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The San Francisco call and post. [volume] (San Francisco, Calif.) 1913-1929, December 09, 1913, Image 11

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You Have More to Give Thanks for Than You Deserve if You Do Not Give Others Cause to Be Thankful
The Call's Magazine and Fiction Page
A Charming Dinner Dress and a Brocaded Wrap
THE extremely becoming; wrap
of brocaded velvet shown on
the right fa made In kimono
Btyte, with big broad aleevea. A
vrlde band of Ardolse satin makes
•he girdle.
The wrap fa rounded both In
the front and back with a short
drawn up drapery effect. A broad
square collar of natural sable
completes lt. The wrap Is fast
ened at the left like the popular
■port coata worn so much this
past season.
Daysey Mayme and Her Folks B zl^Sß±^3^
LET this Simple Little Tale be a
warning to every man who has
any financial transactions with
his wife further than the weekly pay
ment to her of the household allow
ance for butter, aigrettes and cheese.
He will learn that any man who is
ln debt to his wife will not be half
done paying when he has paid the
debt threefold. Not, Gentle Reader
A CHRISTMAS GIFT
fiMi. I FOR VOrR LITTLE BOY
jf r Make- Hla Heart Olad With a
<4 SPIRO" COWBOY OUTFIT
"ffi Something out or the ordinary
\filkiu *9 for Iltt!e *>oy* aa a CHRISTMAS
iv, WQy<L ~ ' GIFT. It Is Just like the picture,
*W#\ and corneB nearer the boyish
uItiXd&MT&VJI, nW il h *»rt than anything ever thought
(1 ( Jt~M?r lmw/if/. '/mini ot - TheB « ••CHAPS." or pants.
////M%v((¥< JErK ? rft made from genuine Angora
—^■ a ' lW " a/anvu* \ furi and are exact]y uke the kind
/ I L REAL COWBOYS use. Solid
/ \ leather, dip-front belt, flower
/ - \ stamped and stoutly made
/ ) Jk\ throughout. Not a mere play-
I / urn tnln| s. but will outwear a dozen
1 1l bbV / /7» P* l ""* or overalls—and you must
.// wjj n,?m l o appreciate their
W SIZES FROM ■« TO 12 YEARS
/ \1 A I ° ur lar K« establishment is well
A V\7n| Jl stocked with an unusually at-
wA ractive line of HOLIDAY
Y&\\\ WHr jALi LEATHER GOODS. We are
jTMI) „, leather EXPERTS, and you are
«ure to get the best at lowest
J| prices when you buy of us.
* KEW SVQGESTIOTVS
1 Solft Lf>a ther Suit Case $5.00 up
Leather Traveling Baga .13.80 >ip
mWpr*tf-Jt < i i)» Dressing Rolls tI.IWI up
KJss h\Jf Leather Collar Boxes 91.00 up
fff\}hu Flne Wallets 7Reup
jiw i\ '/U* 1 Cigar Cases Boc up
titf £ MfV'A.uJ Com Purses 26> up
#/' -'Ml Ladles' Bags ft.oo up
•f/ '/ *W \ WOOL, STEAMER SHAWLS
ft'fi, ALTO ROBES. BIOGY ROBES
Mfflm SPIRO HARNESS CO.
307 TO 311 MARKET
>T.. NEAR FRKMOM
FULLY DESCRIBED BY OLIVETTE.
THE accompanying picture on the left shows a din
ner dress that has a fetching and effective sim
plicity not often attained in garments made for
such formal occasions. Two very popular textures
are used in making it: "Craie" taffeta and silk muslin.
The bodice is a small bloused effect of taffeta with
short sleeves finished by a band of taffeta. The yoke
is made of a band of Nattier velvet. A ribbon of
"Craie" taffeta is disposed in ruching at the belt, giv
ing a most effective finishing touch. A Louis XV bow
of Nattier velvet is draped in the middle front, and is
finished by one end holding up a small basket of
Rococo flowers. The other end is draped over the hip
and falls at the back, holding up a wide band of silver
lace. Under the lace hangs "Craie" silk muslin, giv
ing the fashionable pannier effect. The skirt is tight
ened at the bottom by a narrow ribbon of "Craie"
faille trimmed with Rococo flowers.
(the gentleness of readers being in
disputable and wholly irrelevant to
this tale), that women are dishonest.
They are the souls of honesty, but
their method of bookkeeping is on a
sliding scale. Just when a man
thinks he has paid a debt he owes his
wife, he finds he has slid back to the
opening account.
Some 30 years ago, when the Ly-
Sander John Appletons lived on a
farm, the stork, which in the country
is a practical sort of bird, brought to
the Appleton farm a wobbly legged
calf.
Lysander John gave it to his wife,
there being nothing in this world
quite so easy to give away as a
wobbly-legged calf that looks as if
lt won't live over night.
