demonstration work.
In some institutions one or more of
these courses were made compulsory,
but in the majority of cases tney were
plete rubmarine blockade. Finally,
perhaps most important of all, such
a reserve will help counteract the ef
fect of the steady and continued di
version of men from food production
to other necessary war activities.
MISS COOMBS RETURNS.
The younger element is glad to
welcome back in thejr midst Miss
Francesca Coombs who has spent the
Dast winter teaching at Macon, Ga.
Although a very young lady and
a recent graduate, Miss Coombs en
joys the esteem of a large circle of
young people as well as the confidence
of a host of her father's and mother's
friends. She is well known In liter
ary circles and her musical talent
nresaRes a brilliant future. She is
the youngest daughter of Rev. A. O.
Coombs who did a great work as rec
tor of the church of the Holy Trinity
for many years and Mrs Coombs.
Uncle Sam Needs You
LET
Poro System
Take care of you
"IPORO
m
99
Poro College Company
St. Louis, Mo. - Department R
RD QUARTER SDHD AY
OOLSBPPLIESIIREADY
Send Your Order Now, Have it Filled Before the Rush is on. Orders Filled and
Mailed the Same Day Received. Don't Delay, Act Right Now.
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