The calf lived to be a nice big
steer, and such is the injustice meted
out to every male In the animal king
dom, that he was not granted the
fate of the heifer, which is to reach
mature years in honor and pride, but
was ignominously carted off by a
butcher. And on his way he passed
crate after crate filled with roosters.
Not a hen among themr
Put this is not an anti-suffrage
argument.
The calf sold for $20. "I will let
you have the money as you need lt,"
said tha unsophisticated Lysander
John. -
The next Spring his wife bought a
$50 parlor set, "with my calf money,"
she told her husband.
Then there came a piano, and when
the neighbors complained she added
a cornet; then there came new china
dinner sets, carpets, etc., every year
unfolding new purchases for the
home, and all bought "with my calf
money."
"I want $50," she told him recently,
"for Christmas money. Now don't
say you haven't got it. It's my calf
money, and belongs to me."
Lysander John has tried to show
her that he has so far paid her $3,000
for the calf, but figures will He, and
she proves it.
"I sold the calf for $20 30 years
ago," he argues, "and have paid you
for it every month since. Now how
in the world do you figure that I owe
you any more calf money?"
And her sole reply Is to turn to
the back page in the family bible,
where is written, "June. 18S3, Lysan.
der aohn Appleton, debtor to his wife,
for one calf, $20."
And what answer can a man make
to a sliding scale like that!
Would Wed
a Widower
BEATRICE FAIRFAX
DEAR MISS FAIRFAX:
I am 28 years old and am keep
ing company with a man three
years my senior. I love him, and
he has often told me of his love
for me and asked me to marry
him. My friends tell me 1 should
not do this, as he is a widower.
Do you think this would make any
difference? L A A
NOW. my dear girl, who's going to
marry this man~~~you or your
friends?
If you should take your friends* ad
vice and refuse to marry him just he
cause they think this or they think
that—do you suppose for one moment
that any of these friends will take the
same sort of care of you as this man
wants to do?
It's very easy for "friends'* to sit
back in the corner and tell you who
are out in the world, trying to make
the best of your own life, what you
ought and what you ought not to do,
but I have alway« noticed that those
same friends are never at home when
you get into trouble by following their
advice.
Refuse this man, just on account of
what these people, who probably don't
care a button for you, say or even
think? Not if you are a girl of any
common sense at all.
What do they know about the man,
any way?
Is he good?—is he faithful?—does
he love you? Can they answer any of
these questions? If they can't, what
business have they to say anything
about it one way or the other?
Friends are all right when they
stay friends, but they don't always
stay friends—remember that.
If any of these people who are so
ready and willing with their advice
know anything tangible against this
man, they will tell you what they
know, if they are real friends to you.
They won't whisper or hint about
it—they'll come right out and tell
you just what it is they know, and
if it is anything really against the
man—that alters the case completely.
It is all right to listen when the
person who is speaking to you has
really something to say and the
courage and good sense to say it.
And listen, little sister—this is just
about as good a time as any for you
to get it into your head that your
life is your own—you have to live it
yourself and no friend in the world
can live it for you.
You'll have to learn to make up'
your own mind about what you want
to do and why you want to do it.
Don't be silly and feather headed
about things—don't be stubborn and
obstinate—but have your own mind
and your own heart and follow what
that mind and heart tells you to do.
You know what's rigiit well enough
and what is sensible—you need no
horde of advising friends to tell you
that.
If you love this man and he loves
you—if he's a square, honest man of
principle and character—marry him
if all the friends you have in the
world shake their heads over the
wedding cards.
He's going to be your husband—
not theirs.
Snap Snots
Even if you believe in signs, do you
pin your faith in any of the hundred
possible interpretations of them?
* ♦ *
Blessed is the woman who does not
repeat her emphatic statements so
strongly when she is trying to help
the world that she generates friction
Instead of progress!
* * *
AT SUNSET
By Robert Loveman.
The sun, departing, kissed the sum
mer sky,
Then bent an instant o'er her beat
ing breast;
She lifts to him a timid, tear stained
eye.
And lo! her blushes crimson all the
west.
BARR BARRS SLOVENS \
Captain Barr of the Carmania. who
distinguished himself in the Volturno
rescue work. Is a strict but Just disci
plinarian.
Of Captain Barr, who insists on
spotless neatness always, they tell a
story in shipping circles.
A very dirty young diver, it ap
pears, was boasting in a hotel smok
ing room about the dangers of his
calling.
"Yes," said the young man, as he
relighted the stub of his cigar—"yes,
you sailors, Captain Barr, think you
lead a dangerous life; but I, let me
tell you. I carry my life in my hands."
"Oh, I see," said Captain Barr, "and
that's why you never wash them, ch —
for fear you'll drown yourself."
REAL ENJOYMENT
George C. Boldt, tbe well known
hotelier, said of Thanksgiving In New
York:
"There's nothing like the old fash
ioned Thanksgiving—turkey and cran
berry sauce, celery and aweet pota
toes, mince pie and pumpkin pie, and,
perhaps, a bit of skating or sleighing
afterwards to aid the digestion.
"I remember a little boy at a
Thanksgiving dinner in Philadelphia
who enjoyed himself frightfully. It's
a wonder he didn't burst.
"Another piece of mince pie,
Georgie? Just a small piece?"
" 'No, mam, said Georgie. reluc
tantly. T could chew it, but I couldn't
swallow it.' "
Hale's for Toys
Market at Fifth
THE FAMILY CUPBOARD
KEN LOOKED QUICKLY FROM HIS SISTER TO THE
GIRL HE LOVED. IT WAS TIME FOR THEM TO MEET.
"THIS IS"—HE BEGAN A BIT UNCERTAINLY.
TOM STEPPED QUICKLY IN FRONT OF ALICE, SEEMING
TO BLOT HER FROM THE ROOM, AND INTERRUPTED
WITH AN EASY ASSUMPTION OF HASTE AND CASUAL
ftm Can Begin This
Great Story Today by
Reading This First
Charles Nelson, a wealthy New
Yorker, on coming home on a certain
afternoon, discovers his son, Ken
neth, drunk, and ln the scene that
follows, Kenneth accuses his father of
maintaining another establishment.
Nelson admits the truth of the charge.
His wife, a society leader, hears the
discussion, and it develops that the
estrangement in the family has come
through the woman's indifference to
her husband. Their daughter, Alice,
sides with the father, and Kenneth
takes his mother's part. Mrs. Hard
ing, a mutual friend, tries to patch
the trouble, and contrives that the
Nelsons shall meet at the Alpine
apartments, where Nelson has gone
from his home. In the lobby of this
apartment house Mrs. Nelson acci
dentally meets Kitty May Claire, the
girl who had won her husband's af
fection. After his wife leaves. Nelson
has a talk with the girl. He tells her
they must "quit" The girl declares
she will have revenge. She takes it
by having the son. Kenneth, fall in
love with her. He moves to an apart
ment house ln which she has lodgings.
There settle upon the boy as leeches,
Jim, Kitty's father, whom Kenneth
believes to be only her chauffeur, and
Dick le Roy. Kitty's former dancing
partner in vaudeville. When Ken
neth proposes marriage Kitty frankly
tells him of her experience with a
man she does not name. Kenneth
insists that she tell who it was.
Now ReaTOrT]
(From Owen Davis' play now being presented
at th» RS)house by William A. Brady.—
Copyrighted, 1313. "by International New»
Service.)
Continued from Yesterday
Perhaps Kitty would have told him
the truth then. Perhaps if she had
lt might have all been very different.
But the telephone rang—and Kitty's
hour passed. The telephone rang—
and Kitty May remembered again her
debt to the house of Nelson!
"Answer it," said the girl.
"Hello!" cried the boy into the lit
Shop Early
We have everything with which to beau
tify the home, both useful and ornamental.
Gifts to meet all requirements, from 50c up.
Free delivery throughout California.
S. & G. Gump Co.,
246-268 Post St
Adapted from Owen Davis' Broadway Success.
tic instrument that was to play such
a big part in his life.
"Hello! No! No! Not at home. No!
I won't see any one."
"It was my sister," he told Kitty
quite unemotionally.
"I wonder what she'd think of me?"
said Kitty May. It hurt—this taking
stock of herself —this wonderina
what people would think —when for
so long she had laughed at the world
and whatever it chose to think.
"This man—the one you told me of!
Who is he?"
"Not now! I don't want to talk
about him!"
"I'll find out! He's going to pay—
for what he's done—to your life—and
mine." stormed the boy in desperate
frenzy.
Kitty spoke with weary indiffer
ence.
"Yes. but what good is it going to
do after all."
Sne- wondered what good anything
did. Revenge—love—the desire to get
even—the memories of the past—it
was all a hopeless circle. Kitty hao
the imagination to plan events—but
she had not the penetration to fore
see how individuals would act in the
situations she brought about. In a
far corner of her consciousness a
thought was struggling to life. Had
she hopelessly mismanaged her life
after all? She was so tired of play
ing her weary game.
The boy was still railing against
the weary round of fate. She won
dered why she did not get more en
joyment out of hurting Charles Nel
son's son.
"You were a child! Working for a
miserable living! This beast came—
and 1 IK'S GOT TO PAY! You didn't
understand. You didn't understand!
Poor, little, underpaid, 16 year old
child—how could you understand?" ;
Kitty repeated allowed after him,
parrot fashion:
"No—l—couldn't understand."
HIS SISTER
Ken stated toward her —in his eyes
love reviving—and the man's desire to
protect—to fight for the woman he
loves.
"I don't blame you at all—no decent
man could!"
Who can tell what that moment
might have meant in the life of Kitty
May? But just then Fate knocked at
the door. The girl and the boy faced
each other for one tense, breathless
moment. On its own heights. Love
can banish all sordidness—money,
hatred, wrongdoing are all forgotten
—on the heights. But the air of the
height is too fine — mortals can not
breathe there for long. Kitty shrugged
her shoulders. Fate had offered her a
love, a devotion, of which she was not
worthy—and now the game was inter
rupted.
"Come in!" called Kenneth.
The door opened and his sister.
STOPPING TO LEAVE A MESSAGE.
"EXCUSE ME, KENNETH, ALICE HAS WORRIED BECAUSE
YOU WOULDN'T COME TO SEE HER. SHE WANTS YOU TO
COME TO MY MOTHER'S HOUSE TONIGHT AND HAVE A
GOOD TALK. WE CAN'T WAIT NOW, OLD MAN. COME,
ALICE. WE WILL SEE YOU TONIGHT. COME!"
Alice, with Tom Harding looming big
and protective at her side, stood on
the threshold.
"I came up, anyway, Kenneth, dear.
I had to see you."
The sister spoke with loyal love
and patience for this dear boy-man
brother who was a year older than
she—and so sadly younger.
Suddenly her eyes fell on Kitty.
Almost of their own volition her lips
stopped forming syllables. Tom came
quickly to her side.
Ken looked quickly from his sister
to the girl he loved. It was time
for them to meet.
"This is"—he began a bit uncer
tainly.
Tom stepped quickly in front of
Alice, seeming to blot her from the
room, and interrupted wiih an easy
assumption of haste and casual stop
ping to leave a message.
"Excuse me. Kenneth, Alice has
worried because you wouldn't come to
see her. She wants you to come to
my mother's house tonight and have
a good talk. We can't wait now, old
man. Come. Alice. We will see you
tonight. Come!"
There was unmistakable authority
in his tone. Alice walked quietly to
ward the door as Tom opened it and
stood aside with the air of a cavalier.
"You will come? Promise, Ken
neth!"
A little flicker of belligeranoy came
into Kenneth's eyes and echoed in
the firm tone of his voice. There was
a swagger of bravado in his manner.
He had a vague feeling that Alice and
Tom were high handedly "putting it
all over" him. He forgot for the
moment all that had gone befi| c. He
spoke with an ease he could scarcely
be expected to feel.
"I didn't ask you here, you know.
In fact, I sent down word that I
wasn't at home. But you chose to
come. Well, here you are, and you
don't have to run away like this!
Alice! I want you to meet this lady!
She"—
Throwing the door wide open, Tom
came a step toward Ken. He spoke
with a crisp directness:
"Sorry—we haven't time."
Alice stood in the doorway, grieved
Essential to the daintily set j
table. Serveitfortea,coffee,cocoa
2 and 5 pound Sealed Packages
Full and half-size pieces.
f\ THE AMERICAN SUGAR REFINING COMPANY Ik
A Dramatic Story of High
Society life in New York.
and puzzled at her brother's heavy
handling of the situation. Kitty re
mained aloof, with a half smile on
her Hps and a whole sob in her
heart.
Ken fairly charged the event like
an enraged young bill. He had stopped
reasoning now—he only felt.
"Harding! You cant away like
this! If you insult" —
Continued Tomorrow
EASY WAY TO
STOP HAIR FROM
1 COMING OUT
A harmless home remedy, compound
i ed principally from the powerful juice
|of the Pernambuco shrub of Peru, has
: been found highly effective in prompt
!lv checking the falling of hair from
; the scalp. Men and women whose hair
lis growing alarmingly thin and falling
I out badly every day should try it
| without fail, as the ingredients" are
perfectly harmless and very inexpen
; sive and the whole tiling can be pre
i pared at home or by any druggist.
| Merely mix together in an 8 oz. bottle
2 oz. Lavona de Composee. 6 oz Bay
Rum and M drachm of Mentol Chrys
tals. Shake well and allow to stand
| for an hour, when it is ready for use.
| The Lavona in the above is the phar
i maceutical name of the Pernambuco
! juice as diluted and scientifically
prepared for medical purposes. To
stop the hair from coming out and to
quickly start a fine growth of new
hair all over the scalp, rub this lotion
briskly into the scalp with the finger
tips or a medium stiff brush for about
five minutes each night and morning.
After three or four days' use in this
I way you can not find a single loose or
i straggling hair. Dandruff will disap
pear and Itching cease, and in about
| ten days you will find your scalp cov
j ered with a thick growth of fine
j downy new hairs, which will grow
! with amazing rapidity.—Advertise-
I ment.

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